Tag Archives: review

REACH YOUR GOALS WITH YOUR PODCAST REVIEW – EPISODE 157

Play

REACH YOUR GOALS WITH YOUR PODCAST REVIEW – EPISODE 157

Copyright: niroworld / 123RF Stock Photo

Do you spend time each week reviewing your own show? The best way to improve is to check the results of your work with a podcast review. Know where to look, ask the right questions, and develop a plan. If you want to get better, it takes work.

REVIEW IT

Dave Jackson and I do the the Podcast Review Show together. This is a show where we invite a podcaster to join us for a podcast review. Dave has over 20 years of experience teaching. He has been podcasting since 2005. I have over 20 years experience coaching broadcasting talent. Together, we help podcasters reach their goals.

On one particular episode, Dave mentioned he was reviewing his own episode and discovered something he could do to make his show better. Dave has been doing this for a dozen years and is still discovering ways to make his show better.

I have coached broadcasters for the past 25 years. Some of these broadcasters have been in the business for 40 years. The best in any industry use coaches to improve. That is why they are the best.

Using my radio knowledge and experience, I began coaching podcasters.

REAL TIME

I’m a big proponent of podcast reviews in real time in order to get better. One of my free worksheets at PodcastTalentCoach.com is dedicated to reviewing your show. It is called the Podcast Review Worksheet. You can find it for free in the Worksheet Library.

If you want to review your own show to improve, download the worksheet for free and put it to use. This worksheet will help you know where to look and what questions to ask to improve.

The key is to review your show on a regular basis. Actually listen like a listener. That is the only way to improve.

Many hosts finish recording a show and think, “That was pretty good. What’s next?” There isn’t much time spent actually reviewing a show. There are so many other duties to handle, such as editing, posting, and promoting the show.

The strongest path to improvement is spending quality time listening to the show.

TAKE NOTES

Play it back. Grab a pad of paper and write down the parts that jump out at you. Jot down the “oh wow” moments. Take note of the sections that didn’t work exactly as you planned.

You will only find these moments when you listen like a listener.

The show will sound much different to you when you listen back than it did as you were recording it. You will hear things you didn’t notice as you were focused on creating the content. Words that you overuse will suddenly become noticeable to you.

Allow time between recording and reviewing allows you to forget excuses.

Once you have created the lists of good and not-so-good, create two more lists.

First, determine how can you create more of the “oh wow” moments on the show. How might you incorporate into the show more of the great content that worked?

Next, make a list of ways you can eliminate the parts that weren’t polished enough.

Get on the road to show improvement. Use a podcast review with your show on a regular basis.

WORKSHEET

Here are the questions on the Podcast Talent Coach Podcast Review worksheet that can help you improve your podcast.

Pick an episode from a few weeks back. Listen to it in real time. Then, ask yourself these questions.

  • What did you hope to accomplish on this show?
  • Did you succeed?
  • How did you make the audience care?
  • Where were the “oh wow” moments?
  • Where were the surprises?
  • What were the powerful words you used?
  • What did you like about the show?
  • What was memorable about the show?
  • What worked?
  • What could have been better?
  • How did you position the story from the listener’s point of view?
  • How did you include the listener, making them part of the story?
  • At what points did you introduce and reset the show/topic?
  • How did it appear you were prepared for every element?
  • What did you reveal about yourself to help foster the relationship with the audience?
  • What stories did you tell?
  • What details did you use that were spectacular and visual?
  • Where did you use active language? (walking instead of walked, eating, not ate)
  • What crutches do you use that need to be removed?
  • What is your plan to make tomorrow better?

GOOD COACH

A good coach can help you objectively review your show.

There are many myths about coaching.
Myth: I know what I am supposed to do, so I can do it myself.
Truth: Your coach can see things you cannot.

The best in any industry use coaches. There are business coaches, quarterback coaches, vocal coaches, violin coaches, writing coaches, speaking coaches and many others.

Coaches are everywhere. Unless you are in a particular industry, most people have never heard of these coaches. These instructors are well educated and experienced in the profession. They help the greats become even better.

Check out “Why Pay For Feedback – Episode 068” for an in depth look.

