Tag Archives: monetize

Are You Moving Your Podcast Forward In 2017 – Episode 159

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Are You Moving Your Podcast Forward In 2017 (Goals) – Episode 159

Achieving your goals in 2017.
Copyright: nexusplexus / 123RF Stock Photo

Where is your podcast going this year? We are one-third through the year. Are you moving forward in 2017? Have you reviewed your goals lately? Have you even set goals for this year?

We often set goals at the beginning of the year. Studies show that most goals and resolutions go by the wayside by mid-February. How are you doing with your goals?

We need to take time to review our goals often. You do not need to wait for the beginning of the year to set those goals.

WHAT IS A GOAL?

A goal is a dream with a deadline. What are your dreams for this year? If you don’t have a map and destination, you’ll only wander. You’ll never get anywhere. Let’s be specific and set some deadlines.

I am a member of Digital Marketer with Ryan Deiss. Though I am not an affiliate, he has some great products and plans. One of them I use regularly is his “60-Second Blog Plan”. This plan helps me lay out a clear path and plan for my content for the year.

Find it here:

What is the one big thing you want to accomplish over the next year? Let’s develop little steps to get there. Break the big goal into bite-sized pieces.

GOALS MUST BE SPECIFIC

If you create a weekly show, you have 52 shows over the next 12 months. It may sound like a lot. However, you need to be intentional to reach your goals.

What is your call to action within your podcast? How can we make that call-to-action more effective? Where are you sending your listener each episode to get more info? Be specific and write it down.

Are you monetizing your podcast? There are many possibilities, such as books, speaking engagements, seminars, affiliates, products and more. If you have yet to monetize your podcast, schedule your time to create something powerful. Be sure to include deadlines.

Do you interview guests on your show? Create a list of guests you’d like to get on the show. Be brave and reach out to those people. Let’s get them on the show. Give yourself a goal with a deadline.

GOALS NEED PLANS

Are you effectively planning each show before you begin? Sometimes it is difficult to get motivated to record your show on a regular basis. Plan ahead.

Download the Podcast Talent Coach Show Planning Worksheet:

When you lack motivation, revert to plan you’ve already created.

Are you reviewing your show on a regular basis? To get better, you need to look at game tape. All great sports teams review tape of previous games. You should do the same.

Get the Podcast Talent Coach Show Review Worksheet:

GOALS NEED ACCOUNTABILITY

Finding someone that can help you honestly review your show will help as well.

The next year can be huge for you if you plan. Set deadlines to turn your dreams into goals. Be sure to find balance in all areas of your life.

Take some chances. Go for the big interview or launch a product. Dream big. You might just reach your dreams.

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

9 Uncommon Books That Shaped My Podcast – Episode 120

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9 Uncommon Books That Shaped My Podcast – Episode 120

9 UNCOMMON BOOKS

We are all looking for great books and inspiration. In the online business space, the same books are often recommended and discussed. Godin. Ries & Trout. Think & Grow Rich. Those are the must-reads to be in the game.

Lesser known books can often offer powerful information and inspiration. They can also help you stand out from the crowd.

When I started in radio 25 years ago, I would read all I could about radio and business. I read the big books of the industry to keep up with the crowd. Those books were the center of many discussions at industry gatherings.

After I began programming my first radio station in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1995, I quickly realized keeping up with the crowd wasn’t going to put me ahead of the crowd.

To win, we need to think differently. To get ahead, we need to be willing to do what others will not. Find motivation and inspiration where others haven’t looked.

As you are trying to create a podcast that is unique and entertaining, one that will stand out and attract a following, take a chance on a few new ideas. Find a few nuggets that keep your heart pumping. Be a champion for a different way of thinking.

Here are few books that have inspired me. These books are not the typical fare you hear mentioned in every keynote speech. You won’t find these titles at the center of cocktail party discussions … unless you make it so.

However, these books have useful information you can put to work in your podcast and online business today. You can use these ideas to spark your creativity.

Find one book that looks exciting and inspiring to you. Give it a read. Maybe you’ll find your own wonderful spark of an idea.

