Tag Archives: Branding

How To Get More Listeners For Your Podcast – PTC Episode 181

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How To Get More Listeners For Your Podcast – PTC Episode 181

More Listeners and Engagement
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How do I get more listeners? How do I grow podcast traffic? How do I create more engagement. How do I get more people to my website?

I hear those question quite often. It is a battle every marketer faces. How do I bring more customers in the door?

I knew the subject was a hot topic, because I see discussions everywhere. How many product launches have you seen that promise to teach you how to get more traffic?

HOW TO FAIL

In 1962, Time Magazine called David Ogilvy “the most sought-after wizard in today’s advertising industry.” David Ogilvy is quoted as saying, “Great marketing only makes a bad product fail faster.” Be careful what you wish for.

If we use the premise that great marketing simply makes a bad product fail faster, we first must make your product great. Then we can bring people to the party.

We are going to take a look at both steps to this process.

GREAT CONTENT

Let’s make your content engaging and memorable before we invite your prospects to the show. If you create a unique experience, your engagement will be much more effective when people come to the party.

When I first started programming radio stations, I failed. We didn’t win, because I didn’t create a unique, memorable experience for our listeners.

We were playing the best music at the time. Our on-air talent was solid and experienced. The station was at all of the concerts and bar events. We were checking all of the boxes that made great marketing.

There was only one problem. The content between the songs wasn’t entertaining. It was simply content.

When you listened to that station, there was no fear of missing out. We weren’t doing anything unique that you couldn’t get somewhere else. It was very pedestrian.

Fast forward 4 years when I was creating another brand new station. This time, we were going head-to-head with a radio station that had been in the market for 20 years. We had our work cut out for us. But this time, we would be unique and end up at number one.

The other station had been around forever and was very arrogant. They didn’t respect their listeners. They played average music. They were too lazy to be on the streets at the right events. Listeners couldn’t get on the air. The station also sounded old.

Our strategy with this station was to create a radio experience that made the listener feel like they had ownership in our station.

As we created the experience between the records, listeners would introduce our new music, so it sounded like friends turning other friends on to new music.

Our contests were centered around listener experiences. This allowed listeners to live vicariously through their friends.

Listeners hosted our countdown shows and gave shoutouts to their friends on the air all the time. The station truly felt like the listeners had input and control.

And it worked. After launching the station, we were number one in the market in 12 months. We did it by becoming unique.

Let’s discuss how you can become unique. Then, let’s discuss a few organic ways to get more listeners.

BECOME UNIQUE

Start by creating your own style. Be you.

Don’t try to be somebody else. You are best at being you. Nobody can copy you or do it better than you can.

Create your own show structure. There are enough knockoffs. Just because every other podcast does the “lightning round” doesn’t mean you need to do a round as well.

Highlight your sense of humor. Why do your friends hang out with you? Let those characteristics come out on your show.

Tell stories that define your character. Telling stories will allow your listeners to get to know, like and trust you.

Discuss topics that interest you. You become interesting by being interested.

Remove the clichés from your dialogue. Words become clichés, because they are used too much.

Here is the definition of cliché: a trite, stereotyped expression; a sentence or phrase, usually expressing a popular or common thought or idea, that has lost originality, ingenuity, and impact by long overuse.

Clichés are words that have lost their originality. How can you be unique if you have lost your originality?

If you want to sound unique and original, replace your clichés with something fresh.

Avoid these top business clichés:

  • Thinking outside of the box
  • Win-win situation
  • Giving 110%
  • Best Practices
  • Synergy
  • Paradigm Shift
  • Low-hanging fruit
  • Push the envelope
  • Take it to the next level
  • A leading provider of…

When you use the same phrases used by everyone else, you become vanilla and unoriginal.

If you want to be unique, grab a thesaurus and find some new words.

BE MEMORABLE

What can you do on the show this week that hasn’t been done before?

Listen to Dave Jackson on his 400th episode of “School of Podcasting” where he was hi jacked by the Binky & The Wiz morning show. You won’t hear that on any other show.

Some loved it. Some hated it. Everyone that heard it remembered that episode.

Removing every flaw and sterilizing your show will not make it memorable.

Be audacious. Be adventuresome. Be creative. Be boisterous … sometimes. Be tender other times.

Do everything in a way that only you can do it.

Brainstorm until you have something exciting.

SELL THE SIZZLE

People do not buy products. They buy what the product can do for them.

You don’t go to a restaurant to buy a steak. You go the restaurant, because you’re hungry and want one of your favorite dishes. You want that tender piece of meat that you can cut with a butter knife. The one that will just melt in your mouth, because it is the best steak around. It is cooked perfectly.

You are not rushing into the restaurant because the cow was corn-fed and aged to perfection. Who cares. Those are attributes, not benefits.

Does it taste great? Will it fill me up? Does it remind me of the great family dinners we used to have when I was a kid? I’m in. Those are the benefits.

Sell the sizzle, not the steak.

Apple does this really well. When you hear a commercial for Apple, it is about the experience and why they do what they do.

Other computer companies tell you all about the features. Their dual-core processors and RAM. I don’t even know what that means. I just want to be cool like my friends with the iPhone Ten or X or whatever it is.

MARKETING FOLLOWS PRODUCT

Now that we have a great product, how to we get more listeners?

Sure you could buy all of those expensive products or a bunch of Facebook ads. I’m sure they work.

There is an easier way. And, it is free.

Get more listeners by getting involved.

How many podcasts do you listen to that beg you to get involved with the show? Email us. Leave us a voicemail. Post on our Facebook page. Find us on Twitter. Don’t forget that we have a Speakpipe link on the website. Use a carrier pigeon. There are a million ways. Everyone wants engagement.

When you reach out and engage with others, they include you on the show. This does two things.

First, it puts you in front of the audience of that podcast. That could bring a new audience to your show.

Second, through the Law of Reciprocity, the host of the show may be more inclined to engage with your show. A little thank you gesture. What goes around comes around.

Reciprocity in social psychology refers to responding to a positive action with another positive action, rewarding kind actions. When you do something nice for someone, they feel inclined to do something nice for you in return.

Gary Vaynerchuk spends an great deal of time discussing this in his book “Crush It“. It is a great book that I highly recommend.

Gary basically says, “Put your stuff out there. Then, go engage with everyone else.” Be seen. Meet people where THEY live.

Then, be patient.

You won’t get 100,000 listeners immediately. Grow slowly. Adjust and get it right as you progress. Build the foundation.

As Gary says, “Do it again, and again, and again, and again.” Keep engaging. They will come. It only takes your time.

Schedule 30 minutes a day to interact with your audience where they are. You will eventually build the traffic you desire and get more listeners.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

9 Things To Create A Unique Podcast Brand – Episode 179

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9 Things To Create A Unique Podcast Brand – Episode 179

Unique Podcast Brand
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When I began in radio nearly 30 years ago, I began developing my style by copying my mentors. It wasn’t long before I realized I would never stand out by being a cheap imitation. Here are 9 things you can do to create your own unique podcast brand.

Standing out and being unique is critical when creating a memorable brand. Work to get your listeners to remember you. If you want them to come back episode after episode, your show must be memorable.

MY “A-HA MOMENT”

One day early in my career, my program director and I were reviewing my show. During the session, my mentor stopped the tape. She said, “When are you going to stop trying to be everyone else and start being yourself?”

That comment stung a bit. Then, I realized how right she was.

It was that day that she challenged me to get out of my comfort zone and work to become unique. Becoming memorable was the only way I would win. It was the only way I would be a success against all of the other shows in town.

I have worked on my brand for over 25 years. Day in and day out, I work to refine what I do and become memorable for my listeners. My brand has helped me stay on top for over a decade.

Here are nine important steps you can take this week to begin the journey of creating your unique podcast brand.

9 BRANDING STEPS

1. Find your unique selling proposition.

2. Be yourself. You are the best you, and you are unique.

3. Create a style.
– Don’t try to be somebody else. You are best at being you.
– Create you own show structure. There are enough knockoffs.
– Highlight your sense of humor.
– Tell stories that define your character.
– Discuss topics that interest you. Be interesting by being interested.

4. Tell stories. Your history is unique.

5. Incorporate your experience. Your experience is unique.

6. Ask questions others fail to ask.

7. Use a format others don’t use. Develop a different show format.

8. Incorporate production values into your show.

9. Provide great customer service. Make people feel special.

NEED HELP?

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

What The Pros Say About Branding – Episode 170

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What The Pros Say About Branding – Episode 170

Branding Philosophies
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Branding is crucial to the success of your podcast. More importantly, it is critical for your own personal success. Have you defined your brand?

There are some major voices on the subject. I have found ideas from four of my favorite branding experts.

Interestingly, all four have a similar theme … purpose.

Gary Vaynerchuk

From Inc. 8/2/2016

Focus on yourself.

“My game is about me knowing myself.” He only focuses on his content and his audience. He regularly reviews user comments and analyzes important distribution metrics.

Too often we pay attention to what other people are doing and we forget to play our own game. Instead of worrying about others, Vaynerchuk recommended creating more content, engaging your audience and testing your ads.

Simon Sinek

From Start With Why

If Apple were like everyone else, a marketing message from them may sound like this: “We make great computers. They are beautifully designed, simple to use and user friendly. What to buy one?”

Here’s how Apple actually communicates: “Everything we do we believe in challenging the status quo, we believe in thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is by making our products beautifully designed, simple to use, and user friendly. We just happen to make great computers. What to buy one?”

Start with why.

Seth Godin

From Seth’s blog

The brand is a story. But, it’s a story about you, not about the brand.

Every brand has a story. That’s how it goes from being a logo and a name to a brand. The story includes expectations and history and promises and social cues and emotions. The story makes us say we “love Google” or “love Harley” … but what do we really love?

We love ourselves.

We love the memory we have of how that brand made us feel once.

More than ever, we express ourselves with what we buy and how we use what we buy. Extensions of our personality, totems of our selves, reminders of who we are or would like to be.

Great marketers don’t make stuff. They make meaning.

B.J. Bueno

From The Power of Cult Branding – 7 Golden Rules of Cult Branding

Apple is the embodiment of a Cult Brand: a company that commands fanatical loyalty from its customers. Apple’s loyal customers—a group we’ll call Brand Lovers— overwhelmingly tend to choose Apple products exclusively.

Apple’s appeal is certainly not attributable to low prices; that’s not it at all. Instead, Apple is offering their customers something else, something so compelling and irresistible that makes their customers overlook sporadically uneven performance and higher prices.

That’s the power of Cult Branding. And Apple’s not the only one using the power of Cult Branding.

Simply put, Cult Brands always give back. They never forget that the relationship needs to be mutually beneficial. Brand Lovers need to get just as much (or even more) out of the relationship than the Cult Brand does.

With this in mind, the leaders of Cult Brands are adamant about continually finding new ways to show love and appreciation for the passion and devotion of their customers. Unlike faceless corporations, Cult Brands are humble and personable. They never take their customers for granted. They look for tangible ways to say thank you.

 

The Books

These are four of my favorite authors on the subject of branding. If you have a chance, grab any of these books. I think you’ll enjoy the read and find them useful.

Gary Vaynerchuk – Crush It

Simon Sinek – Start With Why

Seth Godin – Purple Cow

Seth Godin – Tribes

B.J. Bueno – The Power of Cult Branding

 

Mentioned in this episode:

Podcast Talent Coach Worksheet Library

Podcast Talent Coach Coaching

 

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

What Your Podcast Brand Can Learn From Prince – Episode 137

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What Your Podcast Brand Can Learn From Prince – Episode 137

We are making a quick change this week. On the last episode, I told you we were going to get into interviewing. We will do that next week.

When I heard Prince had passed away, I started getting fascinated by the way people were reacting to the loss of one of the greatest musical artists of our time. I had to jump back in the studio and cut a new episode for this week. We’ll pick up the interviewing episodes next week.

Why did the death of Prince affect so many so deeply?

Prince created a brand that epitomizes the Cult Brand that we talk so much about.

I was talking with a friend this week. He was deeply touched by Prince’s death. He said it bothered him much more than Michael Jackson or Whitney Houston or Merle Haggard, and he couldn’t figure out why.

Prince has been on my mind quite a bit lately. I am a fan of most of what he created. There are musicians. Then, there are artists.

Everything Prince touched was some form or art, pushing the boundaries.

In his movie “Under The Cherry Moon”, he included a bit that almost predicted his death. At the end of the movie, Prince’s character Christopher Tracy dies and early death. The scene is set to a song by Prince called “Sometimes It Snows In April”. It is very coincidental that Prince was taken from us early, in April, almost 30 years to the date of the release of “Under The Cherry Moon”, which came out July 4th, 1986.

The death of Prince hurts many more than a typical celebrity death due to our association with the brand Prince created.

We talk a lot about the Cult Brand. It was defined in the book “The Power Of Cult Branding” by BJ Bueno. If you look at Prince’s brand, you will see all 7 attributes of a Cult Brand. These are characteristics you do not find with Michael Jackson or Whitney Houston or Merle Haggard. We came to expect those 3 to be in trouble. They weren’t one of us. Prince seemed like a guy we could hang out with. He had a bit of cool about him.

CULT BRAND

Let’s review the 7 attributes of a Cult Brand. We will see how they relate to Prince. Then, we can see how they can be used with your Podcast brand.

SOCIAL GROUPS

Let them be different together. Those people who didn’t quite fit in due to their style found solace in the music and style of Prince. His concerts and nightclub allowed those fans to gather and be different together.

Oddly enough, Prince’s music is not found on YouTube. Prince wanted to keep his community special. You could choose to be involved. However, you needed to be involved his way. He controlled the message.

Find ways for your audience to be different together. What does your podcast offer that is unique to you? This needs to be something that is different than any other podcast and done in a way that only you can do it.

Once you create the difference, allow your audience to come together to share that difference.

COURAGE

Prince stood by his beliefs. He insisted on owning his publishing. He even went as far as changing his name to a symbol when his fight with Warner Brothers Records got crazy.

The musical styles of Prince fused rock guitar solos with funk and rhythm and blues. He threw in some dance moves of James Brown to his unique style of dress. He had the courage to be different and stand out.

Being different and standing out from the crowd takes courage. Be daring this week. Find something that will put your podcast on the map. It may be scary and outside of your comfort zone. That is ok. Give it a try. People will take notice.

PROMOTE A LIFESTYLE – FUN

In the 1980s, Prince created a style of dress that was unique to him. It was copied by many. It was self-expression and fun. Prince promoted a lifestyle. Love, fun and style. Even his guitars were fun and unique.

After his musical success, Prince created other ways to spread his brand of fun. He created a few movies. Some of these were huge successes. Some barely broke even.

Prince created his own nightclub. He fostered the careers of other artists. Fun was a primary attribute of his brand. Something we all wanted to be part of.

With your podcast, don’t be so serious all the time. Have fun. Be crazy. Let your inner child out to play every now and then. Life is too short to be so serious all the time.

LISTEN TO YOUR CUSTOMERS – HUMAN NEEDS

Humans have a need to come together. Music is a big part of that need. Prince gave it to his fans. In the 1980s when the economy was tough, Prince was singing about love and a carefree life. He delivered what his fans needed to escape their everyday life.

What does your podcast audience need? Find that need and fulfill it regularly. If you don’t know what that need is, ask your listeners. Find their Facebook pages and look for the need. It will be there.

SUPPORT COMMUNITIES – START A CULT

Prince didn’t always need to spotlight. He would make some headlines, release an album or movie, then lay low for a while. This allowed his fans to embrace and spread the message.

He also turned many fledgling Minneapolis musical acts into stars. Being part of the Revolution or New Power Generation was as easy as joining the movement.

Even the biggest hits of Prince featured vocals of other members in his band. In “1999”, Prince is the 3rd voice. In his movie “Purple Rain“, it is portrayed that the title song was actually written by Wendy and Lisa, members of the band. Prince included everyone and shared the attention and credit.

With your podcast, share the credit. Give. Make others the star. The more you shine your spotlight on others, the more it will come back to you. Simply focus on helping others. Bring your fans together. Introduce your listeners to each other. Spread the love. When you do that, your message will begin to spread on the wings of others.

OPENESS – INCLUSIVE, INVITING

Anyone could be part of the Prince movement. Dress like him. Move like him. He promoted love and being part of a movement. People could relate to that.

Be inviting with your podcast. Allow your listeners to direct a bit of your content. Give them some ownership in the content you create.
You also need to make it easy to join your tribe. Eliminate a lot of the hoops and just get them into the party.

PROMOTE PERSONAL FREEDOM

Prince used his style to promote his own personal freedom. Then, he encouraged others to do the same. He always insisted that he have complete creative control over everything he did.

We all have an enemy. When you find the common enemy, your brand can help your listener fight the common bad. Create the freedom. Do you think it is a coincidence that listeners on the Dave Ramsey Show become debt free? Their debt free scream is followed by a loud yell of “freedom”. All of the listeners are fighting the common enemy. That is personal freedom.

We can learn a lot from the brand of Prince. Add these 7 attributes of a cult brand into your podcast. You will begin to create a powerful tribe that will drive your brand to new heights.

 

Next week, we begin the series on interviewing. Have you ever conducted that interview that went nowhere? The one you felt like deleting right after it was over? We can help. Next week, we will answer a couple listener questions about getting the most out of your interview guest.

 

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

9 Uncommon Books That Shaped My Podcast – Episode 120

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9 Uncommon Books That Shaped My Podcast – Episode 120

9 UNCOMMON BOOKS

We are all looking for great books and inspiration. In the online business space, the same books are often recommended and discussed. Godin. Ries & Trout. Think & Grow Rich. Those are the must-reads to be in the game.

Lesser known books can often offer powerful information and inspiration. They can also help you stand out from the crowd.

When I started in radio 25 years ago, I would read all I could about radio and business. I read the big books of the industry to keep up with the crowd. Those books were the center of many discussions at industry gatherings.

After I began programming my first radio station in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1995, I quickly realized keeping up with the crowd wasn’t going to put me ahead of the crowd.

To win, we need to think differently. To get ahead, we need to be willing to do what others will not. Find motivation and inspiration where others haven’t looked.

As you are trying to create a podcast that is unique and entertaining, one that will stand out and attract a following, take a chance on a few new ideas. Find a few nuggets that keep your heart pumping. Be a champion for a different way of thinking.

Here are few books that have inspired me. These books are not the typical fare you hear mentioned in every keynote speech. You won’t find these titles at the center of cocktail party discussions … unless you make it so.

However, these books have useful information you can put to work in your podcast and online business today. You can use these ideas to spark your creativity.

Find one book that looks exciting and inspiring to you. Give it a read. Maybe you’ll find your own wonderful spark of an idea.

THE POWER OF CULT BRANDING – HOW 9 MAGNETIC BRANDS TURNED CUSTOMERS INTO LOYAL FOLLOWERS (AND YOURS CAN, TOO!) – BJ Bueno and Matthew Ragas

This book covers the 7 rules of cult branding. As examples, the book explores the success of brands like Star Trek, Oprah Winfrey, Apple, Jimmy Buffett and Linux.

I love this book, because it explains the characteristics of brands that truly stand out from the crowd. These brands have created cult-like followings. The book gets me excited about what is possible.

PLATFORM – GET NOTICED IN A NOISY WORLD – Michael Hyatt

Michael Hyatt has a successful blog, podcast and membership site. In this book, he explores how to create a leverage your platform.

If you are in online business, this is a great read. I find another takeaway each time I read the book. This work is like a “how to” guide.

BEYOND POWERFUL RADIO – Valerie Gellar

Valerie dives into the characteristics of successful radio. These principles can also be applied to podcasting. From Valerie, I learned to never be boring. She says, “There is no such thing as too long, only too boring.”

THE MILLIONAIRE MESSENGER – MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND A FORTUNE SHARING YOUR ADVICE – Brendon Burchard

This book provides the steps to take to create your business. The process begins with selecting your area of expertise and ends with finding promotional partners and repeating the process.

It is an easy read. The book is the foundation of Brendon’s teachings. His work has really shaped my online approach.

MILLION DOLLAR COACHING – BUILD A WORLD-CLASS PRACTICE BY HELPIING OTHERS SUCCEED – Alan Weiss

If you coach, this book will help you build your process of finding clients.

This book was first recommended by Dan Miller of 48Days.com. Alan provides a great process to finding clients, converting leads and turning your coaching into a real business.

CIGARS, WHISKEY & WINNING – LEADERSHIP LESSONS FROM GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT – Al Kaltman

This book is full of great tips on management, overcoming obstacles, focus and competition. The lessons come from the actual events in the life of Ulysses S. Grant. It is an incredibly inspirational read.

THE KNACK – HOW STREET-SMART ENTREPRENEURS LEARN TO HANDLE WHATEVER COMES UP – Norm Brodsky and Bo Burlingham

This book discusses why start-ups fail, how to make sales and how to keep customers. Norm created a few businesses in New York City. He was also a contributor to INC. magazine. The lessons in the book come from his real-world experience and not simply theory.

THE E-MYTH REVISITED – WHY MOST SMALL BUSINESSES DON’T WORK AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT – Michael E. Gerber

This is probably the most popular book on this list. For the small business owner, this is a must-read. Learn to work on your business and not simply in your business. The lesson is fundamental for small business success.

CASH IN A FLASH – REAL MONEY IN NO TIME – Mark Victor Hansen and Robert G. Allen

This book shows you how to think differently to create quick cash, and then turn that cash into more cash. The lessons require action and courage. The book is creative in its storytelling.

 

I hope these books give you a bit of inspiration as you continue to grow your business. There should be at least one piece to spark some creativity for you.

Let me know what one you use. E-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Podcast Resources – Episode 117

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Podcast Resources – Episode 117

Podcast Resources

(These tools can be found on the resource page at PodcastTalentCoach.com. Most links on that page are affiliate links. I receive a variable commission for all purchases made using those links. If you would like to support the show, please take advantage of some of these resources.)

I have recently received questions from listeners looking to launch a podcast in 2016. I thought this would be a good time to review the tools I use to in my business. This includes the tools I use to create my podcast, website and newsletter. We will also review the resources I use to learn, grow and develop.

This episode is an encore presentation of an earlier episode you may have missed. If you did catch it last time, let this serve as inspiration and a little refresher.

I have been using most of these resources for at least 24 months. Some have been used longer. A couple tools are more recent. For the most part, I have been a long-time user and have been quite happy with each of them. That is why I feel confident recommending them to you. You can find affiliate links to most of these online at PodcastTalentCoach.com.

COACHING RESOURCE

This list doesn’t include much technical information, such as mixers, processors and software. I leave that to Dave Jackson at the School of Podcasting. He is the tech expert that helps me. If you are looking for help setting up the studio, Dave is your guy. He leads off my resources.

TECHNICAL TOOLS

A few technical tools from my studio include my mic, my mac and a few web tools.

My studio mic is an ElectroVoice RE20. This runs about $450. It is a high quality mic. This mic is probably much more than a beginning podcaster needs. However, if you are serious about podcasting, this is a great mic.

My backup mic is a Audio-Technica ATR-2100. It is a quality USB mic for the money. This costs around $60.

For editing, I use Adobe Audition in the studio. I will occasionally use Garage Band for quick projects or when I’m traveling.

I use a Mac Book Pro 13” for the flexibility. I cost me $1,200.