Coaches will hear things you do not. They are not too close to the content and can be objective. They don’t have the excuses.

Coaches also bring a different perspective and different experiences to your podcast review.

A good coach should also help you recognize the strong parts of your content. Your coach should give you confidence to take chances and hold you accountable to review your show.

You can be a guest on the Podcast Review Show with Dave Jackson and me. See how coaching works. Hire me for one-on-one coaching to help you improve. Or simply use the worksheet and give it a try for yourself. Either way, I would suggest you listen to the Feedback episode.

Why Pay For Feedback – Episode 068

Next week: how to promote your podcast without being obnoxious.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Do It Yourself Podcast Critique – Episode 133

Play

Do It Yourself Podcast Critique – Episode 133

Copyright: dskdesign / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: dskdesign / 123RF Stock Photo

Do you fear sounding like a beginner? Do you have a desire to have stronger content?

On this episode, I want to help you learn to review and critique your own podcast in order to make your content stronger.

Reviewing your content on a regular basis is critical to your improvement. Learning how to critique yourself will help you sound more prepared, more organized and more like a true, professional broadcaster.

When I was beginning my broadcasting career, I feared people would see me as someone simply trying to play the part of a professional. I didn’t have any idea what I was doing, let alone how to get better.

I wanted to have more credibility. How could I get there? Over 20 years, I learned to review and critique my own show through coaches, consultants, articles, conferences and mentors.

My broadcasting career began while I was in college studying for my architecture degree. What started as something fun to make college money suddenly turned into a career.

Here I was, a college kid studying architecture, trying to pretend I was a professional broadcaster.

I had no idea what I was doing. It was all trial and error.

Now, 25 years later, I am trying to help podcasters avoid the growing pains I suffered learning by diving head first into the deep end and quickly figuring out how to swim.

Over the years, the mistakes I made were plenty. In radio, on-air talent learn to be better through a process called the aircheck session. These are some of the most painful meetings you could have if the coach doesn’t have a teacher’s heart.

My aircheck sessions were typically run by my Program Director of the radio station. I would bring a recording of my show. We would listen to the show together. Then, my Program Director would tell me everything I’m doing wrong.

Over the next week, I would try to improve. We would go through the entire process the following week.

Once I was able to find a Program Director who had my interests at heart, we began working on my strengths. We would find the area that were strong and try to do more of that.

This became a much more enjoyable process. Over the years, I learned to recognize those strengths myself. My show continuously got stronger. I was then able to critique myself on a regular basis.

By sharing my scars and battle wounds, along with the processes, tips and skills I have learned over the years, I can help you fast track the road to great podcasting.

Over the past 20 years, I have been coaching radio talent with their shows. I have helped many radio shows reach the top of the ratings. My show has also been at the top for years.

This success is built on a quality review and critique of each show. When you learn to recognize the powerful parts of your episode, the will naturally become part of your content over time.

I have developed a Show Review Worksheet to help you review your show. You can download the worksheet for free.

This tool is one of nine worksheets included in the Podcast Talent Coach Workbook. The book includes complete explanations and instructions for each worksheet. You can get the workbook in a paperback or Kindle version.

Here are the questions included on the Podcast Talent Coach Show Review Worksheet. These questions will help you review and refine your show.

QUESTIONS

What did you hope to accomplish on this show? Did you succeed?

Part of your show prep should have included a goal and focus for the episode. We walked through that in the episode about show prep. Did you accomplish that goal?

To create more engagement with your listeners, your show needs to take the next step. Where do you take your content from here? How do you continue the conversation? Did you succeed?

How did you make the audience care?

Engagement is created when you stir emotion. Why is much more powerful than how. How did you make them care during this episode?

Where were the “oh wow” moments?

You do not need to make your entire show amazing. You simply need a few memorable spots. Create a couple moments to make your listener say “oh wow”. This is how you get your listeners to share your content. Find the “oh wow” moments in your episode.

Where were the surprises?

Surprise and delight. That will keep listeners returning week after week. Surprise will bring a smile to your listener’s face. This is where your information becomes entertainment. Where were your surprises?

What were the powerful words you used?