THE POWER OF CULT BRANDING – HOW 9 MAGNETIC BRANDS TURNED CUSTOMERS INTO LOYAL FOLLOWERS (AND YOURS CAN, TOO!) – BJ Bueno and Matthew Ragas

This book covers the 7 rules of cult branding. As examples, the book explores the success of brands like Star Trek, Oprah Winfrey, Apple, Jimmy Buffett and Linux.

I love this book, because it explains the characteristics of brands that truly stand out from the crowd. These brands have created cult-like followings. The book gets me excited about what is possible.

PLATFORM – GET NOTICED IN A NOISY WORLD – Michael Hyatt

Michael Hyatt has a successful blog, podcast and membership site. In this book, he explores how to create a leverage your platform.

If you are in online business, this is a great read. I find another takeaway each time I read the book. This work is like a “how to” guide.

BEYOND POWERFUL RADIO – Valerie Gellar

Valerie dives into the characteristics of successful radio. These principles can also be applied to podcasting. From Valerie, I learned to never be boring. She says, “There is no such thing as too long, only too boring.”

THE MILLIONAIRE MESSENGER – MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND A FORTUNE SHARING YOUR ADVICE – Brendon Burchard

This book provides the steps to take to create your business. The process begins with selecting your area of expertise and ends with finding promotional partners and repeating the process.

It is an easy read. The book is the foundation of Brendon’s teachings. His work has really shaped my online approach.

MILLION DOLLAR COACHING – BUILD A WORLD-CLASS PRACTICE BY HELPIING OTHERS SUCCEED – Alan Weiss

If you coach, this book will help you build your process of finding clients.

This book was first recommended by Dan Miller of 48Days.com. Alan provides a great process to finding clients, converting leads and turning your coaching into a real business.

CIGARS, WHISKEY & WINNING – LEADERSHIP LESSONS FROM GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT – Al Kaltman

This book is full of great tips on management, overcoming obstacles, focus and competition. The lessons come from the actual events in the life of Ulysses S. Grant. It is an incredibly inspirational read.

THE KNACK – HOW STREET-SMART ENTREPRENEURS LEARN TO HANDLE WHATEVER COMES UP – Norm Brodsky and Bo Burlingham

This book discusses why start-ups fail, how to make sales and how to keep customers. Norm created a few businesses in New York City. He was also a contributor to INC. magazine. The lessons in the book come from his real-world experience and not simply theory.

THE E-MYTH REVISITED – WHY MOST SMALL BUSINESSES DON’T WORK AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT – Michael E. Gerber

This is probably the most popular book on this list. For the small business owner, this is a must-read. Learn to work on your business and not simply in your business. The lesson is fundamental for small business success.

CASH IN A FLASH – REAL MONEY IN NO TIME – Mark Victor Hansen and Robert G. Allen

This book shows you how to think differently to create quick cash, and then turn that cash into more cash. The lessons require action and courage. The book is creative in its storytelling.

 

I hope these books give you a bit of inspiration as you continue to grow your business. There should be at least one piece to spark some creativity for you.

Let me know what one you use. E-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Case Study: How To Set Your Price – Episode 119

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Case Study: How To Set Your Price – Episode 119

 

Set Your Price

If you are like me, and many others in the online space, you struggle with pricing. You don’t want it to be too low and leave money on the table. On the other hand, you don’t want it to be too high and not make any sales.

So, where do you set the price?

Pricing is tricky. There is a lot of art to setting your price. Most is trial and error.

There really is no “correct” price. Price is determined by supply and demand. The price of anything is that point where a seller is willing and able to sell AND a buyer is willing and able to buy. It is a continuum.

If a seller is not making much money on a sale, she will focus on another area of business that is creating more profit. If she is a public speaker on self defense and earns $2,500 per speaking opportunity on the weekends, she is creating decent income.

If she then creates an online course teaching other women self-defense and creates sales of $3,000 per week with an hour of work online marketing the course, she may opt to do less speaking and more work online.

Her speaking gigs require her to find clients, travel to the location, give the presentation for an hour or two (depending on dinner and other presentations), possibly spend the night, travel home and miss time with her family. That is a lot to give up in order to make $2,500 when an hour a night on her schedule could earn $500 more.