My mp3s are tagged with ID3 Editor from PA Software. The price tag was $15.

I host my audio with Libsyn. It runs $20/month.

My URLs were purchased through GoDaddy. The price really depends on the URL. You can usually find a deal. After the initial deal, I pay about $45/year.

I have a website on Homestead and one on Host Gator with WordPress. Homestead is a stand alone site builder. Host Gator just hosts my WordPress site. Homestead is $20/month. HostGator is $135/year, just over $11/month. WordPress is free.

On my website, I use Paypal for my transactions. Most of my providers accept it. Plus, they have a card option for my customers.

I use Aweber for my newsletter. It is $196/year. Just over $16/month. I looked at Mail Chimp. Both are very similar services if you have a list under 5,000.

Canva.com is a decent resource for creating graphics. They have a decent photo library as well. Most photos are about $1/photo.

I self-published my workbook through Create Space, an Amazon company. You simply upload a .pdf. It is fairly simple to use. Not very expensive. They also sell the workbook through Amazon and converted it to Kindle.

I am in the process of creating a membership portal through WishList Member. $297. They have solid training videos. I am not yet complete with this one.

LEARNING TOOLS

Dan Miller and 48Days.com is where it all started. He has great tools to help you find your passion and the work you love.

Internet Business Mastery is a great podcast and course that have helped me refine my business focus. Jeremy & Jason have been there and done it.

Michael Hyatt has a great membership site with Platform University. It is based on his book Platform, which is a must read as you develop your podcast. There is great learning inside the community. He only opens membership a couple times a year for enrollment. I got in early on this one and haven’t looked back since.

Audible.com has turned my car into a mobile classroom. I am usually listening to a couple books a month on top of the podcasts. You can get a free book when you use my affiliate link on the resources page.

Most of all, I cannot say enough about Dave Jackson and the School of Podcasting. If you want to learn the technical nuts and bolts, check out his course, membership and training tools.

You can find affiliate links to most of these online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. I would appreciate the support if you choose to use any of these links and great products.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

How Do I Market My Podcast ? – Episode 114

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How Do I Market My Podcast ? – Episode 114

Answering listener questions

Thank you for allowing me to help you with your podcast. I get a great deal of joy helping podcasters achieve their goals.

A few weeks ago, I asked you for questions and ways I can help you with your show. I received some great questions from you. This week, I want to go through a few with you.

How do you market your show? How can I get to the point of launch? How do I fight the Impostor Syndrome? How do I name my podcast?

I’m struggling with promotion/marketing and spreading the word.
-Greg from the “I Want To Know” podcast

There are many ways to market and promote. Most of it takes time.

I learned a lot about marketing from Paige Nienaber from CPR Promotions. He often refers to this drip style of marketing as dog crap marketing.

Paige lives in Minnesota, where it snows a lot every year. The ground is typically covered with snow from November to March.

Paige also owns a dog. If you are a dog owner, you know all about cleaning the back yard. The dog makes deposits. You clean it up.

Just because there is snow on the ground doesn’t mean the dog doesn’t need to go out to do his business. It just makes it tougher to clean up.

When the snow finally melts in March, you find the results of all the hard work of your dog. It wasn’t done in a few days. It built up slowly over months of productive work by the dog.

The same is true for your marketing. Work on it daily and let the results build over time.

Here are six tips you can use.

1. Know your most frequent listeners by name and use them.
2. Use stories to stand out and be remembered.
3. Host events to create community.
4. Make it easy to share your content.
5. Don’t blow your first impression.
6. Write great show notes with helpful links that your audience can use.

You can find a worksheet of 52 podcast marketing tips at PodcastTalentCoach.com.

I am a beginner, not even live yet, in fact having problems getting from intro, outro, episode and artwork to live. So frustrating, feeling like I am THIS close.
– Corrine

This is a matter of finding the courage to launch. Fight the impostor syndrome. Learn as you go.

If you have your intro, outro, episode notes and artwork, you are ready to go live.

Create a WordPress site and sign up for a Libsyn account. This should put you in a great position to launch.

If it is belief in yourself that is holding you back, take baby steps. Record three episodes telling yourself you won’t really post these. You are just practicing. Get them recorded.

Once you have the episodes recorded, put them on Libsyn and post to your WordPress site to ensure the technology works. Test the links. Listen to the shows. Submit it to iTunes. Just tell yourself you can always change it if necessary.

After you are sure everything works, move on to the next few episodes. Changing those first three episodes is posible. However, it is more work. I think once you get them posted, you will be more excited and interested in working on the next few episodes rather than tinkering with the first three. Move forward in baby steps.

If it is the technology that is holding you back, check out Dave Jackson at the School of Podcasting. He has great tutorials that will help you create a website, set up a Libsyn account and submit your show to iTunes. He also has a great offer where he will set up your site if you order your hosting through him.

Dave always says if you can post on Facebook, you can create a website with WordPress and launch a podcast. Don’t let the intimidation stop you. There are many resources that can help.

I want to launch a show I can be proud of. I quickly get into my own head and get slapped down by the Nobody’s Going to Like This Fairy. Stupid fairy. Any tips for shutting that voice up?
– Greg

I began my broadcasting career when I was 19. It was completely by accident. I was going to college to get my architecture degree. Since I was 12-years-old, I had been tailoring my education to be an architect or engineer.

In college, I had the same fear of public speaking as most people. In our design classes, we had to do presentations in front of a panel of judges. I absolutely hated doing these presentations.

During class, four or five students would present during the hour. It would take about a week to get through the entire class. That was the worst part. The anxiety would build for presentation day only to not get your name called. I would have to live through the anxiety again in anticipation of presenting during the next class.

I never envisioned being a public speaker, radio talent or any other presenter.

My younger brother worked for a radio station at the time. I was home for the weekend doing nothing like most college students. That was when the phone rang. It was the manager of the radio station looking for my brother to fill in during a shift. My brother wasn’t home and I was offered a part-time job.

My career in radio started just running the board for long-form programs. I only talked on the radio between the 30-minute shows. I might give the time or temperature. Otherwise, I would sit around while the show played. Speaking was minimal.

As an elective for my architecture degree, I took a class called “Broadcasting For The Non-Major”. I figured being in a radio station for a part-time job should make this class a little easier. It would also help me learn more about my job.

That class eventually led me to become the music director of the college station.

That position got me a job working overnights at a commercial station. Suddenly, I instantly found myself talking to 10,000 people. I was no longer talking between long-form programs to a handful of old people. This was real radio.

Over time, I started to get comfortable talking on the radio. It took a little time. I eventually got there.

As I started picking up more hours on the air, my boss started to send me out broadcasting live in front of a crowd. I was being sent onstage to introduce concerts in front of 10,000 people. These were no longer people I couldn’t see. They were right in front of me.

It took me years to figure out how to overcome those butterflies I would get each time I stepped in front of a crowd. There were tips and tricks I learned along the way to help me. It was a combination of things I learned over the years that helped me defeat the jitters. Here are a few ways to shake the butterflies out of your system. It could save you years of trial and error.

Preparation is the key idea in the process.

Here are four steps to properly prepare for your show.

1. Overcome Jitters
– Prepare your material
– Rehearse
– Focus on one person – preferably your single target listener you have defined
– Tell yourself you are an expert at your opinion
– Making people either love you or hate you only means you are making people care.

2. Create Great Notes
– Bullet points – don’t script
– Tell stories
– Give examples – play audio
– Determine your open and close, intro and outro for show and each topic … “now it’s time for” is not an appropriate intro

3. Set the Room
– Get the temp correct – be comfortable
– Get some room temp water
– No distractions – phone, family

4. Prepare Your Equipment
– Close other programs
– Prepare your software
– Turn off your phone, close e-mail, close IM
– Test your mic and set your levels
Contact and prepare guests & co-hosts

The places I am struggling with my future podcast is mainly the what to name it. I have ideas for about 3 different podcasts (though I only want to start with one). The main problem is naming them also i.e. website name and so forth. I have an idea about formats but with never having done a podcast, they seem to escape me. I know I won’t be perfect at first and I am okay with that. But at the same time I would like to be somewhat in order. A little more guidance on this would be greatly appreciated.
– Richard

The name of your podcast sets up your brand. It should tell people exactly what they will get from your show. Don’t get cute.

If you name your show “Outside the Lines”, nobody will know if that is a show about paint-by-numbers, football or off roading. “School of Podcasting” is pretty clear. You know what you are going to get.

Take five minutes and brainstorm. Start writing every name you can think of that relates to your niche. There are no bad ideas here. Every idea will lead to another. Don’t critique. Just write as much as you can.

After the five minutes is up, review the list. Highlight the names you like.

These names should be clear about your content. Find names that capture the imagination. Look for names that sound interesting.

Once you have narrowed the list to five to ten names, ask others for their opinion. Explain the criteria of a great name. Have them give you their top three choices.

Read over the five or ten lists of three. Look for the names that get the most mentions.

Now, take action. Pick a name and run with it.

What is the worst that can happen? You get a year into it and need to adjust it. That’s ok. On a podcast the other day, I heard someone say, “If you wait until all of the stoplights turn green before you begin your journey, you’ll never start.”

Just begin. Don’t wait for things to be perfect. That will never happen. Just start.
Thanks for all of the questions. If you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Magic of the Taylor Swift Brand – Episode 113

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The Magic of the Taylor Swift Brand – Episode 113

Taylor Swift

Are you looking to make your brand stand out from the rest?

It is possible. However, it takes a lot of work.

Famous college basketball coach Bobby Knight once said, “Everyone wants to be a champion, but few want to do the work it takes to be a champion.”

Taylor Swift is one of those people willing to do the work. I think you can learn a lot from the Taylor Swift brand when creating your own.

She has done amazing work over the past 10 years. Regardless of your musical preferences, it is hard not to admire the empire she has created.

Taylor Swift was recently in town for a pair of concerts. This was the fourth time I’ve had the pleasure of meeting her. She never fails to amaze me with her networking abilities.

There are four things you can learn by studying the brand Taylor has created.

1. KNOW WHEN TO LAUNCH

Now 25 years old, Taylor moved to Nashville when she was 14. She was determined to get a record deal when most 8th graders are just figuring out middle school. She knocked on doors until someone opened.

Even though she got a record deal at 14, she didn’t experience immediate success. Taylor wrote, recorded and learned the business for two years before her first album was even released.

Taylor Swift took her time to learn what she needed to know. When her record label felt the time was right, they launched her.

Lesson: Learning is important, but at some point you have to launch.

2. BE DARING & DIFFERENT

Taylor Swift broke the mold. Kids simply didn’t have hits on country radio. She dared to do the unthinkable. By not giving up, she eventually found a record label willing to give it a try.

The accomplishments Taylor has achieved are impressive. She is the youngest songwriter to ever sign with Sony/ATV Music Publishing, one of the largest in the world. She is the youngest person to have ever write and perform a #1 song by themselves. Her 2nd album “Fearless” made her the youngest Album of the Year Grammy winner.

Taylor Swift has only released 5 albums. Even so, she is the only artist to have 3 albums sell more than one million copies in the opening release week. That mark is even more impressive in today’s music world on digital downloads when people are buying single songs over albums.

With her latest album “1989”, Taylor left the world of country music to release a pop album. People thought she was crazy. She took the daring leap and sold over a million copies in the first week of release. It was also named one of the best albums of the year by magazines Rolling Stone, Time and others.

By daring to be different, people take notice.

Lesson: Do what others are scared to attempt.

3. PUT IN THE WORK

Taylor Swift has many, many other awards. One of her attributes that make her so successful is the fact that she is willing to do things few others are willing to do. She goes above and beyond.

When was the last time you sent a hand-written thank you note?

I’ve had the great fortune of meeting many big names in the music business. Justin Timberlake, George Strait, Ozzy Osborne, Christina Aguilera, Blake Shelton, Metallica. It is one of the perks of the business.

The Program Director of a radio station decides which songs make it on the radio station. Artists usually want to take time to meet the person who holds the keys. They understand a handshake can go a long way.

Most stop there.

A typical meet & greet at a concert is in a converted locker room and resembles a cattle call. People wait in line making their way around the room until they reach the artist.

“Thanks for being here. Let’s get a photo. Enjoy the show.”

Taylor is different.

Instead of a locker room, Taylor sets up a “tea party” or a “loft” party backstage, complete with soda machines, photo booths, high top tables, boas, other party accessories and a professional photographer. VIP guests hang out, eat munchies and get ready for the show.

Instead of the handshake and photo op, Taylor makes her way around the room coming to each VIP for a photo and minute to chat.
It is obviously different from every other experiences.

It is what happens a week later that really sets Taylor apart.

About a week after the concert, I received a hand-written note from Taylor thanking me for taking the time to bring my family to the show and for the support. Nobody does that, especially the biggest stars in music.

Inside of my note was another hand-written note. This one was for my daughter. That note thanked my daughter for coming to the show. Taylor encouraged my daughter to stick with her piano lessons. She went on to tell my daughter to tell her friend Ellory (who was also with us) “hi”.

The details Taylor included were amazing. I’m not sure if she has a photographic memory, if she video tapes the event to review later, if someone close by takes notes, or if there is some other magic involved. It really doesn’t matter.

What does matter is the fact that Taylor takes the time to ensure it all happens. That attention to details makes her stand out from every other artist. She is willing to do the extra work.

Lesson: Do the things that others are not willing to do that will make you stand out.

4. SURROUND YOURSELF WITH HELP

After a typical meet & greet, the artist typically sends you on your way.

Instead of sending you to your seat, Taylor sent us on a backstage tour led by her mom, Andrea.

Mama Swift led out around the backstage area telling us all about the stage and production. We saw the hydraulics under the stage. We saw the cases and trucks that transport the gear. We saw the costumes Taylor wore. She took us to the tour busses Taylor uses for the band and dancers.

At the end of the tour, Taylor’s mom took us directly to our seats. It was the kind of customer service you don’t typically receive from average businesses.

As Taylor’s mom is leading us around backstage, Taylor is freed up to handle the other pre-show duties on her list. She needs to meet those in her fan club. She needs to warm up her voice. I’m sure there are a few other things in her routine before the show begins. The amazing team Taylor has assembled helps her be the best she can be.
Lesson: Find great people that can help you.

YOUR BRAND

As you create your brand, be willing to do the work it takes to be a champion.

Know when to launch. Be daring and different. Put in the work. Surround yourself with others who will help you reach your goals.

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

A Simple Way To Improve Your Show That Works For Every Professional Broadcaster – Episode 112

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A Simple Way To Improve Your Show That Works For Every Professional Broadcaster – Episode 112

8 Questions To Better Podcasts

Do you want to be the best? Do you want to move forward quickly?

Broadcasters learn early in their career that there is one primary way to get better. One well-worn path to improvement. A method used by nearly every broadcaster that has come before.

It is a tactic still used today. It is not only used by professional broadcasters, but used by world class athletes, writers, dancers, musicians, and others throughout most highly visible and well-paid professions in the world.

They all use a coach.

You see coaches everywhere. Life coaches. Career coaches. Sport coaches. Birthing coaches. Speaker coaches. Executive coaches. It seems coaching is a big part of the world today. Why is that.

Coaching is prevalent in our society, because coaching works. Coaching gets results.

Coaching works, because your coach helps you reach your goals when you can’t push yourself. Coaching helps you face difficult truths, learn how to make powerful change and maximize your potential.

The best speakers, the best executives and the best athletes all have coaches. Coaching helps the best become the best and stay at the top. Coaching is a powerful, secret weapon of those at the top of their game.

You can work tirelessly to learn on your own. Or, you can enlist the help of a coach and reach your goals much quicker.

I offer a free podcast review to serious podcasters who wish to get better. Why free? Because nearly every podcaster who talks with me for 30 minutes about their show instantly sees the benefit. They leave the session with a list of things to transform their podcast and business in a week. Because it works, most want more. They sign up for a quick program.

You can find the link at PodcastTalentCoach.com.

How can a coach help you take your podcast to the top? There are five areas where a coach can help you. A coach will help you assess your current situation and see the big picture. Your coach will help you develop your goals and plan. You will be held accountable by your coach. You will have your own personal cheerleader. Finally, your coach will provide regular feedback to help you with improvement.

THE BIG PICTURE

A coach will help you assess your current situation and see the big picture. Sometimes it helps to have another set of eyes helping you see the forrest through the trees. A great coach will help you clear away all the clutter to gain clear focus for your show.

A personal coach will help you honestly assess your strengths and weaknesses. These assessments are specific to your show. Your coach is not simply offering cookie cutter prescriptions. Once you understand your strengths and weaknesses, you can capitalize on the strengths and minimize the weaknesses.

You get a different perspective on your show when you have someone else give you honest feedback. When you look at your content in a different way, you will discover new ideas and different approaches for your content. A different perspective helps you keep the end goal in mind.

A big picture view of your podcast will also help you balance your life. Your coach can make sure you don’t devote all of your time to one area of your life. Ensuring you are spending quality time on all areas of your life and business could be one of the most important benefits of a coach.

GOAL DEVELOPMENT

Your coach will help you develop your goals and a plan to achieve those goals. What do you hope to accomplish with your podcast? How does your show fit into your overall business plan? Does your podcast include a clear call to action. Your coach can help you develop each of those areas.

A dream becomes a goal when deadlines are attached. Your coach can help you set those deadlines. Your coach can then help you develop a plan reach those goals.

Setting goals help you maximize your potential. You can be your best when you set and achieve goals on a regular basis. Your coach can help keep you accountable to those goals.

ACCOUNTABILITY

Some people need a little extra push to remain focused on the task at hand. Your coach can help hold you accountable to your goals. The best part of that accountability is the goals are your goals. It is your agenda. Your coach is simply helping you achieve the goals you have set.

With regular communication, your coach can push you to do your best. Your coach can help you keep your goals top of mind. When you don’t feel like spending that extra hour making your podcast the best it can be, your coach can give you that little, extra motivation. You can use your coach to push you as much as you would like.

Consistency is key to a successful podcast. Your coach can keep you on track. When your coach holds you accountable, you produce great content on a regular basis. Consistency produces a reliable, trusted brand. Let your coach help you achieve that quality with accountability.

CHEERLEADER

Fear and self doubt prevent many people from achieving their goals. We all have a little critic inside our head telling us we aren’t quite good enough or we do not have the authority to succeed. The impostor syndrome destroys far too many great business ideas.

When you have a coach, you will have your own personal cheerleader. Your coach will help you build self-confidence. You will have the courage to explore topics and ideas on your show that you previously avoided. Your coach will help you voice your opinion and be confident in your beliefs. You will overcome your fears and truly believe in yourself.

You will develop self-confidence when your coach helps you improve your competence.

FEEDBACK

Finally, your coach will provide regular feedback to help you with improvement. Feedback will help you improve your competence. Nobody knows everything. Collaboration helps everyone learn. New ideas, new approaches and new contacts all come from great collaboration. A great coach can help you achieve that improvement.

A great coach will share knowledge and expertise with you that will help you discover new ideas and concepts. It is difficult to improve when you don’t know what you don’t know. A coach can use years of experience to help you discover new processes and information.

You can transform your mistakes into opportunities and learn to do things better with the help of a coach. A great coach has worked with many others allowing you to benefit from the trials and errors of many others. Your coach knows what has worked for others. There is a fountain of knowledge with your coach that you can access for the benefit of your show.

Your coach will also provide specific feedback regarding your podcast. This feedback will include actionable items. You can isolate the areas of your podcast that need improvement. Your coach will help you create an improvement plan for those areas.

You cannot simply remove the negative parts of your show. You must discover the effective parts of your podcast and figure out how to create more of those opportunities. This is where a great coach can help you succeed. A great coach will help you discover the parts of your show that are strong, help you develop a plan to create those moments more often, and then find the courage to present those moments during your podcast.

Coaching works. That is why it is everywhere in our society. Find a great podcast coach to help you reach your goals. Though I would love to help you, your coach doesn’t necessarily need to be me. You simply need to find someone with some experience that can provide a different perspective on your show.

I help podcasters refine their content and transform their information into engaging entertainment. I can help you as well.

Many podcasters let self-doubt derail their efforts. They feel like they are kids playing dress-up among other professional podcasters that have been doing it for years. Those podcasters haven’t learned how to properly structure a show, prepare the content or review the podcast. The impostor syndrome creeps in and they lose faith in their abilities.

It happened to me when I began in broadcasting 25 years ago. There were so many great broadcasters that came before me. Who was I to be on the radio? What did I know about broadcasting? Over two-and-a-half decades, I’ve learned the secrets of the great broadcasters to overcome that fear to create powerful relationships with my listeners.

I’ve helped many broadcaster and podcasters over the years. Many have reached the top of their game. My own personal radio show has been #1 over 80% of the time. I know what works, and it isn’t the big radio voice and cheesy lines you heard on the radio 20 years ago. This is a new era. It is a relationship era. It is time to use your podcast to create meaningful, powerful, profitable relationships with your listeners.

I can help you create those relationships using these five coaching areas. I can help you assess your current situation and see the big picture. Together, we will develop your goals and plan. You will be held accountable to your own agenda. You will have your own personal cheerleader. Finally, you will receive regular feedback to help you with improvement. Are you ready for a coach?

If you feel you could benefit from my help, e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. We can collaborate on a plan to crate a powerful podcast.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

3 Key Elements To A Rockstar Podcast Brand – Episode 108

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3 Key Elements To A Rockstar Podcast Brand – Episode 108

Taylor Swift

Why is a brand so important for your podcast? Your brand communicates the essence of you, your podcast, your business and everything you represent.

There are many, many definitions of a brand. Basically, it is your identity.

When people think of you and your podcast, what comes to mind? There are usually a couple words that your brand represents in the mind of the consumer.

Apple is Think Different. Nike is Just Do It. Ford is Built Ford Tough.

Those brands are more than just slogans. They mean something to the consumer. Different is part of the fabric that makes up Apple. Everything they do is different.

Many companies try to add slogans thinking it will become their brand identity. Most of the time, the words just become throw away tag lines.

IBM is currently using “building a smarter planet” as their slogan. What does that mean? There are many articles written on the brilliance of this campaign. However, most of the writing centers around the cool logo, the social aspect of the idea and Watson, the mega computer. How does that change my life? What’s in it for me? How am I smarter because of that slogan?

An iPod is different. The iOS platform is different. Apple is different. When I interact with the product, I am different as well. We can be different together.

“Different together” is one element of a cult brand as described by B.J. Bueno in “The Power of Cult Branding”. We’ve discussed that in a past episode.

I truly enjoy studying branding. When I was completing my M.B.A., I studies branding all I could. I have read many books on branding in addition to “Cult Branding.” Those include “The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding” by Ries & Ries and “Brand Like a Rock Star” by Steve Jones.

“Different together” brings us to the first element of a successful brand.

Consistent

To create a solid brand, you need to be consistent. Consistent with your message. Consistent with your promise. Consistent with your image.

When you think of great brands like McDonald’s, Coca Cola and Nike, you can see the evidence of solid consistency. When you walk into McDonald’s, you know exactly what you will get. You’ll get inexpensive hamburgers fast.

It doesn’t matter if it is a McDonald’s in Missoula, Montana or Mexico City, Mexico. The brand will be the same. You may be experience some small differences in the menu. For the most part, you’ll still get hamburgers, french fries and a Coke.