Words are powerful when you make the right choice. Selecting smart words help draw pictures in the mind of your listener. Thick and lush evoke two different emotions. Sad and devastated spark two different visions. Find the words in your episode that jump out of the speakers.

What did you like about the show?

When you are interested, you are interesting. What parts impressed you?

What was memorable about the show?

Find the one thing that people will remember. Your listener will not remember the entire show. What is your one thing?

What worked?

Did you try something new in this episode? Did it work? Push yourself to create new content in every episode. Then evaluate that content to see if it was a success.

What could have been better?

This is the other end of the previous questions. Where can you improve?

How did you position the story from the listener’s point of view?

We often talk about “what’s in it for me”. Did you position your content from your listener’s point of view?

How did you include the listener, making them part of the story?

Great marketing is more like a mirror. Reflect the life of your listener. Make them forget they are listening to a podcast by putting them in the story. Where did you include your listener?

At what points did you introduce and reset the show/topic?

Resetting the show topic is important to maintain the flow of the show. If the theme of the show is improvement, and you have a few different topics that support that theme, reset before each topic. Help support the overall concept by reintroducing the theme that ties it all together. Where was that apparent in the show?

How did it appear you were prepared for every element?

Keep your notes close as you record your content. We discussed this in the episode about show prep. Did you sound prepared with every piece of information you presented?

What did you reveal about yourself to help foster the relationship with the audience?

We talk about doing business with those we know, like and trust. Where did you reveal things to allow your listeners to begin to know you?

What stories did you tell?

Stories are the best way to allow listeners to get to know you. When you tell stories, you reveal your thoughts, beliefs and values. Find the stories in your episode. Learn to recognize when stories can be included.

What details did you use that were spectacular and visual?

Details help stories come to life. Specifics make the story more believable. This is similar to powerful language. Where did you use vivid details?

Where did you use active language? (walking instead of walked, eating, not ate)

Listeners can see active language. You can see “walking”. It is difficult to see “walked”. If you want your content to come to life in the theater of the mind, use active language. Find some in your episode.

What crutches do you use that need to be removed?

Crutches are words you use too often to fill time. These are typically phrases you use when you cannot think of anything else to say. Where do you hear crutches in your episode?

What is your plan to make tomorrow better?

Find three things in the 19 questions that you can work on this week.
Do you find yourself struggling to find time to create your podcast every week? Next week, I am going to walk you through step-by-step on how I create my content.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Critical Piece To A Great Podcast – Episode 123

Play

The Critical Piece To A Great Podcast – Episode 123

Podcast Review Show

On a recent episode of the Podcast Review Show that I do with Dave Jackson, we got into a discussion with a podcaster who struggles with the introduction of his show. This happens with so many hosts. How do you properly begin an episode? Why are the important elements of a solid introduction? What is the purpose?

We were talking with Doug Salamone of Mind Drippings podcast. On this particular episode, Doug was interviewing Taylor Pearson, author of “The End Of Jobs”. Doug said he was having trouble forming the introduction of his interviews.

START WITH WHY

Here is Doug’s first question: “Taylor, why don’t you introduce yourself a little bit more, and start off at the beginning with what brought you to decide to write this book and I’ll just let you roll with it and we’ll get the questions going.”

Doug needs to make us care about the author as he introduces him BEFORE he brings Taylor on the show. Then, Doug needs to make us care about the subject.

Before you begin your show, determine what are you hoping people will take from the interview. What is the point.

When you use, “Tell us about yourself”, it sounds like you didn’t do your homework.

The show is about big ideas. What is the big idea in this episode? The world of jobs is coming to an end. Start there.

Later in the interview, Doug asks, “What are people to do … if the opportunities are limited … and every single year we have thousands upon thousands of people graduating from universities across the country … what are people to do to protect themselves from becoming obsolete in this current economy that we’re seeing everyday increasing where jobs are being eliminated or being exported to countries across the world?”

This is the essence of the conversation. Let’s start here.

Many introductions are a waste of time. They host wanders into the episode rather than creating anticipation and setting up the content.

“Tell us a little about yourself, who you are and what you do.” It is such an overused first questions.

Do your homework. Know the important facts about your guest that support the topic. Provide those pieces of information right at the beginning. Then, hit the ground running with great questions.