People may be willing and able to buy her speaking at$2,500. However, she may not be willing to sell it for that. She may do a few speeches. It may just be less frequent. If her price increases to $5,000, the decision may be different.

HOW DO YOU DECIDE?

When I began coaching podcasters, I came to that very problem. I was in that place so many entrepreneurs find themselves. A price needed to be set for my services.

What would podcasters be willing and able to pay that I would be willing to accept?

In this episode, I take you step-by-step through the process I took to set the pricing for my podcast coaching.

So, how do you set your price.

OVERVIEW

First, ask your customers what they will buy. This could be a survey of your list. You could simply study the market and determine what they are already buying. Find a few people that could use your help and ask five or ten of them.

Next, determine what problem you are solving for your audience. People buy benefits and solutions. People don’t buy mops. They buy clean floors. Solve a problem they know they have.

Then, price on value. Know what value you have to offer. Your experience, knowledge and ability all play into your value. This will determine why it should be you rather than anyone else.

You can now set a price by looking at the market and seeing what they charge. Buy a few similar products to see what is included if necessary. You want your price to be competitive, but not necessarily the cheapest.

Your price does not need to be less than everyone else. It should probably be more expensive than others in order to stand out. Make it a great value for the price to justify being at the top end.

If you tell your audience what to do, you can charge a low price. If you teach them how to do, you are able to set a mid-level price. When you do it for the, you can be at the high end.

To be at the top of the range, go all out and solve all of their problems. Be a full-service machine. Prove the value and then add a bit more.

Most importantly, have a sales process. Know how you will attract people to your process. Define how you will demonstrate your value and benefits. Give your audience a ton of value, then the opportunity to buy.

I am not guaranteeing you will make money. I am not promising you that you will get rich, or even make a dime for that matter. I do not know you or your abilities.

I am saying this process worked for me. You may find a few helpful tips here that could help you in some way.

If you show your visitors the value of your product or service while giving them more than they expected, there is a good chance they will buy.

As in my example, there are times when the price doesn’t make sense. This is when you need to review your process.

Is the issue the price tag as it was with my program at the beginning?

Does the roadblock appear due to the structure of the product or service as it did with my 12-week program rather than weekly calls?

Are your clients looking for a product or service tailored to their needs, like my calls ever other week?

Rather than launching your product to thousands of people at one time, launch to a few. See if they are interested at that price and value. Gather some feedback. Make adjustments. Launch again to a few more people.

As you adjust your sales process, you will find a spot where clients are willing and able to buy your product at a price you are willing and able to sell. If you are not selling enough, add more value or lower the price. If you are selling too much, raise the price.

Tinker until it feels right. There is no correct price. There is only a price with which you are comfortable and that pleases your audience.

See the info page for my coaching services HERE:

PODCAST TALENT COACH COACHING

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

How Radio And Podcasting Are The Same – Episode 118

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How Radio And Podcasting Are The Same – Episode 118

The podcast “elite” will sometimes say, “This isn’t radio, this is podcasting. It’s different here.”

Well, I have news for you. Podcasting and radio are more alike than some will admit. You could benefit a bit by recognizing the similarities and borrowing the best practices.

There are many ways that radio and podcasting are the same.

The Same …

1. Same Tools

Both create with audio equipment.

This one is pretty obvious. Both are creating shows using a mic and other audio equipment.

The different ways the equipment is used makes it art. One sculptor may work with wood when another works with rock. Both are still sculptors and artists.

2. Same Approach

Both sit in a room alone trying to entertain people they cannot see.

It sounds crazy when you say it out loud. Both podcasters and broadcasters sit alone in a room talking with people they can neither see nor hear. Both try to predict the reaction of the listener while creating the entertainment.

3. Same Conversation

Both have real conversations with the listener.

Being authentic is critical to success of both podcasters and listeners. Both try to build knowledge and trust with the audience in order to develop a relationship.

4. Same Visions

Both create images in the mind of the listener.

When you tell great stories, your listener gets to know you. This is part of the “know, like and trust” philosophy of doing business.

Stories with vivid details allow the listener to develop images in the theater of the mind. These stories allow her to enjoy the story in her own way.

5. Same Experience

Both are individual activities.