And of course the Big Mac. If you head into a McDonald’s and suddenly find fish n chips or bratwurst as the main entree, your trust in the brand will be destroyed. You won’t be sure what you’ll get next time you visit.

Your podcast must be just as consistent in order to create a great brand. Your listener must know exactly what they will get each time they listen. They come to your show to receive your promise. Deliver every time. Deliver consistently.

Consistency doesn’t mean lack of variety. It simply means that you always deliver your promise. McDonald’s offers different sizes. They offer chicken and fish sandwiches. You can get McNuggets. Either way, it is always inexpensive food fast when you want it. And the burgers are always there.

You are creating a brand when you are creating your podcast. You need to deliver consistently each time your listener tunes into the show. Foster that strong relationship with your audience. Be consistent.

Benefits

Your podcast should contain some sort of call to action. You might ask the listener to visit your website. You may ask them to contribute to a cause. Selling your product is a definite possibility. Simply tuning in again is a call to action. Whatever it happens to be, the call to action is part of the relationship building process with your listener.

In your call to action, be sure to sell benefits, not features. If you are selling a cookbook, the large print, stain-free cover and fact that it will stay open are all features. The ease at which the cook can read the book at a distance, the way it will stay clean to hand down to the next generation and the hands-free help it provides are all benefits. People don’t buy products. They buy what the product will accomplish.

How often does Starbuck’s promote their fine coffee bean. The answer is very little. Starbuck’s spends their time creating the Starbuck’s experience. They market the way Starbuck’s makes you feel. They aren’t promoting the warmth, color and robust flavor of their coffee.

Starbuck’s creates a relationship and true experience. They sell the way the coffee experience makes you feel. It is the barista, the smell, the music, the drink names, the cup, the sleeve, and even the lid. It isn’t warm, dark caffeinated beverages.

Find the true benefits of your podcast and product. Then, promote them heavily. People buy benefits.

Last week, we discussed changing your show introduction to better reflect your benefits.

Unique

Great brands are unique. Not simply a different shade of gray, but truly unique. To be remembered, you must stand out.

You stand out when you are loved. You are remembered when you are hated. You fade into the background when you are plain, vanilla and trying to avoid upsetting anyone. If you don’t stir strong emotions, you are easily forgotten.

When we create, we expose our perspective. We open ourselves to criticism. It is natural to want your thoughts, views, art and creation to be accepted by everyone. To avoid being disappointed, we often play it safe.

Those fantastic, memorable brands are usually both loved and hated. Apple is loved and defended by the converted and outcast by the PC crowd. Harley Davidson is loved to the extent that the converted tattoo the logo on their bodies.

Rush Limbaugh is loved by the conservatives and hated by the liberals. Dave Ramsey is loved by the conservative investor and hated by credit card companies and whole life insurance salespeople. Dr. Laura would consistently be critical of her callers. Yet she would receive more callers than she could handle on any given show.

Safety lacks creativity. It is risky to be truly creative. Taking a chance is really the only way to get noticed. Safe blends in. Risky stands out. Great brands are unique.

Take this week and review your brand. Look for consistency, the benefits and the uniqueness. Are you succeeding at all three elements of powerful brand? Where can you improve?

Successful brands do not happen overnight. It takes time. We are creating a relationship. Continue to build your consistency each week. Keep your listener at the forefront of your content. Then, find ways to be unique.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

 

* Please know that book links are affiliate links for Podcast Talent Coach.

Have You Tried These 6 Audio Imagination Tricks? – Episode 104

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Have You Tried These 6 Audio Imagination Tricks? – Episode 104

Imagination

Imagination. It is the wonderful result of recorded audio. When you listen to the radio, podcasts, audiobooks or other recorded audio, the imagination is in full motion. Your imagination belongs to you and you alone. You have full control. Your imagination is unlike any other.

Your imagination is used for your sole benefit. The characters and scenes created in your “Theater of the Mind” are exactly how you want them to look. The images are created in your mind in a way that gives you the greatest pleasure. It is all to benefit you.

The wonderful details in a story can stir the imagination in magical ways.

Last week, we talked about the element of surprise and delight within your podcast. Pieces of audio can add a wonderful element of surprise.

Video typically doesn’t stimulate the imagination the way audio does. When you see a car in a video, you know exactly what it looks like. If you and I both see a car in a video, we would both describe it in very similar ways. There is not much left to interpretation.

If I describe a cherry red 1968 Ford Mustang to you, I couldn’t possibly describe every detail. What does the interior look like? Where is it parked … or was it moving? Is there anybody in it? What kind of tires are on it? Hard top or convertible? There are many details to the story left to your interpretation.

Your imagination creates the car in a way that adds the most to your story and vision. That is the magic of recorded audio. Vivid details take your stories to another level of engagement that video cannot.

WAR OF THE WORLDS

You and I often discuss the incorporation of stories within your podcast. Stories reveal a lot about you as a storyteller. Stories also bring your content to life in the “Theater of the Mind”. Audio simply makes those mental images even stronger.

War of the Worlds” was an incredible radio broadcast in the 1930s that brought mental imagery to life a little too well.

The episode by the great Orson Welles changed the way broadcasters approached their on-air responsibilities to the public for years to come. The show became famous for allegedly causing mass panic, although the reality of this mass panic was disputed.

Regardless, broadcasters changed the way they presented information on the air in order to keep the government off their backs. The audio was that powerful.

“War of the Worlds” was an episode of an American radio drama called “The Mercury Theatre on the Air”. This particular episode aired as a Halloween episode on October 30, 1938 when shows of this nature were performed live.

The story is an adaptation of the H. G. Wells novel “The War of the Worlds”. The story was shortened to fit a one-hour performance. It was presented as a series of fake news bulletins reporting an actual alien invasion.

The audio and effects added to the realism and the ensuing panic.

Later that evening, a few hours after the show aired, Orson Welles was standing in Times Square in New York City. Staring up at the New York Times building, he read the news bulletin, “Orson Welles Causes Panic.”

The media and politicians were in outrage the next day. They called for regulation by the Federal Communications Commission that would limit material allowed to be broadcast. They were upset that the broadcast was TOO REAL and therefore deceptive to the public.

The production was TOO GOOD. How crazy is that?

Over the years, Welles rose to fame as a producer and actor. This particular episode added to his meteoric rise.

Audio has that power to supercharge the imagination.

How are you using audio in your podcast to spark the imagination?

There are different ways to include recorded production elements within your show that will enhance your listener’s imagination and experience. When you add recorded elements, the imagination of your listener will be further stimulated. You will help create elements within your listener’s “Theater of the Mind”.

Here are a few recorded elements you could easily add to your podcast to spice up the listening experience.

1. INTRO/OUTRO

This is showbiz. Your podcast is created to entertain just as much as inform. It is just as much “show” as it is “business”. Add some sizzle to your show.

A produced “intro” and “outro” for your podcast is easy first step. The “intro” opens the show, as in “introduction”. The “outro” closes the show, similar to a conclusion.

At a minimum, find a great piece of music that will open and close your show. You can find many sites on the internet that sell music clips for just a few dollars.

Check out THIS SITE for an example.

2. INTERVIEWS

Guest interviews are a great way to add depth to your audio. A second voice on the show will stir the imagination. Listeners will wonder what your guest looks like. The stories told during the interview will create visions in the mind of your listener.

Listeners enjoy eavesdropping on other conversations more than listening to a lecture. By adding interviews to your show, you allow your listener this pleasure. Sure, you could provide the information yourself rather than going through all the work to secure, arrange and conduct the interview. If you are hoping to develop a relationship with your listener using content that will be engaging, go the extra step by including interviews within your podcast.

3. LISTENERS

Adding listener audio to your show will add additional depth to your podcast. When you simply read a listener e-mail, the question typically lacks the passion that would come from the listener. The inflection is a little different than the caller would use. The question is also asked in the same cadence, style and voice that you ask every other question.

When you add listener audio, a second dimension is added to the show. Though the caller isn’t actually there, the second voice almost creates a conversation. Your audience is now listening to a conversation rather than a monologue. The question will also be asked in a way unique to the caller.

Similar to the way interviews stimulate the listener’s imagination, callers can add to the “Theater of the Mind”.

You don’t need to include the entire phone call. It is show biz. Use the part of the call that will most add to your show. If the call includes a bunch of details not relevant to the question or the show, feel free to edit those parts out of the call. As long as you are not changing the intention of the caller, or making it sound like they are saying something they didn’t say, editing the call is perfectly acceptable.

4. AUDIO EXAMPLES

When you make reference to a piece of audio, play a sample. If you are talking about an interview that Jimmie Johnson gave after a race, play a clip of that interview. Your listeners will be further engaged by the additional voice. Audio examples are just another way to add that additional level of production to your show.

Additional audio will take your listener to another place. An interview clip will transport your listener to the interview location. An old television clip with create memories of seeing the show. A sample of a classic speech may elicit visions of the orator. Use audio to enhance the listening experience.

5. CELEBRITY ENDORSEMENTS

People like to have their decisions validated. That is why many companies hire celebrities to endorse their products. If Michael Jordan wears Hanes, it should be alright for me to wear Hanes as well. I don’t feel like I’m the only one doing it when I see Michael Jordan doing it.

You can use this concept to benefit your podcast. If you can get a well-known name in your area of expertise to record a quick endorsement for your show, that piece of audio will add an element of credibility to your podcast. Your listeners will feel like they are not alone in liking your show. They will be validated.

6. SOUND EFFECTS

Sound effects can easily enhance the imagination. You need to be careful that you don’t overuse sound effects. Too many effects can make your show sound amateur. However, a well-placed effect here and there can add to the delight of listening.

Adam Carolla has a producer who is responsible for adding sound effects to the show. If you haven’t spent time with Adam’s podcast, listen to one episode simply for the production elements. His content may not be your cup of tea. However, the production of the show must be admired.

The magic of recorded audio comes from the imagination. When you stir wonderful visions in the “Theater of the Mind” of your listener, you will truly begin to engage your audience. You can then begin to build meaningful relationships with your listeners and keep them coming back again and again. Use these ideas to add a little “show biz” to your podcast today.
If you have never subscribed to the Podcast Talent Coach podcast, please spend two minutes to do so. I would truly appreciate your generosity. Click the LINK and then the subscribe button in iTunes.

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Purple Cow Your Podcast Brand – Episode 103

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Purple Cow Your Podcast Brand – Episode 103

The unexpected is amusing, delightful and memorable. Being direct assumes your listener cares about your marketing message. She doesn’t. Your listener cares about his or her needs, wants and desires. Attract their attention by doing the unexpected.

In his book “The Purple Cow”, Seth Godin says, “Cows, after you’ve seen one or two or ten, are boring. A purple cow, though … ow that would be something.” Phenomenal, counterintuitive, exciting and unbelievable.

If you want to get noticed, you need to stand out. You cannot afford to be a different shade of gray.

BJ Bueno in his book “The Power Of Cult Branding” describes the same. Oprah, Star Trek, Harley Davidson, Apple, Vans shoes. They are cult brands because they are incredibly different. They are not simply a percentage better or brighter or less filling. They are different.

Just a side note, if you would like to support the show, please use my affiliate links to both of these books.

Physical versions:

You can get a free audio book with a free trial to Audible using my affiliate link.  CLICK HERE.

If you are considering either book, I’d love to have you use my link.

To engage your podcast listener and create a relationship, you need to be memorable. In order to be memorable, you must be unique. Be distinct, unusual, and unexpected. If you sound like every other show, you will not stand out and get noticed.

DISTINCT

Be unique. If everyone else is interviewing the popular clique in your niche, make your show different. Stand out. Interview different people. Interview the same people in different ways. Create a different interview style. Instead of interviewing, turn it into an expose or magazine style feature.

Jimmy Fallon is great at “not” interviewing people. He will do a lip sync challenge. Sometimes he will do a skit. He might turn it into a game show. It isn’t the typical interview.

UNUSUAL

Is everyone doing it the same way? Do it differently. You could add listener calls to the show. Don’t wait for them to call you. Reach out to people who e-mail you and ask if you can call and record them.

When I did episode 100 and 101, I didn’t hope people would call a voicemail number. I reached out and set up a call just like I would with an interview. Be proactive.

Apple is unusual. Wikipedia is unusual. Volkswagen is unusual. Stand out. Don’t be a different shade of gray.

There is a car dealer in Omaha that does things differently. Instead of being a little better or different, they have flipped the car buying experience on its head.

The dealership has a customer parking lot clearly marked. You are not attacked by 15 car salesmen the minute you drive on the lot. They hold the door for you. They help you find the person you need.

The dealer also understands that you have a lot of info from the web, so they don’t take an entire day to get the deal done. They have eliminated the games.

They just want to sell more cars. They don’t necessarily need to get every penny out of a deal. They more time they save, the more time they have to sell another car.

By doing things differently, this dealership has become the #1 Nissan dealer in the region. On top of that, they’ve only been open a few years.

UNEXPECTED

Another dealer took it over the top with my service.

My battery wouldn’t hold a charge. I figured it was my alternator. So, I took it to the dealership.

If you have ever had a battery replaced, you know how painful it can be to reset your radio, clock and other electronic features in your car.

When I picked up my car, they had reset my radio, clock and everything else. The first thing the mechanic did when he got into my car was write down my radio stations. Not only was it reprogrammed, it was back on the original station.

This dealership does the unexpected. They are also the #1 Ford F-150 pickup dealer in the country.

Dave Jackson does the unexpected when he interrupts his interviews with interesting asides. He drives the point home by interrupting himself. Who would think of doing that? It goes against every interviewing standard. Well, it adds unexpected surprised to his interviews.

Drop in some audio to surprise your listener. Take the show in a direction that your listener wouldn’t expect. If they think you are going right, go left.

If you can create unique, memorable experiences for your listener by incorporating the unexpected, you begin to create powerful, meaningful relationships.

Are you using cows?

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

How To Define Your Avatar Or Target Listener – Episode 102

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How To Define Your Avatar Or Target Listener – Episode 102

AVATAR

As we develop our business around our podcast, we strive to build trust. In order to build trust, we must develop relationships with our listeners. Friendships are created when you truly know everything about a person. This is the reason it is crucial that you define your single target listener.

Many podcasters refer to their target listener as their avatar. This person is the single individual around which you create all of your content.

To develop your business, you need to define your niche. Your focus on your niche helps grow your community. The ideal customers within that niche gives the focus the power.

TRUST

We have heard it said many times before. People do business with those they know, like and trust. This trust is what our friendship with our ideal listener is developing.

To build trust with our podcast, we need to have a conversation with one person. In order to do that, we need to define that ideal listener. Our target listener.

I have created a Listener Development Worksheet. This template will walk you through the development of your target listener step-by-step.

Use this worksheet to create your ideal listener. The more you know about your listener, the better you will be able to communicate. Keep this person in mind while recording each show.

YOUR AVATAR

In this episode, we walk through the worksheet. By the end of the show, you should have your ideal listener well defined along with a visual image in your mind.

Download the Listener Development Worksheet along with six others at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

A few characteristics of your ideal listener we will define today include age, gender, income, interests and fears. These are only a few of the 17 characteristics we will examine.

Be sure you have downloaded the worksheet. It will be a tremendous help with this episode.

Your ideal listener will evolve over time. The more you learn about your target listener, the more you will fine tune your definition.

RESEARCH

You can learn more about your audience by using a survey like Survey Monkey. Be careful that you ask questions that your audience will be comfortable answering. Specific income might be too personal. A range might be better.

Let me know how it turns out. I would love to help you any way I can.

You can find these worksheets in the free Worksheet series online at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Steps To Develop Your Show Strategy – Episode 099

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Steps To Develop Your Show Strategy – Episode 099

Strategy

Developing your strategy involves determining how you will uniquely address each topic. Whether you are presenting information, answering questions or interviewing guests, there are many ways to address each topic. You do not need to do it the same way every other podcast does it. Be unique. Find the way that will stand out.

If you are interviewing, do you need to ask the same questions that every other podcast asks? What if you play a game with each guest called “The Hat of Forbidden Questions”. It’s a hat filled with crazy questions. You simply reach in the hat, pull out a question and ask whatever is on the card. The method is completely different than every other podcast. This approach will also generate unique answers while engaging your guest in a unique manner.

Here is a tip many people forget. This is show business. You could play “The Hat of Forbidden Questions” and never even have a hat. You could have a list of crazy questions for your guest written out and simply pretend to reach into a hat. This is show business. You are here to entertain.

Do you think the actors in “Seinfeld” or “The Sopranos” ad lib their lines? Of course not. Do you find it less entertaining when they follow the script? Of course not. There is no reason you cannot add a little show biz to your show.

Just be sure to always be true to the show. If you are going to pretend there is a hat, you MUST ALWAYS pretend there is a hat. Giving up the showbiz secret will ruin everything. On the other hand, you could really have a hat and have a ton of fun with it.

Determine how you will approach each topic. Will you play audio examples? Will you play voice messages from your listeners? Are you going to read e-mail? Maybe there is a guest contributor. Determine each approach before the show begins.

Once you have your list of topics, develop a strategy to uniquely approach each of those topics. Be original. Stand out from the crowd. Know how you will handle each topic before your show begins.

Questions

Here are a few questions to help you begin.

What are you passionate about?
What are your unique qualities?
What topic tends to occupy most of your conversations?
What do you like to do in your spare time?
Use these topics to define a focus for the show.

Complete this sentence: I help ___ do ____ so they can ____.

Many online marketers use this sentence to define their purpose and focus. You can do the same.

You can find these questions on the Show Focus Development Worksheet in the free Worksheet series online at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

4 Essential Elements of Powerful Storytelling – Episode 090

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Four Essential Elements of Powerful Storytelling – Episode 090

Powerful Storytelling

Why should you use storytelling in your podcast?

Have you noticed a lot of the business interview podcasts sound the same? We are hearing the same guests answer the same questions time and time again. How do you become unique in this sea of sameness?

Use stories.

Storytelling can transform your podcast.

The power of storytelling can help listeners get to know, like and trust you. Through that knowledge, true friendships are formed. Stories help define you and your character and personality. Great storytellers create fans.

Don’t fit in, stand out.

In this episode, we discussed great storytellers in various genres, such as country singer/songwriter Lee Brice, pop singer/songwriter Jason Mraz, Walt Disney and Zig Ziglar. All are great storytellers in their own right.

In podcasting, you cannot afford to be boring. Interest in your story never remains constant. Your information can only become entertainment when interest is rising. A great story continues to develop the plot and raise the interest.

There are four elements to great storytelling.

Give your listener a reason to care, reveal the details, create a great resolution, and then ask what else?

Give Her A Reason To Care

Begin by creating an engaging introduction. What do you want the audience to feel? Begin your story there.

Your engaging introduction is the roadmap for your listener. This will tell your listener where the story is going.

Reveal The Details

Details are more believable than generalities. Be sure to use all 5 senses in your details. Put your listener in the moment by creating wonderful images in the theater of the mind.

Details help reveal specifics about your thoughts, beliefs and character. Listeners begin to know, like and trust you.

Powerful Resolution

Your powerful resolution is a reframing of your introduction. This is where you put the nice bow on the package.

What Else?

Asking “what else” will transform your show. This helps continue the conversation. “What else” will let your content live on long after the episode is over.

Let your story lead to something bigger. This is all part of your strong call to action. Get your community involved.

How Can You Be A Storyteller?

Ask yourself these questions:
What is the engaging set up?
How will your point be revealed in the story?
What is the power resolution?
What else can you do with the material?

Resources

Here are a few other episodes that can help you refine your storytelling:

Powerful Podcast Stories – Episode 043

Stories Transform Your Podcast – Episode 047

The Real Reason People Listen To Your Podcast – Episode 083

Who Else Wants A Unique Brand? – Episode 076

 

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

A Memorable Podcast Brand – Episode 088

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A Memorable Podcast Brand – Episode 088

Lionel Ritchie is a class act and every bit of a gentleman you would hope he would be.
Lionel Ritchie is a class act and every bit of a gentleman you would hope he would be.

Do they remember?

When you consider the options podcast listeners have, the importance of creating a powerful brand really becomes apparent.

I searched iTunes for podcasts about hockey. There are hundreds of hockey podcasts available. Thousands and thousands of episodes exist that deal with hockey. You can find various topics, including drills, NHL teams, coaching, fantasy hockey and many more.

How do you stand out? How do you get noticed?

Your listener needs to remember your podcast, so they can return and listen again. That is the way to build a following. It really doesn’t matter how many people listen today. What builds a strong podcast is the number of listeners that come back the next time, and the next time, and the time after that. You build your audience slowly with more listeners this week than you had last week. Get your listener to remember to return.

Using your brand to create strong relationships with your listeners is critical to the health of your podcast. If you are bland, you will get lost in the sea of average. There are over 100,000 podcasts available for consumption. Most of them are average or worse. If you refine your content, turn your information into entertainment, and transform your podcast into powerful relationships, you will easily stand out from the crowd. It is a must not only for your success, but your mere survival. Begin your brand today.

When it comes time for your audience listening again, do they remember?

Be Yourself

A great podcast is a great relationship. It is just like creating a great brand. In order to develop that solid relationship, you must be yourself. You can’t fake it.

When you try to be someone or something you are not, you will not sound authentic. Eventually, the truth will come out.

Have you ever met someone you had admired from afar, only to have them do something that didn’t fit with your image of them? Maybe it was a baseball player, or a movie star, or a politician or a musician. You met them with great expectations of an encounter with your hero only to find out they were rude and average. It turned out they were only being who they thought they should be for the public when really they were someone completely different in real life.

Everyone has their flaws. That is what makes them human. Howard Stern has flaws. He makes his flaws part of his show. Domino’s Pizza admitted the errors of their ways with their cheap, low quality pizza. They laid it out for the world to see in their marketing. Your listener will accept your flaws. They will feel like you are “one of them” when you admit your flaws upfront. Don’t be afraid to expose yourself.

When your listener discovers you are something other than the character you portray, the bond of trust will be demolished. Your relationship will be forever damaged.

Build a solid brand. Be yourself.

Unique, Vivid, Mental Images

When someone tells a story, on the radio or in a podcast, it is theater of the mind. When you hear the old time radio show describe the dim light on in the servant’s quarters, the scenery is playing out in your mind in a unique way unlike the way anyone else could envision it. No other person is imagining the clothing of the characters the exact same way you are imagining them. That mental theater is unique to you. You are listening and imagining by yourself.

Podcasts make the one-on-one approach even more important. Podcasts are often enjoyed through headphones. Your audience is truly listening by themselves. The headphones block out all other sounds and distractions. You have multiple “one person” audiences at the same time. Yet, it is still one person.

Connect with your “one person” audience by creating a great theater. The theater will be different for each listener, because they are using their individual imagination. Create a movie and put the listener in it. Make the story an individual experience for the listener. Engage the listener with vivid details and a fantastic storyline. Make them forget they are listening to a podcast. Create great theater of the mind. Create unique, vivid, mental images.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Top 12 Takeaways From NMX – Episode 087

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Top 12 Takeaways From NMX – Episode 087

Photo bombed by Mark Harmon. Rob Greenlee, Rob Walch, Erik K. Johnson, Seth Resler and Dave Jackson.
Photo bombed by Mark Harmon. Rob Greenlee, Rob Walch, Erik K. Johnson, Seth Resler and Dave Jackson.