Make the introduction of your show compelling. It should make your audience want to stick around for the payoff. I hear so many shows begin with their standard show open immediately followed by a bunch of housekeeping. Don’t waste the time of your audience. Your introduction should make a promise (tell the audience what to expect). You should then follow through on that promise (give them the content they expect).

When a show begins with, “I’ll show you how to make a million dollars in 4 easy-to-understand steps”, followed by, “But first, let me plug 14 things and chat a bit about why I didn’t post an episode last week”, you are losing your audience. Your fan tuned in to hear your secrets, not your problems.

If you have housekeeping notes to pass along, sprinkle them within the show throughout the content. Lead with your strongest material. Housekeeping is not it.

Your introduction should set up your podcast. It should be an intriguing introduction that tells the listener exactly what the podcast is all about. What will I get when I listen? It doesn’t matter whether your podcast is 10 minutes or 60 minutes long. You need to tell the listener what is to come.

“Welcome to Podcast Talent Coach Podcast. My name is Erik K. Johnson. This is where we help you transforming your information into engaging entertainment so we can turn your podcast into powerful, profitable relationships.”

With that quick introduction, I told you exactly what to expect. You know the name of my podcast. You know the name of the host. You know the goal we are setting out to accomplish. I’ve also put you in the mix by referencing your dreams and how my podcast will help you. In those brief seconds, I’ve given you who, what, when and why.

That content should be followed immediately by a creative tease of this particular show. It might be something like, “We will help Steve figure out how to gently end a bad interview. Shelly asks about incorporating a call-to-action without making the show sound like an infomercial. And finally, we will hear a clip for the ‘The Golden Garden’ podcast and help Chris increase the energy and forward momentum in the show. Let’s get to it. First up …” This goes right into the show content. We start delivering on the promise made in the introduction. The show is moving forward.

If I said, “Before we get to it, let me explain the new look of my website”, I would only be relevant to a small portion of my audience. Who cares about my new layout? That would assume first that most of my audience has visited my website prior to this show, and second that they can’t find their own way around the new layout. That’s a pretty big assumption. If is important enough to include, put it at the end, or somehow incorporate the information into an answer.

Don’t waste the time of your audience. Make your introduction intriguing and get to the content immediately.

MAKE THEM CARE

I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase “what’s in it for me?”

Your audience will be asking this very question every time they tune into your podcast. Your introduction better tell your listener exactly how your topic will affect them. You need to hook them right at the beginning with an intriguing introduction. If you don’t hook them early, they will be gone in search of something more captivating.

When your audience knows what is in it for them, they begin to care. Making your listener care is the only way to get them to listen and more importantly come back again.

Lead with an intriguing introduction.

This is true for your podcast in general as well as each individual topic. Your intriguing introduction should hook your audience, let them know exactly what to expect, and allow them to enjoy the story.

What do you hope your audience will take away from this particular discussion? Your introduction should spell it out. It should set up what is to come.

If your goal is to make your listener laugh at your misfortune over the weekend, lead with it. “This weekend was so disastrous, I wouldn’t have had time for anything else to go wrong even if I tried.” The audience will now have time to enjoy the vivid details of your horrible weekend rather than trying to figure out what point you are trying to make.

When you begin your story with the details, your listener spends energy trying to determine the point you are trying to make. They are trying to figure out what the story is about.

Have you ever been stuck listening to someone tell a story while you’re thinking, “Will he ever get to the point?” That is what we are trying to avoid.

Here is an example of a story you might hear. “This weekend we went to the mall. It was just the two of us. We were looking for a gift for my dad.” Are we telling a story about finding gifts? Is this story just recapping the weekend? Maybe it is about my dad. You don’t know. I haven’t told you. There is no lead to this story.

To hook your audience and allow them to truly enjoy the story, lead with an intriguing introduction.

EMOTIONALLY POWERFUL?

A successful podcast is built on a strong relationship with the listener. It could be called a tribe as defined by Seth Godin in his book of the same name. The strong relationships with your listeners begin to develop your brand. You can then monetize your brand and associated relationships with an effective call-to-action. But it starts with the brand.