When two people watch the same video, little is left to the imagination. When the same two people hear audio, each will develop individual images in their mind.

No two images will be identical. Listening is an individual activity.

6. Same Connection

Both try to make a one-on-one connection and create a following.

The podcaster and broadcaster are both trying to create a tribe for their content. If you are not trying to grow your audience, you will eventually be talking to yourself.

7. Same Episodes

Both produce episodic content that keeps listeners returning.

This is especially true in talk radio. Content is regularly produced by both podcasters and broadcasters. Those episodes of content build upon each other to create an ongoing show.

8. Same Goal

Both hope to capitalize on the attention using a strong call-to-action.

Content is created by both in order to attract an audience. Once the audience is built, both try to activate that audience with a call-to-action.

The goal may be monetization, support or simply returning for the next episode. Either way, both hope to move a group of people.

9. Both Can Interact

Both are able to interact in real time.

This wasn’t true a few years ago. However, now that technology has come such a long way, both podcasters and broadcasters can interact with the audience in real time.

Podcasters chat with their listeners in real time using phone systems, Google hangout, chat rooms, and other methods. No longer is this feature limited to broadcasters.

… And Sometimes Different

There are a few features of podcasting that differs from broadcasting.

1. Podcasters Time Shift

Podcasting can be time shifted. This can be a benefit over broadcasting.

Podcast listeners can enjoy the show anytime they would like. They do not need to be next to the radio at a given time in order to hear their favorite show.

This is a feature and not necessarily something that makes podcasting inherently different from broadcasting. When we are talking about the art and goal of the audio, this is just a different way of delivering.

2. Podcasters Benefit From The Beginning

Podcast listeners start at the beginning. Mark Ramsey did a great session on this at New Media Expo 2015.

Some broadcast listeners join the show at the beginning and some join in the middle of the show. Podcast listeners all start at the beginning of the episode.

Rarely will a podcast listener download a show, scroll through to the 17:00 mark and begin listening there unless there is a specific direction to do so.

3. Podcasters Can Niche Down

Podcasting can afford to be more niche. By nature of the medium, broadcasting must be mass appeal. This is definitely a benefit for podcasting.

4. Podcasting Is Inclusive

Almost anyone can create a podcast. Podcasting requires a minimal investment. This makes it easy for most to get involved. There is no limit to the number of podcasts that can be created.

Getting on the radio requires getting through the gate keeper. Your other option is to buy your own station. Both are quite difficult.

Again, advantage podcasting.

The nine similarities between the two formats are largely foundational. The essence of the art is the same. The goal, methodology and tactics are identical between the podcasting and radio.

Podcasting enjoys a few benefits over broadcasting. The few differences are hardly enough to proclaim podcasting much different than radio.

I’d love to know what you think. E-mail me anytime at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Podcast Resources – Episode 117

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Podcast Resources – Episode 117

Podcast Resources

(These tools can be found on the resource page at PodcastTalentCoach.com. Most links on that page are affiliate links. I receive a variable commission for all purchases made using those links. If you would like to support the show, please take advantage of some of these resources.)

I have recently received questions from listeners looking to launch a podcast in 2016. I thought this would be a good time to review the tools I use to in my business. This includes the tools I use to create my podcast, website and newsletter. We will also review the resources I use to learn, grow and develop.

This episode is an encore presentation of an earlier episode you may have missed. If you did catch it last time, let this serve as inspiration and a little refresher.

I have been using most of these resources for at least 24 months. Some have been used longer. A couple tools are more recent. For the most part, I have been a long-time user and have been quite happy with each of them. That is why I feel confident recommending them to you. You can find affiliate links to most of these online at PodcastTalentCoach.com.

COACHING RESOURCE

This list doesn’t include much technical information, such as mixers, processors and software. I leave that to Dave Jackson at the School of Podcasting. He is the tech expert that helps me. If you are looking for help setting up the studio, Dave is your guy. He leads off my resources.

TECHNICAL TOOLS

A few technical tools from my studio include my mic, my mac and a few web tools.

My studio mic is an ElectroVoice RE20. This runs about $450. It is a high quality mic. This mic is probably much more than a beginning podcaster needs. However, if you are serious about podcasting, this is a great mic.