Before we jump in this week, can I ask a quick favor? If you have never subscribed to the Podcast Talent Coach Podcast, can you please take two minutes to do so and leave a review? It will help us get exposed to new podcasters and grow our community. Thanks a million. CLICK HERE.

New Media Expo 2015 wrapped up in Las Vegas last week. What an amazing event.

As Director of the Podcasting Track at NMX, Dave Jackson from the School of Podcasting put together an amazing line up of talent.

Though the sessions were packed full of great information, the relationships created at these events make it more than just a learning opportunity. I had the chance to connect with great people I have known for a bit. Here are just a few:

Dave JacksonSchool of Podcasting
Rem LavictoireSci-Fi Movie Podcast
Daniel J. LewisThe Audacity To Podcast
Bill Conrad – New Media Gold

I also had the chance to meet a few new people and connect with those I have only known over e-mail. Here are a few of those great people:

Rob WalchLibsyn
Rob GreenleeSpreaker
Nick SeuberlingInside The Jungle
Corey FineranIvy Envy
Pat FlynnSmart Passive Income
Seth ReslerSethResler.com

There were many others that I met and created valuable conversations. New Media Expo is such an incredible event for our podcasting community.

After I attend a conference like this, usually on the flight home, I like to review my notes to find the big points I can put to use as soon as I arrive home. This week, I would like to share with you my top 12 takeaways from NMX.

This list isn’t nearly exhaustive of the things I learned. Some are not even new, but great reminders. We dig into each one in this episode.

1. Schedule it, so it gets done.

2. If advertising is driving people away from traditional media, why are so many podcasters so anxious to add commercials to their show?

3. From Mignon Fogarty: E-mail newsletter is the #1 way to reach your audience. Make sure it has a personal tone.

4. From Chris Ducker: There seems to be a lack of originality in the online business space. Stop being lazy and come up with your own (stuff).

5. From Rob Walch: iOS usage crushes android devices 6:1 in download ratio. (In this episode, we also discuss a few tips for iTunes search he provided.)

6. From Lou Mongello: Don’t forget the importance of face-to-face contact and communication.

7. From Mark Ramsey: Beginnings matter. Radio listeners always come in somewhere in the middle. Podcast listeners always come in at the beginning.

8. From Pat Flynn: I’d rather live a life full of oh wells, than a life full of what ifs.

9. From Dave Jackson: When you wonder why anyone would ever listen to you, remember that you are special (neat). Then, embrace your uniqueness, and understand the bar isn’t set very high.

10. From Daniel J. Lewis: The description in iTunes does not help SEO, but does help the PERSON. Make your episode titles appealing, as if they are your portfolio.

11. From David Hooper: People aren’t paying you to podcast. They are paying you to help solve their problems.

12. From Cliff Ravenscraft: When growing your audience/community, connect to your existing audience and make the experience great for them. Get word of mouth to spread.

Thanks for spending another week with me. I truly appreciate your time.

I also want to thank Joshua and Mercy for the amazing feedback regarding the last episode about your “why”. Many of you sent feedback, which I greatly appreciate. I had wonderful exchanges with Joshua and Mercy that helped me create a great plan. Thanks for all you do for me.

If you have never subscribed to the Podcast Talent Coach podcast, please spend two minutes to do so. I would truly appreciate your generosity.

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Real Reason People Listen To Your Podcast – Episode 083

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The Real Reason People Listen To Your Podcast – Episode 083

Dreams

Why do people listen to your podcast? Why would anyone spend the time to listen to your show?

Have you ever paused to give that question some consideration?

Why do people spend time with audio at any given point in time?

THE REASONS

There are two primary reasons people listen to audio. Companionship and dreams.

It is human nature to desire companionship. People do not want to be alone. Whether they are driving, jogging, biking, mowing or doing something else by themselves, they want to do it with someone else.

Audio serves the role of companion.

DREAMS

The other reason people spend time with podcasts is to dream. People want to live vicariously through your dreams, stories, challenges and successes. They want to enjoy your success without needing to suffer the pain of your failures.

Tell stories to help fulfill the desire of your listener to dream.

People dream about having a different (and usually better) life. They want to experience those things others are experiencing. The grass always seems greener on the other side of the fence. People crave living the lives of others.

Your listeners want to live vicariously through you. They want to experience your success. They wish they had the courage to do the things you have done. Your fans want to be you in some way or another.

Voyeurism is a reason many people watch the shows they watch, listen to the stories they hear, or read the books they read. They want to experience the lives of others.

MY STORY

Architecture was my original career path. It wasn’t until three years into my architecture degree that I realized radio was the profession I was designed to pursue. I was able to work in a profession I absolutely love. Now, after 25 years in radio, I have taken the talent coaching facet of radio and turned it into a path helping podcasters create amazing content.

That path has now led me to be a speaker at some of the best podcasting conferences in the country. I was a speaker at Podcast Movement 2014. This year, I will give a presentation at New Media Expo in Las Vegas in April. My life is full of amazing events, because I dared to dream and follow my passion.

DREAMS

Your listeners want to dream. Help them.

People eavesdrop on the conversations of others for the very same reasons. They can experience the life of others without the risk of failure. Eavesdropping doesn’t take the courage that it takes to actually live the life.

By telling great stories about your experiences, you help your audience fulfill the desire to live vicariously through you. If your show contains audio of your feats and experiences, you allow your audience to become the voyeurs they desire. When you interview people on your show, you allow your listener to eavesdrop on your conversation.

When you simply lecture as the content of your show, you fail to help your listener experience any of those three desires.

KNOW, LIKE & TRUST

Find new ways to deliver your material to your audience. You will make those important connections that turn into friendships. Those relationships will foster loyalty to your show. Your tribe will follow you wherever you go. That’s a powerful thing.

Tell stories of self-revelation. See where it takes you. You’ll be surprised how many people wish they could be you.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

5 Ways To Use Social Media To Drive Engagement – Episode 082

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5 Ways To Use Social Media To Drive Engagement – Episode 082

Bluebird Cafe

Using social media to drive our businesses is nothing new. However, there are a million different philosophies about how to properly use the platforms.

At the Country Radio Seminar in Nashville recently, social media was the topic of quite a few panels, presentations and discussions. I gathered some facts and quite a few tips and tricks for you to use.

There is quite the difference between Facebook and Twitter. Many see the two platforms as similar and equally important. That couldn’t be further from the truth.

83% of people use Facebook everyday. 17% use Pinterest. 12% use Instagram and only 8% use Twitter on a daily basis.

Facebook is personal. The platform is used to connect with family and friends to share life. This is often the first thing people do when they wake up in the morning.

Twitter is interesting, real time communication. The platform allows you to interact with others. Twitter is a discussion when used effectively.

Facebook and Twitter should be used differently. Content lives and is relevant longer on Facebook. Twitter is the here and now.

Here are five ways to use social media more effectively to drive your podcast engagement.

ACKNOWLEDGE

To create community and engagement using social media, make those that follow you feel interesting. Retweet their content. Acknowledge them. Get involved in the discussion.

STOP YELLING

Use social media like you are a fan instead of a marketer yelling at people. Get excited about the things that get your fans excited.

Use the 90/10 rule. 90% of your content should be entertaining and helpful. Only 10% of your posts should be selling anything.

BE PURPOSEFUL

Keep three goals in mind when you are using social media to engage your tribe. Seek to either inform, entertain or appreciate. “Hey, buy my book” is none of the above. You can promote your book while accomplishing one of the three goals. You simply need to be creative.

Most people unfollow someone because of uninteresting content.

STIR EMOTION

Stirring emotion within your tribe will get them excited. Play to their heart instead of their head.

Use positive feelings most of the time. Stir a mix of motions, but always bring it back to a positive, happy ending or hope. Finally, surprise your tribe.

YOU ARE ON CAMERA

Video is really driving engagement on social media. Figure out how to incorporate a little of that into your strategy. Inform, entertain or acknowledge using video once in awhile.

Make personal connections and interactions to drive your engagement. Social media is a great way to accomplish those connections.
The Country Radio Seminar taught me so much. It is also an amazing way to meet new people and make connections. You can do the same. Join me at New Media Expo April 13-16 in Las Vegas. I would love to see you when I present my session on powerful storytelling.

Learn how to use stories to create that engagement and powerful call to action. Meet a ton of new people to help you move your business forward. Use my affiliate link and promo code to save $100 on your registration here.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create Results Without A Big Mailing List – Episode 081

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Create Results Without A Big Mailing List – Episode 081

Erik K. Johnson & Tim McGraw

This week I am at the Country Radio Seminar in Nashville, Tennessee. It has been an amazing week so far. I am learning so much about audience engagement and am looking forward to sharing it with you in the coming weeks. That photo is me with the amazing Tim McGraw.

A few years ago, I saw an amazing presentation that debunked the 80/20 principle.

The 80/20 principle proposes that 80% of your results is created by 20% of your efforts. This could be 80% of sales from 20% of customers. It could also be 80% of success attributed to 20% of efforts.

This particular session focused on a study done in 2008 by Catalina Marketing that found that 80% of your results are driven by 2.5% of your efforts. Specifically, it found that 80% of sales at large companies like Coca Cola are driven by 2.5% of their customers. You can find the entire study here.

The study really proved that consumers no longer strive to be part of the crowd, but rather seek products that reflect their personal preferences, needs and lifestyle choices. Examples of companies that have built successful business models that appeal to the “me” consumer include Starbucks®, Apple®, Facebook® and Dell™.

This theory is perfect for podcasting. We can truly niche down and focus on the 2.5%. We can move the needle with a group of super fans much smaller than we once thought.

What are you doing to reach the 2.5%? How can you create results without that big mailing list?

Your podcast is a great vehicle to do just that. Let’s find the content to move your 2.5%.

EMOTIONAL CONNECTION

Develop your brand by developing an emotional connection. Stories will help you create that connection by revealing things about yourself. Hype will not sustain a brand. You need to be true to who you are.

A brand is a promise. You must deliver on that promise every time.

A brand is a collection of perceptions. You must deliver those perceptions consistently.

Speak the language of your audience when you deliver on your promise and your perceptions.

USE YOUR ASSETS

Use your podcast and other digital assets to drive your 2.5% to your website with a powerful call to action. Make sure you convert the visits with a very specific call to action every time.

In order to create a powerful call to action, create your plan. What is the goal of your show? Use your goal to create content that helps your audience. Create fans with your great content. Then, move them with your call to action.

You do not need a huge audience or a big mailing list. You only need a very passionate few percent. What are you doing to motivate your 2.5%?
The Country Radio Seminar is teaching me so much. It is also an amazing way to meet new people. You can do the same. Join me at New Media Expo April 13-16 in Las Vegas. I would love to see you when I present my session on powerful storytelling.

Learn how to use stories to create that engagement and powerful call to action. Meet a ton of new people to help you move your business forward. Use my affiliate link and promo code to save $100 on your registration here.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

How To Turn Overwhelm Into Focused Power – Episode 079

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How To Turn Overwhelm Into Focused Power – Episode 079

(photo by Albo)
(photo by Albo)

This week, I received an e-mail from Cynthia Davis from CynthiaDavis.net and her podcast “Home Front”. She is finding herself overwhelmed by everything she hopes to accomplish with her podcast. In this episode, I offer a few suggestions to defeat that overwhelming feeling and find focus in her work.

Here is the e-mail …

I am still struggling on the bottom rung of the ladder and have no idea how to implement everything you suggest without having staff to help with this effort.

It’s my own fault because I could spend more time on this than I do, but I am at my maximum capacity with all the other responsibilities I have to juggle.

I have been doing the podcast for over two years, but it’s not growing. In fact, the e-mail list I have used to make people aware of a new podcast coming out has been shrinking. I wish my show would grow organically and that my super-fans would promote it, but that’s simply not happening.

The only conclusion I can come to is that the world doesn’t like my message. I am overwhelmed. I am about to record my 100th episode and I believe the content is as good as I can make it, but if no one wants our message, what can we do?

-Cynthia

 

Overwhelm is natural. I think we all face it at some point in time. We all want to accomplish so much, yet we have limited time in the week. Let’s find those tasks that will really move the needle and make a difference for us.

Here are Cynthia’s primary questions with six steps to turn the overwhelm into focused power.

SO MUCH TO DO

“no idea how to implement everything you suggest”
-Don’t feel like you need to do it all. Focus on one or two things that will move the needle.

FINDING TIME

“I could spend more time on this than I do”
-Spend your time wisely. Instead of two hours on one day, make it 30 minutes each night before you go to bed.

NOT GROWING

“I have been doing the podcast for over two years, but it’s not growing”
-Find two or three ways to grow your podcast that utilize tasks you already do or enjoy. If you’re on social media, make that part of your growth plan.

SHRINKING LIST

“the e-mail list I have used to make people aware of a new podcast coming out has been shrinking”
-Be consistent in your e-mail. Send it on a regular basis. Make content that is anticipated. Add content that helps people solve their problems. Be giving.

NO ORGANIC GROWTH

“I wish my show would grow organically and that my super-fans would promote it”
-Give fans a reason to share it. Make your content sharable. Lists, tips, recipes, photos, jokes, and recommendations are all sharable.

NOBODY LIKES ME

“The only conclusion I can come to is that the world doesn’t like my message”
-Find the people that want your message. Do outreach. Find the communities where your kin congregate. Get involved.
Follow these six steps and you are sure to find more focus in your work. These tips will help you decrease the overwhelming feeling in your life. You can find the area that move the needle and truly work smarter rather than harder.
I’m speaking at New Media Expo 2015 in Las Vegas. You can save $100 on your registration. Use the coupon code Ejohnson20. Find all of the details by clicking HERE.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Who Else Wants A Unique Brand? – Episode 076

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Who Else Wants A Unique Brand? – PTC Episode 076

My daughter took a group of us to the Katy Perry show. Now that's a unique brand.
My daughter took a group of us to the Katy Perry show. Now that’s a unique brand.

A memorable brand that becomes a household name. It is like the Holy Grail. So many companies strive for it, but so few achieve it. Why is that?

A brand is a type of product manufactured by a particular company under a particular name, a brand name, a particular identity or image regarded as an asset, or a particular type or kind of something.

But, when we think of a brand, we think of so much more. There is so much more emotion in a powerful brand.

Under those definitions, Honda is a brand. However, it is a much different brand than Harley Davidson. Star Trek is a brand, although a much different brand than Battlestar Galactica. Oprah is a brand. I don’t think anyone would equal Oprah’s brand to that of Sally Jessy Raphael.

Each of those iconic brands were available at the same time their counterpart was making a name for themselves. Yet, the iconic brands became huge, powerful, valuable names. That’s not to say the other brands were not familiar or valuable. Those competitor brands simply did not become the astronomical brands of the segment leaders.

Why is that? What can you learn from these iconic brands that can help your podcast become a name, identity or image, but a name that evokes powerful emotion from your listener. How can you create fans instead of a casual audience?

Here are six steps you can put into use this week to begin to develop your unique brand.

 

Develop Your Style

Create everything you do in your own style. Powerful brands have a style all their own.

Your style is your way of doing something. Are you friendly? How about challenging or argumemtative? Maybe you are the Everyman. Is your podcast a narrative or instructional? Are you explosive, soothing or euphoric? Do I hear sarcasm in your show? Are you a friend to everybody or the guy they love to hate? Do you take risks or play it close to the vest?

Each piece plays into your style.

You can only stand out among all other shows when you create your own unique style. You must then make sure everything you do is consistent with that style.

Many new broadcasters try to emulate the style of their hero or mentor. They attempt to imitate the styles they hear from other broadcasters. Unfortunately, copying doesn’t create a unique style. Copying typically creates a watered-down version of some other style. When creating your content, be yourself and find your own style.

Some of the greatest broadcasters didn’t start the ascension to the top until they abandoned the attempts to broadcast in the style they thought others desired and began being true to themselves.

Oprah Winfrey quit trying to be a traditional news anchor. She also quit doing the typical tabloid, daytime talk show like Sally Jessy Raphael was doing at the time. When she began to create the show she always desired, she went to the top of the game.

Howard Stern began as a radio DJ sounding like every other radio DJ. He was playing the records and spouting the lines written by management while going nowhere. If you watch “Private Parts”, Stern’s autobiographical movie, one of the classic scenes is Howard trying to recite “W-N-B-C” just like his boss wants everyone to do it.

When Stern decided he was going to do radio his way, he began to make a name for himself. He also went to the top.

Rush Limbaugh followed a very similar path. His bland radio name was Jeff Christie. He followed the format designed by somebody else. Limbaugh made every attempt to fulfill the typical radio DJ stereotype.

He also got fired again and again. When he decided to broadcast in his style and true to his beliefs, he began his rise to the top.

Adam Corolla made his climb when he took full control over his style and show. He was climbing the DJ ladder in Los Angeles. Corolla had some decent television work. He then decided to create his own show in his own style via podcast. That began his rise as one of the biggest podcasters in the world.

All of these broadcasters made the decision to stop copying others. They all created shows that were true to their style.

They each also stay true to their style in everything they do. You will never hear Rush sound like Howard. You’ll never mistake something Oprah says as something Adam might say. Being true to their style isn’t something that takes conscious effort. It comes easy to each of them, because it is true to who they are as people.

Be true to yourself. It will make it easy to create everything you do in your style.

Define Your Character With Stories

I’m not simply talking about your integrity. By character, I mean all of the attributes that create you, as in character in a play.

The purpose of your show is to attract an audience. Whether you want to monetize that relationship, encourage a call-to-action, or simply create an audience for your ideas, creating the audience is where you begin.

The stories you choose to tell reveal how open you are to others. Your openness is a sign of trust. Trust is a big piece of a relationship. Reveal things about yourself through your stories and you’ll begin to build trust with your listener.

The details you include tell your listener what you value. If the listener feels you value things they too value, you solidify the relationship. People like to hang out with similar people. If your values are opposite of your listener, you may also attract them. It is like a love/hate relationship. They may dislike it, but they continue to listen. This often happens when talking politics.

What you find entertaining will be evident by the stories you tell. Since people like other people who have similar tastes, revealing those things you find entertaining will also build the relationship.

Stories also have the power to demonstrate your vulnerability. Stories can show that you are a real person. Your listener will see you as approachable. They also may begin to see you as a friend. That is when true relationships begin to form.

Iconic brands use their story.

Oprah uses her story of her upbringing and career building by breaking down barriers. Her weight loss. Her struggles to cut a new path in daytime talk.

Howard’s story of defying “The Man” and doing it his way inspires others. Rush was told he would never make it on the air and should consider radio sales.

Harley Davidson was a joke in the motorcycle industry. Harley owners had two bikes … one to ride and one for parts. Harley now stands for independence and “take no flack” attitude.

Foster a relationship with your listener by revealing things about yourself through stories. Stories will define your character.

Don’t Just Fill Time

You never catch Oprah just going through the motions. She would never have typical guests on her show. When others were interviewing the co-star of some moving, Oprah would interview the President of the United States. Oprah has Tom Cruise jumping on her couch. You never knew what was going to happen on Oprah’s show.

When you fill time, you waste time. Your listeners have come to your podcast, because you have made them a promise with your brand. They believe they will receive some sort of information and entertainment from your show. Your listener will only give you a few minutes to begin delivering, or they will be headed to the next podcast.

Consistently add value for your listener at every opportunity. Either make the show shorter, or prepare better. It is usually a solid rule of thumb to prepare more content than you will need. This will allow you to always deliver valuable information.

Seth Godin does a fantastic job delivering brief bits of valuable information with his blog. He even carries this through to the manifestos published by his Domino Project. Seth wastes very little time. Once he has made his point, he wraps it up.

Your listener is expecting something from your podcast. Deliver continuously on the promise of your brand. Don’t just fill time.

Be Memorable

When other shows would give away a television, Oprah would give a television to everyone in the audience. Now, everyone does it.

If you want to keep your listener coming back show after show, you need to make them remember to come back. You need to remain top-of-mind for your listener. That is the purpose of audience engagement. Make your listener remember you for something specific about your show.

As you build your show, make it about one thing. Find one particular thing that will be remembered. If you try to be all things to all people, you will water down the show. Everything will be nice. However, isn’t usually truly memorable. You will get lost in the millions of messages your listener receives on a daily basis.

Find the magic. Your listener should remember one thing about your show this week. What will that be?

Stir emotion. Make it amazing. Bring your listener back. Be memorable.

Move Beyond Information

Make your show emotional. That deep connection creates relationships.

The goal of our podcasts is to create strong relationships with our audiences. We can take those relationships and move our listeners with a call to action. To achieve that strong relationship, we need to move beyond information to engaging entertainment.

Dan Miller, author of “48 Days To The Work You Love” could simply explain how you might find a new job. Instead, Dan instills the belief in his listeners that there is more to work than a paycheck. He stirs emotion describing how you can turn your passion into your career. Dan uses that emotion to turn his job finding information into engaging entertainment.

Financial information is turned into entertainment on “The Dave Ramsey Show” when Dave turns debt into the enemy. He doesn’t simply walk you through the steps to become debt free. Dave helps you find that burning desire to escape the shackles of debt. He makes you envision the possibility of “living like no one else”. His help becomes engaging entertainment. That is the reason his show is extremely popular and he is very wealthy.

Our shows can be powerful when we build relationships and move our listeners with a call to action. Those relationships happen when we move beyond information to engaging entertainment.

Risky Stands Out

It was a risk for Rush Limbaugh to step out and be incredibly opinionated regarding politics. Now, there are hundreds of shows that do the same thing.

It was a risk for Harley Davidson to embrace the bad ass lifestyle. Today you can see middle aged guys riding their bike to the office.

It was a risk for Oprah to walk away from the standard daytime tabloid drama that made her successful. You cannot flip through the stations today without finding a dozen copycats of Oprah’s style. However, none of them achieved the success of Oprah.

As we develop meaningful relationships with your podcast, we in turn build credibility that will support our call-to-action within your show. To develop strong relationships, you need to create engaging entertainment that will get you remembered by your listener. To be remembered, you must stand out.

You stand out when you are loved. You are remembered when you are hated. You fade into the background when you are plain, vanilla and trying to not upset anyone. If you don’t stir strong emotions, you are easily forgotten.

When we create, we expose our perspective. We open ourselves to criticism. It is natural to want your thoughts, views, art and creation to be accepted by everyone. To avoid being disappointed, we often play it safe.

Those fantastic, memorable personalities are usually both loved and hated. Rush Limbaugh is loved by the conservatives and hated by the liberals. Dave Ramsey is loved by the conservative investor and hated by credit card companies and whole life insurance salespeople. Dr. Laura would consistently be critical of her callers. Yet she would receive more callers than she could handle on any given show.

Safety lacks creativity. It is risky to be truly creative. However, that is really the only way to get noticed. Safe blends in. Risky stands out.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Important Trust Ingredient – Episode 072

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THE IMPORTANT TRUST INGREDIENT – Episode 072

trust ingredient

You and I have often discussed the ingredients necessary to create powerful business relationships. People do business with those they know, like and trust.

How do we create that important trust ingredient?

In order to develop trust, we need to build consistent structure with our podcasts.

Structure is necessary to build consistency and trust with your fans. The audience expects specific elements each time they listen to your show. They expect your style to be consistent. Your audience expects the host to be the same for each show. You must deliver to that expectation to build trust with your fans. This trust is where podcast monetization begins.