Powerful brands are more than just recognizable names. Powerful brands are full of emotion. A brand is a collection of perceptions, creating emotional connections, while consistently delivering on a promise. The more powerful the emotional connection, the more powerful the brand.

Take a moment to think of some very powerful brands and the associated emotions of the rabid fans of those brands. Nike. Volkswagen. Star Trek. Starbucks. Apple. Harley Davidson. Fans will go out of their way to interact with their favorite brand. These brands are unique, because they create powerful emotions within their fans that are not found in ordinary brands.

Ordinary brands lack emotion. Keds. Buick. Battlestar Galactica. Dunkin’ Donuts. Hewlett Packard. Honda. The powerful emotions are not present for most people in these brands.

An amazing book entitled “The Power of Cult Branding” by Matthew W. Ragas and B. J. Bueno describes the seven golden rules to cult branding. Emotion is the key to all seven. Social Groups, Courage, Fun, Human Needs, Contribution, Openness, and Freedom. All emotional. None are functional. It’s not the best, biggest, brightest, loudest, or #1 product. Cult brands are focused on emotion, not hype.

If you want to turn your podcast into a powerful brand that you can monetize with a strong call-to-action, stir emotion every time.

Next week, we will walk through the steps in creating a powerful introduction. I’ll give you a step-by-step process.
Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Review Your Podcast For Success

Play

Review Your Podcast For Success

If you hope to improve your show episode after episode, you need to properly review your show each and every time.  To improve, you must look for the correct things.  You also need to listen as a fan and not simply as a podcast producer.  Below is a list of questions to help you effectively review your podcast.  Let me know how I can help.

1. Review Your Show

Review your show on a regular basis. Actually listen like a listener. That is the only way to improve.

Many hosts finish recording a show and think, “That was pretty good. What’s next?” They might recreate parts of the show in their head to determine what might make the show better next time. Usually, there isn’t much time spent actually reviewing a show. There are so many other duties to handle. It’s on to the next thing, which is probably editing, posting, and promoting the show.

In order to make your podcast better, you need to spend quality time listening to the show. Play it back. Grab a pad of paper and write down the parts that jump out at you. Jot down the “oh wow” moments. Take note of the sections that didn’t work exactly as you planned. (read more)

2. Is That The Right Measurement

Many podcasters and bloggers measure their success by the number of downloads of, or visits to, their material. Unless you are blogging or podcasting simply as a hobby, this is a mistake. Downloads and visits really don’t move the needle for you. They don’t generate revenue or move your product.

You need to figure out what you want your audience to do and how you measure it? What is your call-to-action? Maybe you want them to visit your website. Maybe you want them to buy your product. Maybe you want them to donate to your cause. Determine the call-to-action. (read more)

3. Think Like A Fan

There will always be new people joining your podcast. Never take your audience for granted. Never act like you have been there and done that. Your listener is still enamored by your celebrity status and ability to do what you do. Be humble. Be real. Be just as amazed as your listener is by the things you get to see and do.

Help your new listener get up to speed with your podcast. Inside jokes only make your new listener feel like they are not part of the group. You want your podcast to feel inclusive. If a new listener feels like they are being left out of the inside jokes, they will leave quickly. Your listener will feel unwelcome. Nothing will keep them around if they feel left out. (read more)

4. Questions For Review

At Podcast Talent Coach, we take great care to help our clients develop the “art” of podcasting.

Do you fear sounding like a beginner? Do you desire to have stronger content? Do you wish you could sound more prepared, more organized and more like a true, professional broadcaster?

Do you fear people will see you as someone simply trying to play the part of a professional?

Our FREE worksheets will help you develop your target listener, create a focus for your show, develop topics and stories, prepare for each show you record and properly critique your podcast to make it stronger.

Find the worksheets by clicking here.

 

This podcast is created to help you with the ART of podcasting. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment. I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Show Prep & Review – 004

Play

This podcast is created to help you with the ART of podcasting. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment. I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

In this episode, we cover 5 things …

1. How to properly prepare for your show

2. Is rehearsal really the enemy of spontaneity?

3. Lose the script

4. Review to improve

5. Coaching