My backup mic is a Audio-Technica ATR-2100. It is a quality USB mic for the money. This costs around $60.

For editing, I use Adobe Audition in the studio. I will occasionally use Garage Band for quick projects or when I’m traveling.

I use a Mac Book Pro 13” for the flexibility. I cost me $1,200.

My mp3s are tagged with ID3 Editor from PA Software. The price tag was $15.

I host my audio with Libsyn. It runs $20/month.

My URLs were purchased through GoDaddy. The price really depends on the URL. You can usually find a deal. After the initial deal, I pay about $45/year.

I have a website on Homestead and one on Host Gator with WordPress. Homestead is a stand alone site builder. Host Gator just hosts my WordPress site. Homestead is $20/month. HostGator is $135/year, just over $11/month. WordPress is free.

On my website, I use Paypal for my transactions. Most of my providers accept it. Plus, they have a card option for my customers.

I use Aweber for my newsletter. It is $196/year. Just over $16/month. I looked at Mail Chimp. Both are very similar services if you have a list under 5,000.

Canva.com is a decent resource for creating graphics. They have a decent photo library as well. Most photos are about $1/photo.

I self-published my workbook through Create Space, an Amazon company. You simply upload a .pdf. It is fairly simple to use. Not very expensive. They also sell the workbook through Amazon and converted it to Kindle.

I am in the process of creating a membership portal through WishList Member. $297. They have solid training videos. I am not yet complete with this one.

LEARNING TOOLS

Dan Miller and 48Days.com is where it all started. He has great tools to help you find your passion and the work you love.

Internet Business Mastery is a great podcast and course that have helped me refine my business focus. Jeremy & Jason have been there and done it.

Michael Hyatt has a great membership site with Platform University. It is based on his book Platform, which is a must read as you develop your podcast. There is great learning inside the community. He only opens membership a couple times a year for enrollment. I got in early on this one and haven’t looked back since.

Audible.com has turned my car into a mobile classroom. I am usually listening to a couple books a month on top of the podcasts. You can get a free book when you use my affiliate link on the resources page.

Most of all, I cannot say enough about Dave Jackson and the School of Podcasting. If you want to learn the technical nuts and bolts, check out his course, membership and training tools.

You can find affiliate links to most of these online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. I would appreciate the support if you choose to use any of these links and great products.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

How To Define Your Avatar Or Target Listener – Episode 102

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How To Define Your Avatar Or Target Listener – Episode 102

AVATAR

As we develop our business around our podcast, we strive to build trust. In order to build trust, we must develop relationships with our listeners. Friendships are created when you truly know everything about a person. This is the reason it is crucial that you define your single target listener.

Many podcasters refer to their target listener as their avatar. This person is the single individual around which you create all of your content.

To develop your business, you need to define your niche. Your focus on your niche helps grow your community. The ideal customers within that niche gives the focus the power.

TRUST

We have heard it said many times before. People do business with those they know, like and trust. This trust is what our friendship with our ideal listener is developing.

To build trust with our podcast, we need to have a conversation with one person. In order to do that, we need to define that ideal listener. Our target listener.

I have created a Listener Development Worksheet. This template will walk you through the development of your target listener step-by-step.

Use this worksheet to create your ideal listener. The more you know about your listener, the better you will be able to communicate. Keep this person in mind while recording each show.

YOUR AVATAR

In this episode, we walk through the worksheet. By the end of the show, you should have your ideal listener well defined along with a visual image in your mind.

Download the Listener Development Worksheet along with six others at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

A few characteristics of your ideal listener we will define today include age, gender, income, interests and fears. These are only a few of the 17 characteristics we will examine.

Be sure you have downloaded the worksheet. It will be a tremendous help with this episode.

Your ideal listener will evolve over time. The more you learn about your target listener, the more you will fine tune your definition.

RESEARCH

You can learn more about your audience by using a survey like Survey Monkey. Be careful that you ask questions that your audience will be comfortable answering. Specific income might be too personal. A range might be better.

Let me know how it turns out. I would love to help you any way I can.