TRUST DESTROYED

In a matter of one meal, lack of consistency destroyed my trust in one of my favorite restaurants.

My family and I went out to a steakhouse for a family meal. This was a restaurant that we visited frequently. In middle America, steak is a frequent meal.

At this particular restaurant, my favorite steak is their filet. It is thick and juicy. Usually medium-well done. Just a little pink in the middle. Oh, so good.

If I don’t order it medium-well, it is usually too red in the middle. I can’t handle steak that does not look like it has been cooked all the way. A little pink and I’m good.

A nice baked potato usually accompanies the steak. I’m in Heaven. Perfect meal.

On this particular night, I ordered it the way I typically order it. Nice and consistent.

That is not the way I received it.

Instead, the waitress delivers me a something that resembles a flat iron steak. Not even an inch thick. It looked more like a strip than a filet.

If you are not a steak eater, this would look more like a flat chicken breast. A filet is more akin to a square tennis ball. The two are nothing similar.

In fact, I don’t even think this particular restaurant has a strip steak on the menu.

If I were to order a strip, I would order it medium. Anything more than that gets delivered like a piece of shoe leather. Which is exactly what this was. The steak was tough and nothing like I ordered or expected.

The consistency wasn’t there. The restaurant destroyed any trust I had in them to deliver a meal like I ordered. My favorite meal was gone.

That was the last time we had dinner at that restaurant. It was probably a year ago. The trust was gone.

I LIKE IT LIKE I LIKE IT

Think of McDonald’s. When you order a Big Mac at McDonald’s, you expect it to taste exactly like the last Big Mac you purchased and ate. This is true whether you purchased your last Big Mac at the same restaurant, across town, in another state or around the world. You expect it to be consistent.

If the Big Mac you purchased today suddenly has mustard and sauerkraut on it, you would be a little hesitant to purchase another next time. You know what you want and want what you know. You want consistency.

Now, translate that consistency to your favorite television show. It may be a regular, primetime show, the evening news or a variety show. It really doesn’t matter.

All shows follow the same pattern. Your favorite show opens with some sort of theme. It’s the same opening for every show.

The show open probably introduces the main characters, actors or hosts. The open lets you know what to expect over the course of the show. If it is a sitcom, you might see a couple outtakes from previous episodes that define the character. If it is the news, you may see a tease for the stories coming up. If it is a variety show, they will probably tell you about the big events on this particular episode.

The show will then roll through the content.

Eventually, the show concludes in a consistent manner each time. The news will usually end with some sort of lighthearted kicker story. Variety shows may have a musical guest at the end. Dramas end happily ever after.

Every successful show follows a pattern. It is a consistent pattern. You want to know what you’re getting each and every time.

The consistency gained from the show structure helps the audience feel at ease and comfortable with the program. If your listener is new, she is brought up to speed quickly when you tell her what to expect.

If the listener is a returning participant, your introduction causes him to say to himself, “Oh, yeah. Exactly how I remember it. This is the right show.”

If you are watching the news and suddenly there are two new anchors along with different people doing the weather and sports, you will wonder if you’ve somehow stumbled upon the wrong channel. It will feel uncomfortable. It isn’t what you expected.

Consistency helps your audience feel at home. Work to achieve it every time.

You can build that consistency by creating a structure for your show that will allow you to fill the time with great content.

FIVE Ws

Just like a great news story, you can create a solid structure by defining by the Five Ws. Develop the structure of your show by determining Who, What, When, Where and Why. This structure will be the same for every show. The content of the show will vary within the structure and keep the show fresh.

Who will the audience hear on the show? Many podcasts are hosted by one or two individuals. These people are the only voices the audience hears. One person as the host is the easiest version. If you are the only person featured on your podcast, you can create the show whenever you’d like. The downside is the fact that you will need to fill the entire show with content while talking to yourself.

On the other hand, two hosts pose other problems. With two hosts, there is often no a leader of the show. The direction of the podcast is left to chance. If both are not in the same room, they will often talk over each other without the help of non-verbal cues. It requires much more work and planning to make a show with two hosts sound smooth.

There are many other versions of “who”. The host can interview a guest on each show. Callers can be part of your show with the appropriate equipment. The audience could interact with the show via e-mail. Any version of the “who” works.

Multiple styles can be combined as well, like a late night talk show. You simply need to select the style that makes you most comfortable and be consistent with it.

As you are deciding your “who”, determine what role each voice will fill. If there are two personalities with the same opinion, one of them isn’t necessary. You’ll just waste the listener’s time trying to get each personality mic time while communicating the same message. It would be very similar to debating yourself. There must be contrasting points of view between the personalities to justify the existence of each on the show.

What will be on your show? This includes topics, interviews, callers, e-mail, audio clips, highlights, sound bites, articles and other material you might include in your content. Your “what” might be answering e-mail from listeners with questions on your topic. Your “what” might be your comments and thoughts on various articles you’ve discovered on your topic. You could interview experts in your field.

As I mentioned in earlier podcast episodes, using the voice of the person asking the question is much more powerful than you reading an e-mail. That second voice adds depth to the conversation, adds validity to the question and creates a sense of eavesdropping on the conversation by the listener.

If at all possible, use audio to make your point. As you determine what will be on your show, find the “what” that excites you.

Do not get into a rut. Be creative. Find new ways to say the same thing.

When will you record and post your show? Find the time of day when you have the most energy to record your show. If you are a morning person, and you love getting up at the crack of dawn full of energy, record your show in the morning. If you enjoy staying up late long after everyone else has gone to bed, and the creative juices are just beginning to flow, choose to record at night. There is a time of day when your energy is highest.

You need to find the right time, because your energy level will be noticeable coming through the speakers. If you are tired, your audience will know. If you are smiling, your audience will be able to hear it. Find your sweet spot, and record at that time.

You do not necessarily need to post your show at the same time that you record it. You could record four shows on the same day and post them periodically over time.

If your content is time sensitive, you might need to post your show the same day you record it. For instance, if you’re discussing the day’s news or sports scores from last night, it might be stale if you wait a week to post it.

You simply need to be consistent with your posts. If you decide to post your show every Tuesday at 3p, your listeners will expect your show to be there on Tuesday at 3p. You can’t post it at 5p. The listener will not come back hoping it is there two hours late. That would be similar to the 6 o’clock news starting at 7:30. That’s not when you expect it and you wouldn’t tune it at 7:30 hoping the news is there.

Deliver on your promise. Post consistently.

You also need to decide how often you will create a show. It could be daily, weekly or monthly. It should definitely be regular and consistent to build an audience. Your fans need to trust that the show will be there when you say it will be there. Select a schedule that you can handle on a consistent basis.

Do not attempt a daily show if you cannot stick to that schedule. It is much better to post weekly and deliver too much than it is to attempt daily shows and miss a few. Humans are creatures of habit. If you can get them listening to your show as a habit every Wednesday at noon during their lunch break, use it to your advantage by posting consistently.

Where will you create your show? This is an important detail. Each episode of your show could come from your “studio”. You could also record your show on location if you are incorporating guests.

The technology available today will allow you to record almost anywhere. Find a place where you can focus on your show and control the surrounding ambient noise. You want the sound quality of your podcast to be as good as possible. However, don’t let that restrict your creativity.

Strive to make it good, but do not let perfect get in your way. Location is an important factor to the professional sound of your show. Content is as well. Balance the two.

Why are you creating a podcast? You need to find your passion. If you are creating a podcast for reasons other than your passions, you will find it difficult to keep up the consistency required to be successful.

Find the one thing that you love to discuss more than anything else. That should be the topic of your podcast. Chances are, you already know a ton about your passion topic. You will also find it easy and rewarding to discuss that topic. Money will typically follow you if you follow your passion.

Work to create that important trust ingredient by building consistent structure with your podcasts.

Create a structure for your podcast that will remain consistent for each show. The consistency will help build trust with your audience. Deliver to the expectations of your listener. That trust is the first step in monetizing your podcast.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Creating Word Of Mouth – Episode 071

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Creating Word Of Mouth – Episode 071

Word-Of-Mouth

How do you create a show that people remember? My theory is simple. If you want word of mouth do things worth talking about.

That particular phrase is one I learned from Seth Godin. However, I learned that theory years and years ago.

Learning From Radio

When I started in radio 25 years ago, my goal was to make every break a home run. Creating a show that creates buzz appears to be a daunting task.

A typical radio show is four hours. With an average of four talk breaks or bits an hour, a daily show would include sixteen bits a show. At three minutes a bit for a morning show, we talking about 48 minutes of material. That would roughly equal to an average podcast.

After a few years in radio, I realized that creating sixteen different pieces of content that are stellar and buzz-worthy is nearly impossible on a regular basis. It is also unnecessary. Your listener will not remember all sixteen things you do on the show this week.

People remember one big thing. Create the one killer bit that will create some buzz.

You can’t manufacture marketing and make people talk. The buzz is created when you do something amazing. To discover what is amazing, you need to continue to try different things.

You will be surprised by what moves people. People will mention hearing things on your show that you never dreamed would make a connection. The more you receive that feedback, the more you will be able to recognize it when it happens.

Be occasionally great rather than consistently good.

You don’t win by removing mistakes. You win by giving your audience a reason to listen. Occasionally great bits will give your listener those reasons.

If you conduct interviews on your show, you do not need to make every question Earth shattering. You need one or two great questions that people will remember. Your listener will say, “Did you hear what she asked her guest?” The answer will be one great question, not the entire interview.

Make your listener remember one thing. Consistently good is admission to the game. Occasionally great wins.

Examples of Occasionally Great

Let’s looks at some examples of both.

In baseball, who are some of the players that come to mind?

How about Willie Keeler and Jimmy Rollins? They hold the record for most Major League Baseball consecutive games with a hit.

Willie Keeler is #2 with 45 hits in 1896. Jimmy Rollins is #8 with 38 in 2005.

This means they consistently get on base. Valuable to the team. But hardly memorable.

How about Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth, Willie Mays, and Alex Rodriguez? These are the Top 5 of the list of players with the most Major League Baseball home runs.

Other than Babe Ruth at .342, the other four had batting averages between .298 and .305. In comparison, Keeler hit .341 in his career.

These home run guys got a hit less than one out of three tries. Less than stellar, yet memorable. Occasionally great.

Maybe American football is your sport.

Would you consider Chad Pennington one of the most memorable quarterbacks to every play the game? He holds a 66% career passing percentage in the National Football League over 10 seasons playing for 2 different teams. That puts him at #2 on the list.

Pennington completed 2 of every 3 passing attempts. Pretty consistent. Not quite memorable.

Could you put Bart Starr and Joe Namath on a list of great quarterbacks?

Bart Starr was the QB of Superbowl 1 & 2. Joe Namath was also a Superbowl quarterback. Their stories are legends.

Starr is #71 on the passing percentage list at 57% over 15 seasons. Namath is #163 on the same list at 50% over 8 seasons. Less consistent, but memorable.

Let’s talk acting.

Christopher Lee has made 276 movie and acting appearances. He has been in Dracula and The Lord Of The Rings.

Robert Loggia was in Scarface and made 223 other film and acting appearances.

You saw Ernie Hudson in The Crow. If not there, he was in 190 other movies and productions. You wold probably recognize him if you saw him.

All three are solid, consistent actors. They are hardly household names.

Every heard of Tom Hanks. He has only made 37 films and other appearances. Less than 20% of the number Hudson has appeared in. Less than 14% of Lee.

On the other hand, to date, Tom Hanks’ films have averaged $96.3M per movie. A few have been occasionally great and won Oscars. Not nearly the number of appearances. His home runs make up for it.

Will Smith has made 29 theatrical appearances. His movies average $127M. Fewer films. More blockbusters.

Will Smith is also known as a hip hop star. However, he has only released 4 solo albums. Two of his albums went gold. One is 2x platinum. One is 9x platinum.

Will Smith actually released more albums as half of DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince. That act released 5 albums. Three of those reached gold, one platinum and one 3x platinum.

These guys are all huge, because they are occasionally great.

Find Your One Thing

Don’t try to be everything to everyone. Be the best at one thing.

What are you known for? What is the one thing you can do on the episode this week that your listener will remember?

Find your one thing. Create word of mouth. Be occasionally great.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Magic Of Know, Like And Trust – Episode 067

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The Magic of Know, Like And Trust – Episode 067

Know, Like And Trust

It never ceases to astonish me how our podcasts create friendships with people we have never met.

My family and I were at a hockey game a few weeks ago. A couple came up to us and started chatting about the game as if they knew us. We had a great conversation with them as if we had been good friends for years.

When the couple moved on, my wife was a little irritated with me when she asked why I didn’t introduce her. I told her I didn’t know who they were.

These people knew me from being on the radio. I am part of their lives on a daily basis. I share things with them everyday on my show. These people feel like they know me and we are good friends even though we have never met.

This happens all of the time. As podcasters and broadcasters, we have a strange friendship with our listeners. That friendship give us influence.

How can we develop those friendships with our podcast?

Here are five tips.

1. Reveal Things

Reveal things about yourself on your show as you would to your good friends.

2. Include Your Listeners

Make your listeners part of your show. Don’t distance yourself from your listeners with e-mail and text messages. It is much more compelling to hear the words of another individual in their own voice than it is to hear someone else tell the story (or ask the question).

The passion of the message, story or questions isn’t contained in the e-mail. Inflection and meaning are always different when read by another individual. A scripted e-mail lack spontaneity.

I believe this is why interviews are so powerful. You can talk about a book, or you can interview the author. Which is more compelling?

3. Make Your Listener Feel Something

Emotions are powerful.

4. Be A Companion

Make your listener feel comfortable, as if they are spending time with a friend. They will come back time and again. You are their companionship.

5. Help People

Helping others should be your first priority.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Powerful Marketing With Podcast Benefits – Episode 065

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Listener Benefit Of Your Podcast – Episode 065

I was listening to the biography of Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson the other day. It really got me thinking about powerful marketing and how to create it.

The particular section of the book that caught my attention discussed the “1984” apple commercial. The message of the commercial was that apple would save humanity from conformity. It was a nod to George Orwell’s novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four”.

The “1984” commercial, when viewed by the Apple Board of Directors, was deemed unacceptable to air. The board suggested the advertising agency sell both the 30-second and 60-second time slots they had purchased during the 1984 during the Super Bowl.

The ad agency sold the :30, but didn’t try very hard to unload the :60. Jobs and a few others found the funds to run the commercial one time. The only other time it was aired was once on a few local stations.

With that one airing, the “1984” commercial created millions of dollars in buzz. Network news shows were talking about the commercial. It was the top commercial of the Super Bowl that year. In fact, Advertising Age magazine named the spot one of the Top 50 Greatest Commercials.

The commercial was almost never seen nationally.

What makes marketing like this so powerful? How can we make our podcast message that strong?

You vs. Me

Great marketing is like a mirror. It is a reflection of the customer, not of the company. Great products that use great marketing are focused on the needs, wants and desires of their customers. To turn your podcast into a great brand, focus on your listener and not on yourself.

Scheels had a great commercial for their snowboarding gear. The commercial was completely focused on the lifestyle of the snowboarder. It didn’t feature all of the great salespeople or wide aisles in the store or sale prices. The commercial was a mirror reflecting the customer.

To turn your information into engaging entertainment with your podcast, focus on the listener. Use words like “you” instead of “I”, “me” or “we”. Convey your content from the point of view of your listener. They will feel appreciated. They will be engaged. Your podcast will become a relationship. Success will follow. When it is You vs. Me, always pick you.

It’s the Snap, Crackle, Pop … Not the Puffed Rice

Rice. Sugar. Salt. Malt flavor. Mmmmm. I can’t wait to get a bowl of that!

Your listeners aren’t attracted by the contents of your show. They don’t care if your show discusses money or business or politics or sports. All your listener cares about is the benefits they will receive from your show.

Here are a few podcast descriptions I found today on iTunes.

“Those people that make videos on YouTube now have their own audio podcast. Hope you will stay awhile.”

“(unnamed podcast) produces original stories each week for families around the world. Each week on the (unnamed podcast), we’ll be sharing a free story from one of our original story series.”

“The world’s favorite podcast about old video games reaches its next stage! Join (hosts) and a variety of guests as they discuss the favorite games and topics of yesteryear.”

I’m sure these are solid podcasts. They were all listed in the “New & Noteworthy”. The content may be great, but the descriptions lack any snap, crackle or pop.

People get attracted to your show by the benefits, not ingredients.

Consumers by the fun of the Snap, Crackle & Pop. They aren’t buying the puffed rice.

Listeners are seeking the fun of learning life’s lessons through stories, not original stories for families.

The audience wants nostalgic memories of teenage afternoons wasted in the arcade in front of Donkey Kong, Ms. Pac Man and Dragon’s Lair, not discussion of your favorite games and topics.

When a listener decides to listen to your podcast, they ask, “What will this podcast do for me?” If the answer is topics and discussions, your listener is probably moving on. If it is nostalgic memories and comedic bits of “name that video game theme”, you might just entice him to check out your show.

There is a reason the fun of the experience is on the front of the box and the ingredients are relegated to the side. You need to sell the fun.

This week, examine your podcast description. Are you leading with the benefits? Are you selling the results? Make it exciting.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

When Did Marketing Become Taboo? – Episode 063

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When Did Marketing Become Taboo?

When Did Marketing Become Taboo

I was listening to Daniel J. Lewis on “The Audacity To Podcast” Sept. 15th episode “How To Deal With Negative Feedback Toward You”. When did commercials become bad?

Here is the comment/quote:

“I feel like I just listened to an hour long infomercial. Daniel, I recognize your need to cross-promote and I realize that your income comes from podcasting. I feel overloaded with commercial information and have quite a difficult time separating out the real content from the commercial content. It’s just too much. Sorting out the things I would consider using from the things I have tried in the past but didn’t work from the commercials just wasn’t worth the hour I wasted this afternoon listening to your podcast today.”

Daniel goes to great lengths to avoid being self-promotional. He mentions his products at the end or when it is contextually relevant. Hence the “I have a tough time separating out the real content from the commercial content”. If one blends into the other, it fits with the content. Daniel hardly creates his podcast to be one big commercial.

On the other hand, why are the product mentions so bad? How do you find out about great products? How did you find out about the last great movie you saw? How did you discover the last great book you read? Didn’t someone tell you about it? Regardless if that person was a friend or part of a marketing message, that communication helped you discover new things. That is what marketing is all about.

Sure, not every marketing message is going to be tailored to your needs. There will be some that might miss the mark. It could be the mass mailing you received from the pizza joint down the street because you have a family of 4. It could be the political flyer you received because of your party affiliation.

Is it that difficult to ignore the irrelevant? Throw it out.

So, how do we make our marketing message relevant? How do we make the message valuable instead of an interruption?

Are You Shouting?

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your product, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Daniel does the opposite in “The Audacity To Podcast”. He usually starts by helping his listener. Then, if it fits, he will recommend a product or service to his audience.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show”, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “The Audacity To Podcast” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

Why is it bad to sell? Why must podcasting be only altruistic? If I have something that might help you solve your problems, why would it be wrong to recommend it to you while making a few dollars at the same time?

If you loved mowing grass, would it be right to expect you to mow my grass for free? You love to do it. Why should I pay you? If it is acceptable to charge you for mowing your yard, why isn’t acceptable to earn some money for helping you with your business?

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour per week, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours. Help your audience fill those hours, too.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting? Develop the friendship by delivering companionship.

Are You Delivering What They Seek?

People listen to podcasts, the radio and other audio for companionship. They don’t want to drive alone. People have an inner desire to be around other people. Companionship is the reason people listen to your podcast, even if you are selling something. Your listener will always ask, “What’s in it for me?”

Make your listener feel comfortable, as if they are spending time with a friend. When people listen to guys like Adam Carolla, they feel like they know him. Women feel like they could actually hang out with Ellen DeGeneres when they watch her show. Leo Laporte comes across as your friend when you listen to his tech podcast. Each of these shows are about that comfortable connection.

When you make your listener feel comfortable, they will come back time and again. You are their companionship. Are you delivering what they seek?

This week, start with your listener in mind. Ask yourself, “What is in it for them?” I want you to feel confident about your content. You will not please everyone. Focus on your one target listener you have defined using the Target Listener Worksheet at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

If you upset a few people, they either get over it or they would never be your customer in the first place. At least you are doing something to make them care.

Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Get Noticed In A Sea Of Sameness – Episode 062

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Get Noticed In The Sea Of Sameness – Episode 062

Get Noticed

Being unique is the only way you can make your podcast get noticed in the sea of sameness. There are so many podcasts in your niche. Being memorable is critical.

There is one file in your listener’s mind that you occupy. You can’t occupy multiple files. You must pick one. Define that file and do all you can to support that image. That is the essence of your brand.

Where does McDonald’s fit in your brain file? McDonald’s is probably the “Fast Hamburgers” file? Does it also fill the “Milkshake File”? Probably not. Sure, they serve milkshakes. However, that file is probably occupied by your favorite ice cream shop.

cheetos lip balm

Where would Cheetos fit in your brain file? It would go in the “Lip Balm” file, right? Of course not. However, Frito-Lay launched Cheetos Lip Balm in 2005. It failed miserably, because Cheetos occupies the “Cheesy Puffed Snack” file in your brain.

Your podcast brand can only occupy one file. Pick the one image your brand can own? Define your brand.

When we create, we expose our perspective. We open ourselves to criticism. It is natural to want your thoughts, views, art and creation to be accepted by everyone. To avoid being disappointed, we often play it safe. Our creativity lacks creativity. It is risky to be truly creative. However, that is really the only way to get noticed. Safe blends in. Risky stands out.

To create engaging content with your podcast, you need to be unique. Your first idea will rarely be a truly unique idea. That first idea will usually be something you have done or seen done in the past.

Keep working the idea. Let it lead to other, more creative ideas. The more often you let your mind explore other options, the more often you will develop truly unique ideas. Don’t settle.

Always attempt to create something unique with your content. Do not settle for your first idea. Push yourself. Brainstorm. Let one idea lead to the next until you have a long list of ideas. Then, select the best idea from the bunch. You will usually find the best and most unique idea further down the list.

If you settle for your first idea, you content will become stale. You will continue to use ideas that have been used in the past. There will be nothing to engage your audience.

The unexpected creates amusement, delight and a memorable event. Being direct assumes your listener cares about your marketing message. They don’t. You need to be unique to be memorable. Be distinct, unusual, and unexpected.

Being unique is the only way you can make your podcast get noticed in the sea of sameness.

School of Podcasting

Congratulations to Dave Jackson over at the School of Podcasting. Dave was recently named the new Director of Podcasting for New Media Expo. NMX will be held April 13-16, 2015 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. It will also be held in conjunction with the NAB Show. NMX is always a great event and should be even better with Dave at the helm. I’m very excited about the show.

Podcast Review Show

Dave and I do a show together called the “Podcast Review Show”. You can learn how you can be a highlighted podcaster on the show by clicking HERE. We have added a new option to the show where podcasters do not necessarily need to appear on the show to have their podcast reviewed. Get all the details HERE.

Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Transform Your Podcast Into A Powerful Brand – Episode 061

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Transform Your Podcast Into A Powerful Brand – Episode 061

Podcast Into Powerful Brand

Two presentations I have attended really shaped my understanding and belief in the power of a brand. These two presentations have helped me create powerful radio and dominant brands. One was given by Seth Godin. The other came from B.J. Bueno.