You can find these worksheets in the free Worksheet series online at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create Results Without A Big Mailing List – Episode 081

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Create Results Without A Big Mailing List – Episode 081

Erik K. Johnson & Tim McGraw

This week I am at the Country Radio Seminar in Nashville, Tennessee. It has been an amazing week so far. I am learning so much about audience engagement and am looking forward to sharing it with you in the coming weeks. That photo is me with the amazing Tim McGraw.

A few years ago, I saw an amazing presentation that debunked the 80/20 principle.

The 80/20 principle proposes that 80% of your results is created by 20% of your efforts. This could be 80% of sales from 20% of customers. It could also be 80% of success attributed to 20% of efforts.

This particular session focused on a study done in 2008 by Catalina Marketing that found that 80% of your results are driven by 2.5% of your efforts. Specifically, it found that 80% of sales at large companies like Coca Cola are driven by 2.5% of their customers. You can find the entire study here.

The study really proved that consumers no longer strive to be part of the crowd, but rather seek products that reflect their personal preferences, needs and lifestyle choices. Examples of companies that have built successful business models that appeal to the “me” consumer include Starbucks®, Apple®, Facebook® and Dell™.

This theory is perfect for podcasting. We can truly niche down and focus on the 2.5%. We can move the needle with a group of super fans much smaller than we once thought.

What are you doing to reach the 2.5%? How can you create results without that big mailing list?

Your podcast is a great vehicle to do just that. Let’s find the content to move your 2.5%.

EMOTIONAL CONNECTION

Develop your brand by developing an emotional connection. Stories will help you create that connection by revealing things about yourself. Hype will not sustain a brand. You need to be true to who you are.

A brand is a promise. You must deliver on that promise every time.

A brand is a collection of perceptions. You must deliver those perceptions consistently.

Speak the language of your audience when you deliver on your promise and your perceptions.

USE YOUR ASSETS

Use your podcast and other digital assets to drive your 2.5% to your website with a powerful call to action. Make sure you convert the visits with a very specific call to action every time.

In order to create a powerful call to action, create your plan. What is the goal of your show? Use your goal to create content that helps your audience. Create fans with your great content. Then, move them with your call to action.

You do not need a huge audience or a big mailing list. You only need a very passionate few percent. What are you doing to motivate your 2.5%?
The Country Radio Seminar is teaching me so much. It is also an amazing way to meet new people. You can do the same. Join me at New Media Expo April 13-16 in Las Vegas. I would love to see you when I present my session on powerful storytelling.

Learn how to use stories to create that engagement and powerful call to action. Meet a ton of new people to help you move your business forward. Use my affiliate link and promo code to save $100 on your registration here.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Important Trust Ingredient – Episode 072

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THE IMPORTANT TRUST INGREDIENT – Episode 072

trust ingredient

You and I have often discussed the ingredients necessary to create powerful business relationships. People do business with those they know, like and trust.

How do we create that important trust ingredient?

In order to develop trust, we need to build consistent structure with our podcasts.

Structure is necessary to build consistency and trust with your fans. The audience expects specific elements each time they listen to your show. They expect your style to be consistent. Your audience expects the host to be the same for each show. You must deliver to that expectation to build trust with your fans. This trust is where podcast monetization begins.

TRUST DESTROYED

In a matter of one meal, lack of consistency destroyed my trust in one of my favorite restaurants.

My family and I went out to a steakhouse for a family meal. This was a restaurant that we visited frequently. In middle America, steak is a frequent meal.

At this particular restaurant, my favorite steak is their filet. It is thick and juicy. Usually medium-well done. Just a little pink in the middle. Oh, so good.

If I don’t order it medium-well, it is usually too red in the middle. I can’t handle steak that does not look like it has been cooked all the way. A little pink and I’m good.

A nice baked potato usually accompanies the steak. I’m in Heaven. Perfect meal.

On this particular night, I ordered it the way I typically order it. Nice and consistent.

That is not the way I received it.

Instead, the waitress delivers me a something that resembles a flat iron steak. Not even an inch thick. It looked more like a strip than a filet.

If you are not a steak eater, this would look more like a flat chicken breast. A filet is more akin to a square tennis ball. The two are nothing similar.

In fact, I don’t even think this particular restaurant has a strip steak on the menu.

If I were to order a strip, I would order it medium. Anything more than that gets delivered like a piece of shoe leather. Which is exactly what this was. The steak was tough and nothing like I ordered or expected.

The consistency wasn’t there. The restaurant destroyed any trust I had in them to deliver a meal like I ordered. My favorite meal was gone.

That was the last time we had dinner at that restaurant. It was probably a year ago. The trust was gone.

I LIKE IT LIKE I LIKE IT

Think of McDonald’s. When you order a Big Mac at McDonald’s, you expect it to taste exactly like the last Big Mac you purchased and ate. This is true whether you purchased your last Big Mac at the same restaurant, across town, in another state or around the world. You expect it to be consistent.

If the Big Mac you purchased today suddenly has mustard and sauerkraut on it, you would be a little hesitant to purchase another next time. You know what you want and want what you know. You want consistency.

Now, translate that consistency to your favorite television show. It may be a regular, primetime show, the evening news or a variety show. It really doesn’t matter.

All shows follow the same pattern. Your favorite show opens with some sort of theme. It’s the same opening for every show.

The show open probably introduces the main characters, actors or hosts. The open lets you know what to expect over the course of the show. If it is a sitcom, you might see a couple outtakes from previous episodes that define the character. If it is the news, you may see a tease for the stories coming up. If it is a variety show, they will probably tell you about the big events on this particular episode.

The show will then roll through the content.

Eventually, the show concludes in a consistent manner each time. The news will usually end with some sort of lighthearted kicker story. Variety shows may have a musical guest at the end. Dramas end happily ever after.

Every successful show follows a pattern. It is a consistent pattern. You want to know what you’re getting each and every time.

The consistency gained from the show structure helps the audience feel at ease and comfortable with the program. If your listener is new, she is brought up to speed quickly when you tell her what to expect.

If the listener is a returning participant, your introduction causes him to say to himself, “Oh, yeah. Exactly how I remember it. This is the right show.”

If you are watching the news and suddenly there are two new anchors along with different people doing the weather and sports, you will wonder if you’ve somehow stumbled upon the wrong channel. It will feel uncomfortable. It isn’t what you expected.

Consistency helps your audience feel at home. Work to achieve it every time.

You can build that consistency by creating a structure for your show that will allow you to fill the time with great content.

FIVE Ws

Just like a great news story, you can create a solid structure by defining by the Five Ws. Develop the structure of your show by determining Who, What, When, Where and Why. This structure will be the same for every show. The content of the show will vary within the structure and keep the show fresh.

Who will the audience hear on the show? Many podcasts are hosted by one or two individuals. These people are the only voices the audience hears. One person as the host is the easiest version. If you are the only person featured on your podcast, you can create the show whenever you’d like. The downside is the fact that you will need to fill the entire show with content while talking to yourself.

On the other hand, two hosts pose other problems. With two hosts, there is often no a leader of the show. The direction of the podcast is left to chance. If both are not in the same room, they will often talk over each other without the help of non-verbal cues. It requires much more work and planning to make a show with two hosts sound smooth.

There are many other versions of “who”. The host can interview a guest on each show. Callers can be part of your show with the appropriate equipment. The audience could interact with the show via e-mail. Any version of the “who” works.

Multiple styles can be combined as well, like a late night talk show. You simply need to select the style that makes you most comfortable and be consistent with it.

As you are deciding your “who”, determine what role each voice will fill. If there are two personalities with the same opinion, one of them isn’t necessary. You’ll just waste the listener’s time trying to get each personality mic time while communicating the same message. It would be very similar to debating yourself. There must be contrasting points of view between the personalities to justify the existence of each on the show.

What will be on your show? This includes topics, interviews, callers, e-mail, audio clips, highlights, sound bites, articles and other material you might include in your content. Your “what” might be answering e-mail from listeners with questions on your topic. Your “what” might be your comments and thoughts on various articles you’ve discovered on your topic. You could interview experts in your field.

As I mentioned in earlier podcast episodes, using the voice of the person asking the question is much more powerful than you reading an e-mail. That second voice adds depth to the conversation, adds validity to the question and creates a sense of eavesdropping on the conversation by the listener.