A successful podcast is built on a strong relationship with the listener. It could be called a tribe as defined by Seth Godin in his book of the same name. The strong relationships with your listeners begin to develop your brand. You can then monetize your brand and associated relationships with an effective call-to-action. But it starts with the brand.

Powerful brands are more than just recognizable names. Powerful brands are full of emotion. A brand is a collection of perceptions, creating emotional connections, while consistently delivering on a promise. The more powerful the emotional connection, the more powerful the brand.

Take a moment to think of some very powerful brands and the associated emotions of the rabid fans of those brands. Nike. Volkswagen. Star Trek. Starbucks. Apple. Harley Davidson. Fans will go out of their way to interact with their favorite brand. These brands are unique, because they create powerful emotions within their fans that are not found in ordinary brands.

Ordinary brands lack emotion. Keds. Buick. Battlestar Galactica. Dunkin’ Donuts. Hewlett Packard. Honda. The powerful emotions are not present for most people in these brands.

These powerful brands are discussed in an amazing book entitled “The Power of Cult Branding” by Matthew W. Ragas and B. J. Bueno. The book describes the seven golden rules to cult branding. Emotion is the key to all seven. You can use these to transform your podcast into a powerful brand.

Social Groups

Great brands connect people who want to be different together. Examples include Star Trek and Harley Davidson.

Courage

Great brands show daring and determination, such as Oprah and Volkswagen.

Sell Lifestyle

Great brands sell lifestyle. These would include Apple and Jimmy Buffett.

Create Evangelists

Great brands create evangelists. I am sure you have encountered evangelists of Apple and WWE.

Contribution from Communities

Great brands accept contribution from communities. The communities around Linux, Star Trek, and WWE are influential in the development of the brand.

Inclusive

Great brands like Vans and Linux are inclusive and not some exclusive clique.

Personal Freedom

Great brands promote personal freedom. Apple and Linux let users be unique individuals.

All of these qualities are emotional. None are functional. It’s not the best, biggest, brightest, loudest, or #1 product. Cult brands are focused on emotion, not hype.

If you want to transform your podcast into a powerful brand that you can monetize with a strong call-to-action, stir emotion every time and be unique.
Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Secret To Know, Like And Trust – PTC Episode 057

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Secrets to Know, Like and Trust – PTC Episode 057
Four Essential Elements of Powerful Storytelling

Trust Me

WHY STORYTELLING

Have you noticed a lot of the business interview podcasts sound the same? We are hearing the same guests answer the same questions time and time again. How do you become unique in this sea of sameness?

Storytelling can transform your podcast. Your personal experiences and stories make you unique. No one has experienced the things you have experienced in the same way you have. If you want to stand out from every other podcast, share your personal stories during your show.

People do business with other people they know, like and trust. Your stories create that knowledge. That is where true friendships begin.

Stories help define your character and personality. If you want your listener to get to know you, share those personal connections. Connect, motivate and inspire your audience with your stories.

Don’t fit in, stand out.

Your personal experiences are the only way to make the content your own. Great songwriters do it. Great filmmakers do it. Share your stories and stand out.

ENGAGEMENT

In podcasting, you cannot afford to be boring. Interest in your story never remains constant. Your information can only become entertainment when interest is rising. A great story continues to develop the plot and raise the interest.

To create engagement, tell great stories. Keep the interest of your listener rising.

Date your listeners. You need to earn the privilege of talking to people who want to be talked to and selling things to people who want to be sold to. To earn that privilege, you need to build friendship.

Great friendships are developed through self revelation. When you share your personal thoughts and feelings with an individual through stories, you begin to create a bond with that person. It is life enrichment. Making our lives better through friendship is the reason we do not live is seclusion.

Over time, sharing stories will begin to build trust with your listener. Your stories share your values and beliefs.

Practice becoming a great storyteller.

GREAT STORYTELLERS

Practice being a great storyteller. Have the courage to listen to yourself. Hear and have courage to record your personal connections to the events happening around you.

When you use your podcast to create friendships, you are asking people to spend time with your every week. People share time with others that they like. They are asking themselves, “Would I enjoy taking a one-hour car ride with this person every week?”

People listen to audio while they drive, run and workout so they are not alone. They use the audio as companionship. Let your listener get to know you.

Your stories will also let others live vicariously through you. Your listener can enjoy your story of struggle and success without enduring the hard work and pain. Let them enjoy your stories.

ELEMENTS OF GREAT STORIES

There are four essential elements of great stories.

  • Engaging introduction
  • Reveal the details
  • Powerful Resolution
  • What else?

Engaging Introduction

Give them a reason to care. What do you want the audience to feel? Your stories make you human. Will it be humorous, compelling or tragic. My talent coach Bill McMahon would always ask, “What do you hope to make the audience laugh at, marvel at or better understand?”

Your listener can experience various emotions through your stories. You could elicit joy, sympathy, empathy, anger, tragedy, tenderness, humor, rage, patriotism or many others. Emotions make that personal connection to your story.

Pull your listener into the story. Your engaging introduction is a roadmap. It should be a solid headline that tells your listener exactly where your story will go. “Tell me if I’m gonna go to Hell for this…”

Reveal the details

Details are more believable than generalities. Your details will make your story come to life.

When you develop your details, use all 5 senses. Draw the picture in the mind’s eye of your listener. Make the story come to life. Put your listener right there in the moment. This is theater of the mind.

Your details reveal specifics about your thoughts, beliefs and character.

Resolution

Your resolution should be a powerful reframing of introduction. Your will know when you reach your conclusion when you have successfully achieved the emotional goal set at the beginning. What did you hope to make your audience laugh at, marvel at or better understand? When you’ve achieved that goal, get to the resolution.

What else?

Asking “What Else” will transform your show. Let your story lead to something bigger. Maybe you turn your story into a discussion on Facebook. Maybe your story leads into an interview. What else can you do with it? Create some great entertainment.

HOW YOU CAN BE A STORYTELLER

What do you want to make your listener feel?
What is the engaging set up?
How will it be revealed in the story with vivid details?
What is the resolution?
What else can you do with it?

I’d love to help you create great stories with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

3 Step To Create Your Avatar – PTC 055

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3 Steps To Create Your Avatar – PTC Episode 055

Hi Erik, thanks for your awesome podcast. I have one question for you You define your avatar with a bunch of well-crafted questions, but where do you get the data to answer them? Is it hard data you have got from your following (if any)? Is it just a fruit of your imagination? Is it a mix of both? How much of the avatar is based on hard data, and how much is a projection of yourself defining it? Thanks and keep up the awesome work!
-Alessandro

Create a unique avatar

Great question, Alessandro! It is actually a little bit of both. It will evolve over time.

Our goal is to create a vision of that one, unique, ideal listener.

There are really three steps to creating your ideal listener.  Each step relates to the life cycle of your podcast.

Step 1

If you are just starting out, you need to create your ideal customer out of your imagination.

  • Who would you like your ideal customer to be? Start there.
  • Who do you want?
  • Who will listen and get involved
  • Who will be best served by your content
  • Who will buy your stuff

Step 2

Once you begin to get some feedback from your audience, refine your target with that information.

  • Who is posting in your comments
  • Who is sending your e-mail
  • Who is asking for more information

Step 3

Finally, when you have an audience of decent size, survey them.

  • It does not need to be a formal survey
  • One of strongest is an e-mail often used that simply says “where an I help you”
  • To get specific demographic info, you will need a formal survey
  • Ask questions that will help you know and serve them better
  • Do not ask questions that will not give you info you can use and will only waste the time of your listener

Overall, you want your avatar to represent that individual that in most engaged with your show and likely to take action when you make that request.

Audience Of One

Knowing your target audience will allow you to treat your audience as an audience of one.

As you are creating your podcast, treat your audience like you are talking to each person individually. This is critical when creating a trusting relationship with your audience.

I hear many shows address their audience as a group with comments like “hello everyone” or “hey guys”. Each person in your audience is listening to you as an individual. Audio is a very personal medium. Many times, they are listening with headphones. It is just you and her. Talk to her just like that.

Addressing a crowd on the radio began when radio began. As radio was just being created, station owners needed content to broadcast. Radio programming began with rebroadcasting live, theater events. The person on the stage would address the crowd as “ladies and gentleman”.

As radio progressed, live audiences were eliminated. However, people on the radio continued to address the audience as a group. It was fitting. The family still gathered around the radio before television was introduced to the family room. An on-air personality could address the audience as a group and be justified in doing so.

Radio then became a personal medium. The television replaced the radio as family entertainment. In-car and headphones became the preferred method of radio listening. Each listener was now creating images and visions in his or her own head that were unique to their imagination. Their thoughts were different from those of any other listener. The conversation was now between the person on the air and the individual listening.

Unfortunately, radio personalities continued to address the listener as a group. “It has always been done this way.” The disconnect began.

Podcasts are even more individualistic than radio. Most people select a podcast because of their own tastes. Groupthink does not play a factor as it would to select a movie or television show for the family. It is one person listening on their own to a show that interests them.

If you are talking to your listener as if they are in a group, using plural terms like everyone and you guys and you all, your listener will wonder who you are addressing. They will think, “You guys? I’m listening by myself. Who are you talking to?” In the end, they will not follow your call-to-action, because they will think someone else in your “group” will handle it. Talk to an audience of one and build that relationship with each listener individually.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Stories Transform Your Podcast – PTC Episode 047

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Storytelling Transforms Your Podcast

Magazines

Have you noticed a lot of the business interview podcasts sound the same? We are hearing the same guests answer the same questions time and time again. How do you become unique in this sea of sameness?

Storytelling transforms your podcast.

People do business with people they know, like and trust. Stories help you develop that knowledge, likability and trust.

Your stories define you and will touch many more people than typical information. The stories you tell and the details you include reveal many things about you. That begins to develop that like and trust.

It can be a bit scary to reveal things about yourself on your podcast. Develop the ability to recognize your unique thoughts and the courage to reveal them on your show.

Two radio coaches have influenced me greatly over the years. They each have similar views on storytelling.

Radio consultant Randy Lane says use stories to “make it human by making it humorous, compelling or tragic”.

Radio talent coach Bill McMahon suggests you decide what you hope to make your audience “Laugh at, marvel at or better understand.”

How do you want your audience to feel after hearing your story? Frame that feeling in your engaging introduction. Decide what you hope to reveal about yourself with the story.

Stories help you connect, motivate and inspire.

There are four parts to the storytelling structure.

 

Engaging introduction

This pulls your listener right into the story. Your introduction should tell your listener exactly where the story is headed.

 

Vivid details

How will your emotion be revealed in the story? Use vivid details to make your story come to life in the theater of the mind.

 

Powerful conclusion

Wrap up the story by reframing of your engaging introduction.

 

What else?

Asking “What Else” will transform your show. Don’t let the story simply end and fade away. Turn it into something powerful.

Many treat a subject in a similar manner. That is why we hear the same style of interview. If you want to stand out and be different, transform you content by using your unique style.

“What Else” can we do with a compelling story? You could create a video, continue the conversation on social media, follow up with listener input in the following episode or various other things. Let your story lead to something bigger.

Ask “what else can we do” and see where it leads.

Storytelling transforms your podcast.

 

A few housekeeping notes this week.

Coupon code ends this week!

Get a one-hour coaching session with Dave Jackson and me for only $50 if you act before June 30, 2014.

Dave and I are now hosting the Podcast Review Show together. Our guests appear on the show to have their podcast reviewed by the two of us.

Typically, hiring the two of us individually for an hour would be hundreds of dollars. Not only do you get an hour of consulting from us on this show, you get to plug your show for a sixty minutes.

Our guests typically pay $99 to be featured on the show. Dave and I have decided to cut you a break. By using the code “coach50”, you can appear on the show for only $50.

You get half off. Still an hour. Still feedback from both of us. Still plugging your show. Half the price.

The code is “coach50”. This deal ends June 30, 2014. Get in on it now before we close it.

GET REVIEWED – CLICK HERE.

 

Podcast Movement

If you are truly serious about building your podcast, improving your show and increasing your traffic, you should also be attending the Podcast Movement in Dallas on August 16 & 17.

Find my affiliate link online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. We are only 8 weeks away from the Podcast Movement. Register today.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

 

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Your Effective Call To Action – PTC 045

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Effective Call To Action – PTC045

(photo by Albo)
(photo by Albo)

I was listening to an interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.  It makes your call to action powerful.

 

Selling is Easy

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspiring him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

We have discussed the call-to-action in previous episodes of Podcast Talent Coach. We simply need to determine what we hope to accomplish with our podcast episode before we begin recording.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

Building relationships with your podcast involves telling great stories. Revealing things about yourself through stories makes you real. Your listeners get to know and like you. As you continue to help them over time, you build the trust they seek.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. Your marketing and engaging relationship will have them ready for your call-to-action.

Do the hard work up front to make selling easy.

 

Shouting Will Not Help You

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your product, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show”, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “Smart Passive Income” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour per week, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours. Help your audience fill those hours, too.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting?

 

Ask For The Sale

After you’ve done the hard work building the relationship, don’t forget to ask for the sale.

One afternoon last week, I stopped by the quickie mart to get something to drink. As I waited in line at the cash register, the gentlemen in front of me set his purchase on the counter.

Among his items was a 2-liter bottle of soda. The bottle of soda was $1.69. The clerk said, “Did you know these are on sale two for $2? You can grab another and save yourself some money.”

The customers responds with, “Looks like I need to grab another bottle.”

By simply asking for the sale, the clerk doubled the purchase. The customer also benefitted by saving some money.

In fact, everyone wins in this transaction. The store is paying the clerk an hourly wage whether he sells one bottle of soda or 100. The cost of the clerk’s time to the store remains constant. Wages are the biggest expense to the store when figuring cost of goods sold. Therefore, by adding another bottle of soda to the purchase, even at the lower price, the store makes more money also.

It all happened because the clerk asked for the sale.

 

This week, review your show to ensure you are building those relationships.

• Start with the listener instead of your product or service

• Determine how you are going to help your listener with this episode

• Put a strong call-to-action at the end of the episode

 

Let’s Work Together

I would love to help you with your podcast. If you would like to improve your content, call-to-action and business, I have a few openings for coaching clients.

You need to be serious about making some money with your podcast. It may not be millions. However, you need to have the desire to make a little money.

We will work together to build a customized plan for you, your show and your business.

We have to date before we can get serious, right?

I’m offering a complimentary coaching call to a few candidates who are serious about their improvement. We need to see if we are a good fit for each other.

There will be no high pressure sales pitch. We can review your show to see if we work well together. If it clicks, we can lay out a coaching plan for you. If the call is not all you had hoped, no harm. We’ll just continue on as friends.

There is only room for a few. My calendar simply will not allow me to coach everyone.

If you are interested … and serious … e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. We can get the conversation started.

 

Find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Your Podcast Brand Revisited – PTC 044

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Your Podcast Brand Revisited – PTC044

Headphones

This week, we revisit my most popular episode. This episode has been downloaded almost twice as many times as any other episode I have released.

Maybe you missed it. Maybe you caught it and this will be a great refresher. Either way, I have received great feedback on the content and I am sure you will enjoy it.

On this episode, we discuss how to turn you, your content and your podcast into a brand. How do you create that powerful podcast brand to stand out amongst the sea of podcasts that are available online?

Find the original show notes HERE.

 

A few housekeeping notes this week.

Get a one-hour coaching session with Dave Jackson and me for only $50 if you act before June 30, 2014.

Dave and I are now hosting the Podcast Review Show together. Our guests appear on the show to have their podcast reviewed by the two of us.

Typically, hiring the two of us individually for an hour would be hundreds of dollars. Not only do you get an hour of consulting from us on this show, you get to plug your show for a sixty minutes.

Our guests typically pay $99 to be featured on the show. I’ve convinced Dave to cut you a break. By using the code “coach50”, you can appear on the show for only $50.

You get half off. Still an hour. Still feedback from both of us. Still plugging your show. Half the price.

The code is “coach50”. This deal ends June 30, 2014. Get in on it now before we close it.

GET REVIEWED – CLICK HERE.

 

If you are truly serious about building your podcast, improving your show and increasing your traffic, you should also be attending the Podcast Movement in Dallas on August 16 & 17.

Find my affiliate link online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. We are only 10 weeks away from the Podcast Movement. Register today.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Memorable Podcast Brand – PTC Episode 042

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Memorable Podcast Brand – Episode 042

Have you noticed all of the interview shows popping up lately?

It seems everyone wants to have an interview podcast. Many simply copy the other successful interview podcasts and hope to stand out. How can you be different while being the same?

Jared Easley and I were talking the other day. He publishes the wonderful podcast “Starve The Doubts”. We were discussing his approach to make his interview show stand out amongst the sea of sameness.

Jared creates a unique approach to the interview show in a couple different ways. First, he not only has a guest to interview on his show, he also has a guest interviewer join him to ask the questions. This gives the show an extra dimension. The questions on every interview have a little different perspective.

Second, Jared asks unique questions. He opens every show asking about the guests favorite concert. He then sprinkles in “would you rather” and “fill in the blank” questions. Jared does his homework on every guest to create questions that are well-informed.

These two steps help to create a unique interview experience and overall solid, memorable podcast.

 

Be Memorable

If you want to keep your listener coming back show after show, you need to make them remember to come back. You need to remain top-of-mind for your listener. That is the purpose of audience engagement. Make your listener remember you for something specific about your show.

As you build your show, make it about one thing. Find one particular thing that will be remembered. If you try to be all things to all people, you will water down the show. Everything will be nice. However, isn’t usually truly memorable. You will get lost in the millions of messages your listener receives on a daily basis.

Find one point that you can make amazing. Take it over the top. Make it the “goodbye” scene in “Titanic”. Make it the “I am your father” scene in “Empire Strikes Back” between Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader. Your particular point could be the point where you assure your caller that everything will be ok. It could be the fantastic story of your brush with celebrity. It is your show. Find the magic.

Stir emotion. Make it amazing. Bring your listener back. Be memorable.

 

Do They Remember?

When you consider the entertainment options podcast listeners have, the importance of creating a powerful brand really becomes apparent.

I searched iTunes for podcasts about hockey. There are hundreds of hockey podcasts available. Thousands and thousands of episodes exist that deal with hockey. You can find various topics, including drills, NHL teams, coaching, fantasy hockey and many more.

How do you stand out? How do you get noticed?

Your listener needs to remember your podcast, so they can return and listen again. That is the way to build a following. It really doesn’t matter how many people listen today. What builds a strong podcast is the number of listeners that come back the next time, and the next time, and the time after that. You build your audience slowly with more listeners this week than you had last week. Get your listener to remember to return.

Using your brand to create strong relationships with your listeners is critical to the health of your podcast. If you are bland, you will get lost in the sea of average. There are over 100,000 podcasts available for consumption. Most of them are average or worse. If you refine your content, turn your information into entertainment, and transform your podcast into powerful relationships, you will easily stand out from the crowd. It is a must not only for your success, but your mere survival. Begin your brand today.

 

The Memorable Podcast Brand Uses Cows

The unexpected is amusing, delightful and memorable. Being direct assumes your listener cares about your marketing message. They don’t. Your listener cares about his or her needs, wants and desires. Attract their attention by doing the unexpected.

To engage your podcast listener and create a relationship, you need to be memorable. In order to be memorable, you must be unique. Be distinct, unusual, and unexpected. If you sound like every other show, you will not stand out and get noticed.

Chick-fil-a could have easily become another fast food restaurant lost in the sea of mediocrity. Founder Truett Cathy wouldn’t let that happen. The company pays great attention to the details and does the unexpected at every turn.

The Chick-fil-a mission statement is, “Be America’s Best Quick-Service Restaurant.” Sure, every fast food joint wants to be the best. Few are willing to put in the work.

One Saturday, we were on a road trip. We were passing through Des Moines, IA at 8:45p as we pulled into the mall to grab a quick bite. We found out the mall closed at 9p. As you can imagine, most restaurants in the food court were cleaning up. We were one of two parties there to eat.

We stepped up to the Chick-fil-a counter and apologized for cutting it so close and causing them extra work. The gentleman behind the counter assured us it was no trouble at all. We received our (fresh) food quickly and grabbed a table in the middle of the food court.

About five minutes later, the Chick-fil-a employee came to our food court table to make sure everything was alright. This was a mall food court. Few fast food restaurants ever check on you in their own establishment. You especially do not receive this sort of attention 10 minutes before closing.

That level of service is the norm at Chick-fil-a. They always take the extra step to surprise and stand out. It is carried through to the careers they offer, the scholarships they provide to their employees and the process of accepting partners and franchisees.

The company uses cows in their commercials to promote chicken sandwiches. The Chick-fil-a website even has a special section devoted to the cows. When a cow parachutes into a football game promoting chicken sandwiches, it us unexpected. Chick-fil-a is memorable.

If you can create unique, memorable experiences for your listener by incorporating the unexpected, you begin to create powerful, meaningful relationships.

Are you using your own cows in your podcast?

 

The Memorable Podcast Brand Swings For The Fence

Rather than being consistently good with your podcast, be occasionally great.

Your listener will remember one big thing from your show. They will not remember every detail, every comment or every e-mail answer. They will remember that one thing you did. Each show, try to make one big splash that will be memorable.

Swing for the fence.

Many know the great Babe Ruth as one of the greatest home run hitters in baseball. Many also know that Ruth struck out roughly twice as often as the league average. He struck out 1,330 times.

Babe set out to do something exciting. We wanted to be memorable. Sometimes, that meant striking out.

People don’t remember all of the singles Babe hit. Even though he is 2nd all-time with his on-base percentage of .474, nobody talks about all the times Ruth got on base. He had 1,517 singles and 506 doubles to his 714 home runs. That is nearly twice as many singles as homers. Doubles and home runs were just about equal.

Why do people remember all of the home runs? Because they were exciting. Babe was occasionally great. He was great often enough to be memorable.

You don’t have to set records. Simply make your podcast occasionally great. Nobody remembers your strikeouts. Don’t worry about them. When you finally hit the home run, people will remember.

Every now and then, swing for the fence

 

Risky Stands Out For The Memorable Podcast Brand

As we develop meaningful relationships with your podcast, we in turn build credibility that will support our call-to-action within your show. To develop strong relationships, you need to create engaging entertainment that will get you remembered by your listener. To be remembered, you must stand out.

You stand out when you are loved. You are remembered when you are hated. You fade into the background when you are plain, vanilla and trying to not upset anyone. If you don’t stir strong emotions, you are easily forgotten.

When we create, we expose our perspective. We open ourselves to criticism. It is natural to want your thoughts, views, art and creation to be accepted by everyone. To avoid being disappointed, we often play it safe.

Those fantastic, memorable personalities are usually both loved and hated. Rush Limbaugh is loved by the conservatives and hated by the liberals. Dave Ramsey is loved by the conservative investor and hated by credit card companies and whole life insurance salespeople. Dr. Laura Schlessinger would consistently be critical of her callers. Yet she would receive more callers than she could handle on any given show.

Safety lacks creativity. It is risky to be truly creative. However, that is really the only way to get noticed. Safe blends in. Risky stands out.

Create that memorable podcast brand to keep your listener coming back show after show. Remain top-of-mind for your listener. Make them remember to come back next week.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Gender Marketing Difference – PTC Episode 040

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THE GENDER MARKETING DIFFERENCE – PTC EPISODE 40

There is a big difference between marketing to men and marketing to women. The book “Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus” by John Gray, Ph. D. discussed in great detail the communication and relationship differences between men and women. These differences are critical in marketing. They are also important elements to your podcast strategy.

I’ll be speaking at the Podcast Movement in Dallas August 16th & 17th. My affiliate link is online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. I will be doing a session on this very topic showing you how to make use of these marketing tactics in your podcast.

Today, we are going to cover five major differences you need to consider when marketing to the different genders. Keep these differences in mind when you are shaping your podcast content.

Please understand that I am speaking in generalities. I understand these statements won’t hold true for every person. These points are are simply how most men and women react in common situations. The definition of stereotype is “a simplified and standardized conception or image invested with special meaning and held in common by members of a group” There are times when the stereotypical case will not hold true for a specific situation. Most of the time, this is the case.

 

THINKING

In a broad sense, men tend to think very linearly. Women usually think very spatially. To be effective communicating with each gender, you must understand these differences. You must also select one to target. The same message will have difficulty reaching both genders effectively.

 

PROBLEM SOLVING

Men and women also take different approaches in the way they solve the problems. Because men think linearly, men focus on the solution. Men try to determine what steps are needed to reach a successful outcome. If a man is in need of a new car, he will find the solution step by step. A man will review his options, compare the features, determine the best buy for the money that will do the job, and make the purchase. Men typically move through a problem step-by-step. If the steps are all completed successfully, he buys the vehicle.

Because women tend to think globally, they are typically concerned with the way their relationships are affected by problems and the possible solutions. A woman tends to consider how each person in her close circle is affected by each possible solution. If she is in need of a new car, she will typically consider her needs and those of her family. Will her kids be safe? Is there enough room for everyone? Will the features please her family? Are there entertainment features available to keep her kids occupied on trips? She will also consider how her friends will view the purchase and if she is being treated right by the salesperson. If the relationships all benefit from the purchase, she buys the vehicle.

You can see evidence of this difference in the way auto makers market to the different genders. Minivans aimed toward women will play up the features for the entire family. The commercial will depict the envy of the neighbors. The storyline may even show mom juggling soccer practice, shopping, carpooling and work. These commercials tend to be very spatial in nature and focused on relationships.

Commercials for trucks that are targeted toward men will usually tout the problem solving ability of the truck. The script will play up the horsepower, torque and hauling capacity of the truck. The commercial will usually show the truck pulling some ridiculously heavy load, like trees or ships or something. Men will be convinced they can get the job done with this particular truck. The steps are very linear.

When handling tasks, men tend to be single-minded and focused on one goal, while women usually multitask well. This difference probably began with the cavemen. Each had well-defined duties in the household back in the cave.

Cavemen would set out to find dinner and bring it home. He had one task with one goal. Women handled the entire household doing many things at one time. Men needed to be very focused to find dinner without being eaten by a tiger. Women needed to multitask in order to tend to the house (or cave), handle the children and keep the family in line all at the same time.

You can see this difference in society today. When men are watching television, they watch television. When men attend a sporting event, they watch the event. Men are typically focused on the thing they are doing. This is usually true even if they are doing it with friends.

Women, on the other hand, typically have the ability to multitask very well. Women can be cooking 3 different dishes for dinner, talking on the phone, and keeping an eye on the evening news all while being fully aware of what the children are doing in the other room. Women multitask in a way that astonishes men. Men cannot understand why women spend an entire baseball game talking with the people around her rather than watching the game. Men are there to watch the game. Women attend because it is a way to socialize and strengthen her relationships. She enjoys the game for much different reasons.

The tendency to focus on one task or many creates another interesting difference between men and women. Because they tend to multitask and focus on multiple items simultaneously, women do not seem to tire of activities as quickly as men. When men focus on one thing only, they will become bored with that particular item before a woman. Men will want to move on to the next thing. Therefore, men tend to like new and different. They tend to appreciate change more than women. Women will tolerate repetition much more than men, because they are not as focused on one item at a time. It may also take more messages in different ways to effectively reach and influence a woman.

Men and women also differ in the way they remember things and events. Again, men are linear. Women are spatial.

 

COMMUNICATING

Men typically view communication and problems solving as a way to show their strength and power. Men typically see things as a competition. It is a linear approach. They seek validation by solving problems. When men are communicating with each other, you will often see each attempt to “one-up” the other. You will often hear, “Oh, you think that’s bad. One time something worse happened to me.” Other men do not typically take offense to these comments. These challenges are a way for men to show their power and dominance.

Women use communication and problem solving for much different purposes. Women use both as a way to strengthen the relationship. Women seek understanding when tackling a problem. Rather than seeking validation, women are typically seeking empathy from and an opportunity to bond with their communication partner. You will rarely hear a woman try to “one-up” the person with which they are communicating. However, you will hear, “Oh, that’s terrible. What did you do?”

When I go out to lunch with my buddies, we have a good time. When I get home, my wife will ask me what we talked about. I will tell her, “Nothing really. Sports and politics.” She finds it baffling that we didn’t discuss his son’s birthday or our family vacation. We debate the nuances of professional versus college sports. We might discuss the benefits of one political candidate over another. That’s how men communicate. Men use a friendly challenge to bond. Women tend to see that style as a lack of understanding.

 

RELATIONSHIPS

Men and women also handle relationship problems differently. Just like problems in any other area of life, men typically seek the solution (linear) while women tend to use problems to strengthen the relationship (spatial). Understand these differences as you build your relationship with your audience.

Let’s take a typical, hypothetical couple. Tina and Adam have been together for 3 years. Their standard Friday night is eating take out and watching TV. Tina says, “Adam, we never go out anymore.” In Tina’s head, she is thinking, “Our relationship needs more ‘us’ time. We don’t spend enough time together having fun.” Adam replies, “Fine, let’s go out tomorrow night.” Adam is thinking, “Done, problem solved.” Tina then gets a little more aggressive with, “That’s not what I mean.” Now Adam is really confused. “You just said we don’t go out enough. Let’s go out tomorrow night. What’s the problem.” Tina says, “I’m not just talking about going out.”

Conversations similar to these fall apart, because men and women approach the problem in much different ways. Women use the conversation to strengthen the relationship. Men use communication to solve the problem. “Going out tomorrow night” means different things to each of them.

 

MEMORIES

When men remember events, they tend to remember in a linear fashion. They will remember events in sequence as one thing happened, then the next and finally the last. It is a sequential time line. If a man were recalling a party, they would typically begin with the setting and who arrived first. He would walk through the time line of the party. His description might begin with, “Things got going in the kitchen. We moved downstairs and shot some pool. Paul had a bit too much to drink and after he broke the lamp trying to dance, the party came to a halt and everyone headed home.” It is a step-by-step recollection of the events.

Women typically remember events in a very spatial way. They will remember who attended the party. They will remember the great time that was had by everyone. Women will recall some of the great conversations that took place. The memories would possibly include the laughs, the gathering places and the details of the atmosphere. The recollections of women tend to be global in nature.

These differences between men and women will play an important role as you define your target audience. Will your communication be spatial or linear? This is something you’ll need to decide before you can move forward to create the structure and content of your show.

Gender is only one characteristic of your target audience. There are many others to consider. Just as if you were describing one individual person, gender would only be one characteristic of that person.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Podcast Negativity Trap – PTC Episode 036

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Podcast Negativity Trap – PTC Episode 036

A quick note … Dave Jackson of School of Podcasting has invited me to join his Podcast Review Show podcast. Each week, we invite a podcaster on the show and review their podcast with them. Dave and I help our guest refine their content, delivery, production, branding and website. If you would like to find our more, head over to PodcastReviewShow.com.

This week on Podcast Talent Coach, we get a question submitted by Steve Stewart of the “Money Plan SOS Podcast” Steve brings up two questions. With all of the negativity surrounding us and pulling us in, how can we keep on a path of positive messages? How can you be passionate without being negative?

It is good to recognize the negative influence in our content. Negativity surrounds us everyday, making it difficult to stay positive. The nightly news uses the philosophy “if it bleeds it leads”. The political talk shows are typically more about the negatives of the opposition rather than the virtues of their position. The Sunday morning political talk shows in the U.S. Are all a battle with a “sky is falling” mentality.

Negativity attracts people. Many people have a desire to run from the negative rather than toward the positive. Many want to quit their job. However, few have any idea where they want to head. A cynical, sarcastic, mean attitude will simply pull successful people down rather than build anyone up.

If bad news and negativity attract an audience, why change? If conspiracy theories and stories of the world ending keeps people coming back, why get rid of it? If it ain’t broke, why fix it?

Negativity in your life is destructive.

If you believe you are what you think about, then we need to remove the negativity from our lives. This theory is present in many books. You will find it in Napoleon Hill’s “Think & Grow Rich”. It is the main idea in “The Strangest Secret” by Earl Nightengale. It is difficult to have a positive attitude in life if you are talking about negativity in every episode.

In the long run, negative content in your podcast will harm you and your listener.

I have stopped watching the news. I don’t want that negativity in my life. What good does it do me to see pain and agony in the lives of others?

What is the solution? Our content can’t be all tulips and licorice. We can’t look at the world through rose-colored glasses. How do we create the balance?

First, we can’t make your show great by simply removing the bad stuff. We need to replace the bad content with more of the good stuff.

Have you ever tried to stop doing something? Smoking? Eating fast food? The secret is that you can’t stop something without replacing it with something else. Many people that try to stop smoking gain weight. Food replaces cigarettes.

There are four steps you can take to maintain a positive attitude and overtone in your podcast.

 

Positive Solutions

With your content, lead people to positive solutions. Start by identifying the negative. Then, replace those ideas with positive solutions. Show people better options. Give them help & hope.

 

Use Proper Planning

Know how to get to the good in the story and where you plan to go before you begin recording.

 

Review Your Show

Find the parts of your show where negativity appears. Then, determine how you could have lead the topic in a positive direction. Over time, you will become better getting to the positive during the show.

 

Stick To The Tough Work

The negativity trap is the easy path. Being positive is tough work. In the long run, it will be better for you and your listeners. Your audience will grow more slowly. However, it will be more loyal over the long run. Negativity wears out its welcome quickly. A positive attitude will help your podcast develop longevity.

 

The negativity trap is destructive to your podcast. It is unhealthy for you and your listeners. Being positive is hard work. Be confident, and stick to it. Over time, it will be better for your show. Help your listener find the positive in her life. Help her overcome her challenges and solve her problems. Lead her to better results. Positivity helps develop long-term success for your show.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Consistent Podcast Brand Message – PTC Episode 026

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Consistent Podcast Brand Message – PTC Episode 026

New Media Expo 2014 in Las Vegas at the beginning of January was an amazing experience. Every podcaster I met was interested in sharing the knowledge. I discovered many new podcasts. The best part of the event was meeting so many fantastic people.

One common theme came to light as I listened to so many people sharing their ideas. Podcasters are always looking for new things to talk about on their show. They want to keep their content fresh.

It is understandable that podcasters want to continue to deliver new content. You want to keep your listeners returning for new ideas. Delivering the same message over and over may get boring and stale. However, when you stray too far from the core message, you run the risk of diluting your brand.

There is a podcast about business and marketing. I would listen to it on a regular basis. This went on for a few months.

I began noticing the show would post inconsistently. Sometimes it would be weekly. Other times a new episode wouldn’t show up for a month. I never knew what to expect.

The show as hosted by two people in different locations. During some episodes they would talk about hiking. There were times they would discuss the weather differences between the two cities. Many times the discussions were not pertinent to the topic of business.

The hosts would also answer all sorts of questions that came in, regardless of topic relevance. It sounded as if they answered every e-mail they received. There was such a variety of topics that I sometimes wondered if they changed the focus of the show.

I had come to this show to learn something about business and marketing. The show looked like it might have some information I could use in my business. Unfortunately, it seldom delivered on the promise of the show brand. The show was too inconsistent.

Eventually, I unsubscribed.

There are hundreds of podcasts about business and marketing. If you want to stand out from the crowd, you need to be unique, be the best, be exciting, and be consistent.

Frequency to the target is the way to get your audience to remember your show. So, how can you be unique and consistent at the same time? How do you deliver a consistent message without getting boring or stale? How can you keep your content fresh while delivering the information your audience expects from your show?

There are five ways to deliver a consistent message with your podcast without getting stale.

 

1. Say the same things with different words.

Find different ways to package your message. Keep the brand message consistent. Simply find new ways to illustrate your point.

On The Dave Ramsey Show, Dave teaches his seven baby steps to get out of debt and build wealth. His entire show is based around those seven steps. Nearly every call and question comes back to one of those steps. He has built an empire and 20-year radio show around seven steps. It’s the same thing on every show. Dave simply finds new ways to illustrate the method. Consistent message. New ways to say it.

When looking for new ways to frame your brand message, you could approach the subject in many ways. It could be from your point of view or the listeners point of view. It could be in relation to the elderly or young. You could describe it through the eyes of somebody from another country or somebody that speaks a different language. How would the rich and poor see it differently? Describe how a beginner might use your information. Then, describe it from the standpoint of a professional. Those are ten different ways to communicate the same message using different words.

 

2. Give it context

Day O’Day is one of my mentors. I have been to many of his seminars and purchased quite a few of his products. He works with radio people in crafting their sales message and production values.

In one of his presentations, Dan gave a fantastic example of context. Dan asked, “Is it wrong to take medication from a coworker’s desk?” How would you answer that question?

Then, Dan gave the question some context.

What if someone in your office was having a heart attack and that medication was the only thing that could save them?

That is the definition of context. On the surface, sure, taking medicine is wrong. Give the story some context, and you might just change your mind.

 

3. Decide on the perspective for the story

What is your position on the subject? Take a stand. If you don’t care enough to be on one side or the other, how can you expect your audience to pick a side and care?

What do you hope to communicate with this topic? What is the one thing you want your audience to remember about this episode? Answer those two questions and you will begin to define your perspective.

Pick an angle that will really make the story stand out. If you are discussing hunger in Africa, you could tell the story from the point of view of an energetic volunteer, a hopeless child experiencing it firsthand, a frustrated government worker fighting the bureaucracy, or an immigrant to this country who has discovered new hope. Different perspectives communicate different messages.

 

4. Communicate with passion

Love what you do. It is much easier to find different ways to say the same thing when you love what you do. Be passionate about a topic, and you’ll be able to talk about it all day long.

Excitement and passion are contagious. If you are excited about your topic, your listener will be engaged and excited as well. Have you ever met that person that was so excited to talk about a subject that you found yourself getting sucked into a conversation that wouldn’t have had any interest to you at any other time? 30 minutes later you realize you’re still talking about the same subject.

Make them love you or hate you. Either way you are making them care. The middle is boring. Nobody has ever said, “Wow, did you hear the show today? He really had no opinion one way or the other.” Push people to pick a side. You will make the emotionally vested in your show.

 

5. Sell the sizzle

Consumers don’t by products. They buy the benefit of those products. People don’t want products and services. They want their problems solved. What problem will your product or service solve?

People will buy the results and benefits of your product or service.

Be consistent with your benefit message. Find different ways to deliver the message of your benefit in different ways. We are transforming your information into engaging entertainment. Information sounds like a boring message. Let’s juice up your content and make it engaging. Sell the sizzle.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find worksheets and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Podcast Brand Positioning – PTC Episode 025

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Podcast Brand Positioning – PTC 025

At NMX 2014 in Las Vegas at the beginning of January, I discovered a ton of great podcasts and met many new, fantastic people. Here are a few of the new podcasts I’ve been enjoying lately.

As I was listening to new podcasts, I heard one particular show get concerned over a critical review he received from anonymous individual. I understand podcasters are concerned with reviews. Your show is your art. It is your baby they are calling ugly.

Please remember, one listener is such a small percentage of your overall listenership. There will always be somebody critical of you and your point of view. If you have 100 listeners, that is only 1% of your audience.

If you have people commenting one way or the other, positively or negatively, at least you are making them care. Trying to ride the fence is a lonely place. Stir some emotion.

Your firm dedication to your position is critical for your brand. Stand for something. Politicians aren’t trusted, because they constantly change their mind.

Be concrete in your beliefs. If you love something, shout it from the rooftops. If you really dislike something, be open about it. Either way, stand your ground for the health of your brand.

 

On the show this week, we discuss …

7 Ways To Protect The Positioning Of Your Podcast Brand

1. Talk about what you care about – Find topics that excite you

2. Show prep – Know your position

3. Have a goal for every episode – When listening to “Smart Passive Income” with Pat Flynn, Pat said podcasters and speakers should always ask, “What transformation do you hope to have happen for your audience?”

4. Make it interesting by being interested – Even with guests

5. Don’t take the first idea, work a topic

  • Various things to do with a topic
  • Doesn’t always have to be an interview
  • Parody song, skit, long form report with natural sound (experience), demonstration

6. Never be boring – Do something unexpected

7. Have a strategy – Not only what you hope to accomplish, but how to accomplish & how it affects the brand.

Shout out to Kathy Kelly at “Special Mouse” podcast. The show is described as “Disney parks and travel planning for guests with a wide variety of health issues and special needs.” www.SpecialMouse.com.

Mario from www.210LocalMedia.com. This show is described as “Art, music, film & entertainment around San Antonio, Texas.”

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Making Your Podcast Brand Stronger – PTC Episode 024

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Making Your Podcast Brand Stronger

This past weekend, I was reading a book by Michael Gerber called “Awakening The Entrepreneur Within“.  Mr. Gerber is the author of the E-Myth series and founder of the company of the same name.

In his book, Mr. Gerber mentions fighting with the internal critic that strikes so many entrepreneurs.  This fight didn’t happen while launching E-myth.  It happened 30 years later, after he was incredibly successful, and while launching a new business.

When I discovered a great entrepreneur like Michael Gerber fights the impostor syndrome, I realized it is only human nature.  We all struggle with that internal critic.  One way to overcome that critic is to continually improve.

To make your podcast brand stronger, it takes consistent improvement.  To achieve constant improvement, you should review your show on a regular basis. Actually listen like a listener. That is the only way to improve.

Many hosts finish recording a show and think, “That was pretty good. What’s next?” They might recreate parts of the show in their head to determine what might make the show better next time. Usually, there isn’t much time spent actually reviewing a show. There are so many other duties to handle. It’s on to the next thing, which is probably editing, posting, and promoting the show.

In order to make your podcast better, you need to spend quality time listening to the show. Play it back. Grab a pad of paper and write down the parts that jump out at you. Jot down the “oh wow” moments. Take note of the sections that didn’t work exactly as you planned. (read more)

In this episode, we cover the questions outlined in the Podcast Talent Coach Show Review Worksheet. Those questions include:

– What did you hope to accomplish on this show? Did you succeed?

– How did you make the audience care?

– Where were the “oh wow” moments?

– Where were the surprises?

– What were the powerful words you used?

– What did you like about the show?

– What was memorable about the show?

– What worked?

– What could have been better?

– How did you position the story from the listener’s point of view?

– How did you include the listener, making them part of the story?

– At what points did you introduce and reset the show/topic?

– How did it appear you were prepared for every element?

– What did you reveal about yourself to help foster the relationship with the audience?

– What stories did you tell?

– What details did you use that were spectacular and visual?

– Where did you use active language? (walking instead of walked, eating, not ate)

– What crutches do you use that need to be removed?

– What is your plan to make tomorrow better?

 

Review each episode for continuous improvement.  Fight your internal critic.  Have confidence in yourself and be your best.  You will be well on your way to making your podcast brand stronger with every episode.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find this worksheet and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Power Of You – PTC Episode 023

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The Power Of You

This week is a little self-reflection. I’m not sure I’m doing my job with my message and serving you as well as I can. Is my communication cutting through in the correct way?

This past weekend, I attended the New Media Expo (NMX) 2014 in Las Vegas. I had an incredible time and learned a lot. The inspiration I receive by attending these conferences is amazing.

The only thing more incredible than the inspiration is the friendships. Mike & Izabela from Music Radio Creative held a meet up at an amazing wine cellar within the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. We all had an incredible time mingling with other amazing podcasters. Mike & Izabela held the gathering in a room of the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room at the Rio. It was like sitting in their living room with couches, chairs and end tables near a bar filled with wine and cheese. The intimate setting really spawned some great discussions.

During the meet up, I had the chance to sit down with Kenn Blanchard from “Black Man With A Gun”, Dave Jackson from “School of Podcasting” and Rem Lavictoire from “The Sci-Fi Movie Podcast”. We had a great time sharing stories about our lives and podcasting. It was a gift.

Kenn mentioned to me that he wasn’t sure how my podcast would be received. He said I was so passionate and determined about my style that he felt it might turn some people off. I loved the feedback. His words really got me thinking.

I stepped back and assessed my message. Is my message really being communicated they way I hope it is? That leads us to the podcast this week.

My message is all about you. I never want to tell you how you should do anything. I want to show you ways it may be done and let you decide. I want you to be you in a way that only you can do it. It isn’t a prescription. It should be a thought starter.

There are a few things I wholeheartedly believe about any podcast, such as podcasts should be built to attract and grow an audience. I also believe every podcaster should be their own unique self. How that happens should be completely up to you.

Today, we discuss the power of you. Many thanks to Kenn Blanchard for showing me the path. His insights are cherished. Check out his NMX2014 session with the virtual ticket if you have the chance.

Here are the 8 facets of the Power of You.

 

1. Be yourself

Only you can be you

Don’t simply copy somebody else

2. Stick to your beliefs

Be true to yourself

Can’t consistently be something you’re not

Hard to fake it without tripping up

3. Tell the truth

Honesty fosters relationships

4. Use your personal style

To make your show unique, add your personal style

Do it in a way that only you can do it

5. Stories define your character

Listeners will learn about you with stories

Stories breed friendships

6. Have fun

People don’t simply want info, they want entertainment

Much more fun to learn when the content is entertaining

7. Be consistent

People know what they like and like what they know

They want to know what to expect when they listen – Deliver the goods every time

8. Be memorable

Own your category – When they think of your category, they think of you

Don’t want them to casually listen then go away

Hard to monetize your activities if you are not top-of-mind

Most marketing is focused on top-of-mind awareness and a strong call-to-action

Call-to-action is powerful when you are the first one that comes to mind

 

This week …

Review two of your shows to see if you are being yourself

Find one personal story to include in your next podcast

Do one thing in a way only you can do it and make it memorable

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create Your Podcast Brand – PTC Episode 017

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Create Your Podcast Brand

Own Your Category

Great brands own their category by consistently communicating one focused message. Think of some of the best known brands in America. The best-known soda in the world is defined by “the real thing”. Who serves more hamburgers than anyone in the world? Save 15% on your car insurance. You’re a great athlete … just do it! Coca Cola, McDonalds, Geico, and Nike all deliver focused and consistent messages and thereby become solid brands.

If you study the great brands, you will notice they stand for one specific thing. McDonald’s isn’t simply “food”. It isn’t even “fast food”. McDonalds is hamburgers. Sure, they have other items on their menu. However, they are not known for their apple pies or chocolate milk. McDonald’s is known as a hamburger joint.  (read more)

 

Hey, I’m New Here

Hey, I’m new here. What’s goin’ on?

The opening of your podcast should explain the purpose of your podcast and let your listeners know exactly what to expect as if this is the first time they have ever heard the show. This should happen on each and every show.

A well-crafted introduction serves two purposes.  (read more)

 

Create Your Own Style

Create everything you do in your own style. You can only stand out among all other shows when you create your own unique style. You must then make sure everything you do is consistent with that style.

Many new broadcasters try to emulate the style of their hero or mentor. They attempt to imitate the styles they hear from other broadcasters. Unfortunately, copying doesn’t create a unique style. Copying typically creates a watered-down version of some other style. When creating your content, be yourself and find your own style.

Some of the greatest broadcasters didn’t start the ascension to the top until they abandoned the attempts to broadcast in the style they thought others desired and began being true to themselves.  (read more)

 

Be Yourself

A great podcast is a great relationship. It is just like creating a great brand. In order to develop that solid audience relationship, you must be yourself. You can’t fake it.

When you try to be someone or something you are not, you will not sound authentic. Eventually, the truth will come out.

Have you ever met someone you had admired from afar, only to have them do something that didn’t fit with your image of them?  (read more)

 

I’d love to know hot this podcast has helped you in any way. E-mail a quick comment to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.  Your feedback helps our entire community.

Help our community grow by turning one person onto the show this week.

I’d love to help you with your show.  E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.  You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Beyond Defining Your Listener – PTC013

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Beyond Defining Your Listener

You’ve heard many times that you need to define your target listener.  What do they look like?  Who is your avatar?  Who is your ideal customer?

When most people define their target listener, they list age and gender.  If you stop their, you haven’t truly defined your listener.  Age and gender alone are pretty generic.

Defining your listener means moving beyond age and gender.  Discover what they need.  What are the hopes, dreams and fears of your target listener?  Where do they live?  What do they drive?  What is their family makeup?

In the episode this week, we discuss the many facets that make up listener definition.

Age & Gender

We begin with age and gender.  Though it is generic, we need to start with the basics.  You can find a 30-minute, deep-dive video on the differences between marketing to men and women here at PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Men and women are different.  I speak in generalities and stereotypes.  I realize these statements will not hold true in every case.  However, they are most common.

Why They Listen

Next, determine what you listener seeks.  Why do they listen to your show.  I’ll give you the first reason.  Companionship.  People do not want to be alone.  You are their friend and companion.  People have an inner need to be around other people.  You fill that role. (read more)

Make your listener feel comfortable, as if she is spending time with a friend.  When people listen to Adam Carolla, they feel like they know him.  He reveals so much about himself, you feel like you could have a beer and a conversation with him.  He fills that role.

Determine the other factors that bring your listener to your show.

Be Like You

Voyeurism is another reason people listen to the spoken word.  They want to live vicariously through the stories of others with the risk.  By telling stories, you allow your listener to experience the great things you’ve seen in life.  Your listener doesn’t need to put in the time, effort or work to get where you are in life.  They can live through your stories.

Here is a link to the worksheets that will help you go beyond age and gender when defining your target listener.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

It’s the Snap, Crackle, Pop … Not the Puffed Rice

It’s the Snap, Crackle, Pop … Not the Puffed Rice.

Rice. Sugar. Salt. Malt flavor. Mmmmm. I can’t wait to get a bowl of that!

Your listeners aren’t attracted by the contents of your show. They don’t care if your show discusses money or business or politics or sports. All your listener cares about is the benefits they will receive from your show.

Here are a few podcast descriptions I found on iTunes today.

Those people that make videos on YouTube now have their own audio podcast. Hope you will stay awhile.”

(unnamed podcast) produces original stories each week for families around the world. Each week on the (unnamed podcast), we’ll be sharing a free story from one of our original story series.”

The world’s favorite podcast about old video games reaches its next stage! Join (hosts) and a variety of guests as they discuss the favorite games and topics of yesteryear.”

I’m sure these are solid podcasts. I didn’t listen to them.  I found them all listed in the “New & Noteworthy” section. The content may be great, but the descriptions lack any snap, crackle or pop.

People get attracted to your show by the benefits, not the ingredients.

Consumers buy the fun of the Snap, Crackle & Pop. They aren’t buying the puffed rice.

Listeners are seeking the fun of learning life’s lessons through stories, not original stories for families.  Fun learning, not original stories.

The audience wants nostalgic memories of teenage afternoons wasted in the arcade in front of Donkey Kong, Ms. Pac Man and Dragon’s Lair, not discussion of your favorite games and topics. Memories, not topics.

When a listener decides to listen to your podcast, they ask, “What will this podcast do for me?” If the answer is topics and discussions, your listener is probably moving on. If it is nostalgic memories and comedic bits of “name that video game theme”, you might just entice him to check out your show.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

There is a reason the fun of the experience is on the front of the box and the ingredients are relegated to the side. You need to sell the fun.

What Is Your File? …

 

What is your file?

(photo by Kreego)

There is one file in your listener’s mind that you occupy. You can not occupy multiple files. You must pick one. Define that file and do all you can to support that image. That is the essence of your brand.

Where does McDonald’s fit in your brain file? McDonald’s is probably the “Fast Hamburgers” file. Does it also fill the “Milkshake File”? Probably not. Sure, they serve milkshakes. However, that file is probably occupied by your favorite ice cream shop.

Where would Cheetos fit in your brain file? It would go in the “Lip Balm” file, right? Of course not. However, Frito-Lay launched Cheetos Lip Balm in 2005. It failed miserably, because Cheetos occupies the “Cheesy Puffed Snack” file in your brain.

Your podcast brand can only occupy one file. You need to decided the one image you can own. Define your brand.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Do not try to be all things to all people. Pick one thing for which your brand will be known. What is your file?

Everyone will get you nowhere …

 

 

Everyone will get you nowhere.

(photo by sergge)

Don’t worry about pleasing everyone with your podcast. As the saying goes, you’ll end up pleasing no one. You will never be able to satisfy everyone. There will always be someone who doesn’t like, need or want whatever it is that you’re selling.

Instead, develop meaningful relationships with your biggest fans. Deliver great content to those who love what you do. If you keep your fans happy and coming back for more, you can leverage those relationships to create additional fans.

Apple doesn’t worry about pleasing every computer user. The company is focused on converting their users into super-fans by delivering great products. Their efforts are creating a cult brand.

In the past, Apple was a niche player in the desktop market. Their market share was small. As the company super-served its audience by expanding into music players and tablets, fans become more engaged and evangelical. Apple now#3 and owns 17% of the total PC market.

The success of Apple wasn’t achieved by selling more desktops to more people. It was achieved by creating wonderful products for their fans. Those carrying iPhones, iPads and iPods became promoters of the brand. This evangelism is the key to the success of Apple. The company didn’t worry about pleasing everyone. Apple focused on their fans.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

If you want to truly engage your audience, and create an effective call to action, don’t worry about pleasing everyone. Focus on creating relationships with your fans. Everyone will get you nowhere.

Are You Important Yet? …

Are you important yet?

(photo by tofi)

The most important marketer in a person’s life is someone they know, like and trust.

This is the primary reason word-of-mouth is so powerful. The recommendation that comes from word-of-mouth usually only comes from a friend. A friend is someone you know, like and trust.

If the recommendation comes from someone you don’t know, the message is no longer word-of-mouth. The suggestion is now called “marketing”, or “sales” or “a pitch”.

If you want the call-to-action within your podcast to be effective, you need to build that trusting relationship with your listener. From your stories will come self-revelation. This will allow your listener to get to know you. By being yourself and sincere, you will become likable. Finally, if you continually help your listener get what they want by putting their interests first, you will build trust.

On The Dave Ramsey Show, Dave helps people with every call he receives. Out of six or eight calls and e-mails he answers in an hour, he may mention his books, websites or seminars once. He will always mention his “baby steps” philosophy. However, he will rarely suggest people buy his products.

Dave reveals many personal things about his past and his family. The listener gets to know him. He is often blunt and honest. Dave’s tough love makes him likable. The help he provides his callers builds trust. These steps make Dave’s manta become a true following. His listeners spread the word to the point where The Dave Ramsey Show has around 5 million listeners.

If you have built a true friendship with your listener, where they know, like and trust you, your call-to-action will be powerful. Spend time creating that relationship between your brand and your listener. Then and only then can you effectively use word-of-mouth.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Are you important yet?

Is That You Calling? …

Is that you calling?

(photo by erwinova)

To create a successful podcast, you need to create an effective call-to-action within your show. So, how do we measure success? If we are trying to get our audience to do something by using a call-to-action (listen again, buy our product, visit our website, support our cause), our call-to-action should be our determining factor of success.

When you create your podcast, you should measure your success not by the number of listeners or downloads, but by conversions to whatever you want them to be or do.

Let’s say your goal is to get people to visit the store on your website. If you have 1,000 people listening to your show, but you only get 2 of them to act and actually visit the site, you really haven’t been successful.

However, if you only have 200 listeners, but 100 love everything you do and visit your site regularly, I would consider that a success. Having 1,000 listeners may sound better than 200. By closer evaluation, I would much rather have 100 fans than 2.

Don’t get fooled by measuring the incorrect statistic. Measure what counts. Measure your call to action.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create an effective call-to-action, and measure it. Is that you calling?

Selling Is Easy, Right? …

Selling is easy, right?

(photo by friday)

I was listening to the latest interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspire him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. The marketing and engaging relationship created with your podcast will have your audience ready to act upon your call-to-action.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Selling is easy, right?

Do They Remember? …

Do they remember?

(photo by lesscholz)

When you consider the options podcast listeners have, the importance of creating a powerful brand really becomes apparent.

I searched iTunes for podcasts about hockey. There are hundreds of hockey podcasts available. Thousands and thousands of episodes exist that deal with hockey. You can find various topics, including drills, NHL teams, coaching, fantasy hockey and many more.

How do you stand out? How do you get noticed?

Your listener needs to remember your podcast, so they can return and listen again. That is the way to build a following. It really doesn’t matter how many people listen today. What builds a strong podcast is the number of listeners that come back the next time, and the next time, and the time after that. You build your audience slowly by getting more people to listen to this episode than listened to the last episode. Get your listener to remember to return.

Using your brand to create strong relationships with your listeners is critical to the health of your podcast. If you are bland, you will get lost in the sea of average. There are over 100,000 podcasts available for consumption. Most of them are average or worse. If you refine your content, turn your information into entertainment, and transform your podcast into powerful relationships, you will easily stand out from the crowd. It is a must not only for your success, but your mere survival. Begin your brand today.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

When it comes time for your audience listening again, do they remember?

Emotionally Powerful? …

Emotionally Powerful?

(photo by hvf)

A successful podcast is built on a strong relationship with the listener. It could be called a tribe as defined by Seth Godin in his book of the same name. The strong relationships with your listeners begin to develop your brand. You can then monetize your brand and associated relationships with an effective call-to-action. But it starts with the brand.

Powerful brands are more than just recognizable names. Powerful brands are full of emotion. A brand is a collection of perceptions, creating emotional connections, while consistently delivering on a promise. The more powerful the emotional connection, the more powerful the brand.

Take a moment to think of some very powerful brands and the associated emotions of the rabid fans of those brands. Nike. Volkswagen. Star Trek. Starbucks. Apple. Harley Davidson. Fans will go out of their way to interact with their favorite brand. These brands are unique, because they create powerful emotions within their fans that are not found in ordinary brands.

Ordinary brands lack emotion. Keds. Buick. Battlestar Galactica (either one). Dunkin’ Donuts. Hewlett-Packard. Honda. The powerful emotions are not present for most people in these brands.  Even the websites of these brands lack the emotion of the powerful brands.

An amazing book entitled “The Power of Cult Branding” by Matthew W. Ragas and B. J. Bueno describes the Seven Golden Rules to cult branding. Emotion is the key to all seven. Social Groups, Courage, Fun, Human Needs, Contribution, Openness, and Freedom. All emotional, not functional. It’s not the best, biggest, brightest, loudest, or #1 product. Cult brands are focused on emotion, not hype.

If you want to turn your podcast into a powerful brand that you can monetize with a strong call-to-action, stir emotion every time.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Is your podcast emotionally powerful?

People Buy Benefits …

People buy benefits.

(photo by Studio)

Your podcast should contain some sort of call to action. You might ask the listener to visit your website. You may ask them to contribute to a cause. Selling your product is a definite possibility. Simply tuning in again is a call to action. Whatever it happens to be, the call to action is part of the relationship building process with your listener.

In your call to action, be sure to sell benefits, not features. If you are selling a cookbook, the large print, stain-free cover and fact that it will stay open are all features. The ease at which the cook can read the book at a distance, the way it will stay clean to hand down to the next generation and the time they will save with the hands-free help it provides are all benefits. People don’t buy products. They buy what the product will accomplish.

How often does Starbuck’s promote their fine coffee bean. The answer is very little. Starbuck’s spends their time creating the Starbuck’s experience. They market the way Starbuck’s makes you feel. They aren’t promoting the warmth, color and robust flavor of their coffee. They create a relationship and true experience. They sell the way the coffee experience makes you feel. It is the barista, the smell, the music, the drink names, the cup, the sleeve, and even the lid. It isn’t warm, dark caffeinated beverages.  Their story says, “Every day, we go to work hoping to do two things: share great coffee with our friends and help make the world a little better.”  Benefits, not features.

Find the true benefits of your podcast and product. Then, promote them heavily. People buy benefits.

Out Of Self-Revelation Comes Trust …

Out of self-revelation comes trust.

(photo by Vatikaki)

If you wish to have your audience/listener/customer act on your call-to-action (sales pitch, invitation, read your blog again), you must first create trust. People buy things from people they trust.

A person will only trust you if 1.) they believe you have their best interest at heart and 2.) they believe you trust them.

A relationship moves beyond acquaintance to friendship when trust is developed.

People will believe you trust them when you reveal things about yourself to them. Your revelations show you trust the other person to hear you without judgement.

If you give first, your counterpart will be more likely to give in return. If you show trust, they will eventually show trust in return.

When you tell great stories in your podcast, you begin to develop strong relationships with your listeners by revealing details about yourself and trusting your audience with those details.

Howard Stern reveals his inadequacies often on his show. Domino’s Pizza revealed their missteps in their latest ad campaign. When Oprah Winfrey revealed her personal issues and troubles, people loved her even more.

Create a trustworthy, solid, effective brand by telling great stories. Out of self-revelation comes trust.

Don’t Just Fill Time …

Don’t just fill time.

(photo by Hornpipe)

When you fill time, you waste time. Your listeners have come to your podcast, because you have made them a promise with your brand. They believe they will receive some sort of information and entertainment from your show. Your listener will only give you a few minutes to begin delivering, or they will be headed to the next podcast.

Consistently add value for your listener at every opportunity. Either make the show shorter, or prepare better. It is usually a solid rule of thumb to prepare more content than you will need. This will allow you to always deliver valuable information.

Seth Godin does a fantastic job delivering brief bits of valuable information with his blog. He even carries this through to the manifestos published by his Domino Project. Seth wastes very little time. Once he has made his point, he wraps it up.

Your listener is expecting something from your podcast. Deliver continuously on the promise of your brand. Don’t just fill time.

You’re Damaging Your Brand …

You’re damaging your brand.

(photo by Lastdays1)

Three comments doesn’t equal success.

I really wanted to scream. It is frustrating to see people blindly damage their brand. Today, I read a blog post by a gentleman who is willingly doing just that.

Recently, I wrote a blog post entitled “I think we’re lost”. I described how the two hosts spent the first 10 minutes of a 30-minute business podcast discussing the weather instead of their podcast topic. Wasting time like this damages the credibility of their show. The hosts are not delivering what any new listener would expect to receive from a business podcast.

As of today, they have received three comments on that particular show. The host has written a blog post proclaiming success with his show, because his tangent received three comments. In the past, he would typically jump right into pertinent content and receive no comments.

Lately, he has been opening the show with these tangents. He received one negative message from a listener who felt these musings before the true content were a waste of time. He feels his “new” approach is justified, because he received three positive comments on the show.

The host stated that since the prior method wasn’t receiving any comments, good or bad, this new strategy must be better. This thinking is flawed. Three comments only means three people thought it was amusing enough to comment. That’s it. It means nothing more. The fact that nobody commented on the previous shows with the direct content method also does not mean no listener found the shows entertaining or valuable. It simply means the content wasn’t special enough to elicit a comment.

This host should judge the success of his podcast by the growth and overall listenership of the show. I think if he continues with this tangent strategy, he will surely see his growth stagnate. He will also probably see the size of his audience shrink, because he is no longer living up to his brand’s promise.

If you want more comments, deliver better content that stirs emotions. Comments for the sake of getting comments really proves nothing. Sure, I love comments. However, I’ll take a growing, engaged audience over comments every time. Audience growth and engagement will move you forward.

Three comments doesn’t equal success. You’re damaging your brand.

Develop A Goal …

Develop a goal for your show.

(photo by Epixx)

As you develop your podcast, you need to determine what you hope to accomplish with the show. What will the show be about? What do you hope to make your audience feel? Is there some call to action you wish to make your listener take?

After you have developed the goal for your show, stick to it. All content on your show should support your goal.

If your goal is to help consumers get out of debt, don’t spend a lot of time discussing your favorite, new CD. Your listener has come to your show expecting you to deliver on your promise. If you tell her you help people get out of debt, deliver that content to her. When you start discussing anything other than that, your brand promise is tarnished. She will be headed elsewhere.

In Correy Webb’s “My Disney Podcast”, Correy discusses all things Disney. He discusses cruise adventures, visits to the parks and other traveling tips. If Correy suddenly began discussing the poker game he had with his buddies last weekend, you would be disappointed. Poker isn’t the reason you’re listening. His Disney promise would be broken.  You are now unsure what you will receive next time you listen.

A great brand is built slowly with strong consistency. Deliver on your brand’s promise. However, before you can deliver, you need to develop a goal for your show.

Be Yourself …

Be yourself.

A great podcast is a great relationship. It is just like creating a great brand. In order to develop that solid audience relationship, you must be yourself. You can’t fake it.

When you try to be someone or something you are not, you will not sound authentic. Eventually, the truth will come out.

Have you ever met someone you had admired from afar, only to have them do something that didn’t fit with your image of them? Maybe it was a baseball player, or a movie star, or a politician or a musician. You met them with great expectations of an encounter with your hero only to find out they were rude and average. It turned out they were only being who they thought they should be for the public when really they were someone completely different in real life.

Everyone has their flaws. That is what makes them human. Howard Stern has flaws. He makes his flaws part of his radio show. Domino’s Pizza admitted the errors of their ways with their cheap, low quality pizza. They laid it out for the world to see in their marketing. Your listener will accept your flaws. They will feel like you are “one of them” when you admit to your flaws upfront. Don’t be afraid to expose yourself.

When your listener discovers you are something other than the character you portray, the bond of trust will be demolished. Your relationship will be forever damaged.

Build a solid brand. Be yourself.

Creating Theater Of The Mind …

 

Create theater of the mind.

The use of active language will stir the imagination of your listener and help you connect to your audience. Put the listener in the moment. Make the listener see the action you are describing.

“I’m walking into the bustling restaurant and shaking off the evening cold without even watching where I’m shuffling.” That is active language. In your mind, you can see me walking in.

Sure, your restaurant may be different from my restaurant. That difference is what makes theater of the mind great. You see it the way you think it fits best for you. Your scene doesn’t need to match my scene in order for the story to make sense. It is your theater.

Active language connects each listener to the story in his or her own way. It will create strong audience engagement.  Active language during storytelling is a powerful tool you can use while you’re building your podcast.

Create a great podcast brand. Create theater of the mind.

I would love to stay connected with you.  Follow my blog by clicking the “follow” button on this page.


Be Consistent …

Be consistent

To create a solid brand, you need to be consistent. Consistent with your message. Consistent with your promise. Consistent with your image.

When you think of great brands like McDonald’s, Coca Cola and Nike, you can see the evidence of solid consistency. When you walk into McDonald’s, you know exactly what you will get. You’ll get inexpensive hamburgers fast. It doesn’t matter if it is a McDonald’s in Missoula, Montana or Mexico City, Mexico. The brand will be the same. You may experience some small differences in the menu. For the most part, you’ll still get hamburgers, french fries and a Coke. And of course the Big Mac. If you head into a McDonald’s and suddenly find fish n chips or bratwurst as the main entrée, your trust in the brand will be destroyed. You won’t be sure what you’ll get next time you visit.

Your podcast must be just as consistent in order to create a great brand. Your listener must know exactly what they will get each time they listen. They come to your show to receive your promise. Deliver every time. Deliver consistently.

Consistency doesn’t mean lack of variety. It simply means that you always deliver your promise, on your mission statement. McDonald’s offers different sizes. They offer chicken and fish sandwiches. You can get McNuggets. Whichever way, it is always inexpensive food fast when you want it. And the burgers are always there.

You are creating a brand when you are creating your podcast. You need to deliver consistently each time your listener tunes into the show. Foster that strong relationship with your audience. Be consistent.

Trust Can Be Monetized

Trust can be monetized.

Structure is necessary for your podcast in order to build consistency and trust with your fans. The audience expects specific elements each time they listen to your show. They expect your style to be consistent. Your audience expects the host to be the same for each show. You must deliver to that expectation to build trust with your fans. This trust is where podcast monetization begins.

Think of McDonald’s. When you order a Big Mac at McDonald’s, you expect it to taste exactly like the last Big Mac you purchased and ate. That is true whether you purchased your last Big Mac at the same restaurant, across town, in another state or around the world. You expect it to be consistent. If the Big Mac you purchased today suddenly has mustard and sauerkraut on it, you would be a little hesitant to purchase another next time. You know what you want and want what you know. You want consistency.

Your audience desires the same consistency from your podcast. The consistency gained from the show structure helps the audience feel at ease and comfortable with the program. If your listener is new, she is brought up to speed quickly when you tell her what to expect. If the listener is a returning participant, your introduction causes him to say to himself, “Oh, yeah. Exactly how I remember it. This is the right show.”

If you are watching the news and suddenly there are two new anchors along with different people doing the weather and sports, you will wonder if you’ve somehow stumbled upon the wrong channel. It will feel uncomfortable. It isn’t what you expected.

Consistency helps your audience feel at home. Work to achieve it every time. Consistent structure builds trust. Trust can be monetized.

Own Your Category

Great brands own their category by consistently communicating one focused message.  Think of some of the best known brands in America.  The best-known soda in the world is defined by “the real thing”.  Who serves more hamburgers than anyone in the world?  Save 15% on your car insurance.  You’re a great athlete … just do it!  Coca Cola, McDonalds, Geico, and Nike all deliver focused and consistent messages and thereby become solid brands.

If you study the great brands, you will notice they stand for one specific thing. McDonald’s isn’t simply “food”. It isn’t even “fast food”. McDonalds is hamburgers. Sure, they have other items on their menu. However, they are not known for their apple pies or chocolate milk. McDonald’s is known as a hamburger joint.

When you begin to define your brand and strategy, be specific. What is the one thing for which you will be known? What is the one thing that will make you stand out and be remembered? You can ask yourself, “When people think of my brand, they think of _____.” It will be very difficult to become a memorable brand if you fill in that blank with some generic term like computers or cars or health.

Be specific, be focused, be consistent and own your brand.