If at all possible, use audio to make your point. As you determine what will be on your show, find the “what” that excites you.

Do not get into a rut. Be creative. Find new ways to say the same thing.

When will you record and post your show? Find the time of day when you have the most energy to record your show. If you are a morning person, and you love getting up at the crack of dawn full of energy, record your show in the morning. If you enjoy staying up late long after everyone else has gone to bed, and the creative juices are just beginning to flow, choose to record at night. There is a time of day when your energy is highest.

You need to find the right time, because your energy level will be noticeable coming through the speakers. If you are tired, your audience will know. If you are smiling, your audience will be able to hear it. Find your sweet spot, and record at that time.

You do not necessarily need to post your show at the same time that you record it. You could record four shows on the same day and post them periodically over time.

If your content is time sensitive, you might need to post your show the same day you record it. For instance, if you’re discussing the day’s news or sports scores from last night, it might be stale if you wait a week to post it.

You simply need to be consistent with your posts. If you decide to post your show every Tuesday at 3p, your listeners will expect your show to be there on Tuesday at 3p. You can’t post it at 5p. The listener will not come back hoping it is there two hours late. That would be similar to the 6 o’clock news starting at 7:30. That’s not when you expect it and you wouldn’t tune it at 7:30 hoping the news is there.

Deliver on your promise. Post consistently.

You also need to decide how often you will create a show. It could be daily, weekly or monthly. It should definitely be regular and consistent to build an audience. Your fans need to trust that the show will be there when you say it will be there. Select a schedule that you can handle on a consistent basis.

Do not attempt a daily show if you cannot stick to that schedule. It is much better to post weekly and deliver too much than it is to attempt daily shows and miss a few. Humans are creatures of habit. If you can get them listening to your show as a habit every Wednesday at noon during their lunch break, use it to your advantage by posting consistently.

Where will you create your show? This is an important detail. Each episode of your show could come from your “studio”. You could also record your show on location if you are incorporating guests.

The technology available today will allow you to record almost anywhere. Find a place where you can focus on your show and control the surrounding ambient noise. You want the sound quality of your podcast to be as good as possible. However, don’t let that restrict your creativity.

Strive to make it good, but do not let perfect get in your way. Location is an important factor to the professional sound of your show. Content is as well. Balance the two.

Why are you creating a podcast? You need to find your passion. If you are creating a podcast for reasons other than your passions, you will find it difficult to keep up the consistency required to be successful.

Find the one thing that you love to discuss more than anything else. That should be the topic of your podcast. Chances are, you already know a ton about your passion topic. You will also find it easy and rewarding to discuss that topic. Money will typically follow you if you follow your passion.

Work to create that important trust ingredient by building consistent structure with your podcasts.

Create a structure for your podcast that will remain consistent for each show. The consistency will help build trust with your audience. Deliver to the expectations of your listener. That trust is the first step in monetizing your podcast.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Magic Of Know, Like And Trust – Episode 067

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The Magic of Know, Like And Trust – Episode 067

Know, Like And Trust

It never ceases to astonish me how our podcasts create friendships with people we have never met.

My family and I were at a hockey game a few weeks ago. A couple came up to us and started chatting about the game as if they knew us. We had a great conversation with them as if we had been good friends for years.

When the couple moved on, my wife was a little irritated with me when she asked why I didn’t introduce her. I told her I didn’t know who they were.

These people knew me from being on the radio. I am part of their lives on a daily basis. I share things with them everyday on my show. These people feel like they know me and we are good friends even though we have never met.

This happens all of the time. As podcasters and broadcasters, we have a strange friendship with our listeners. That friendship give us influence.

How can we develop those friendships with our podcast?

Here are five tips.

1. Reveal Things

Reveal things about yourself on your show as you would to your good friends.

2. Include Your Listeners

Make your listeners part of your show. Don’t distance yourself from your listeners with e-mail and text messages. It is much more compelling to hear the words of another individual in their own voice than it is to hear someone else tell the story (or ask the question).

The passion of the message, story or questions isn’t contained in the e-mail. Inflection and meaning are always different when read by another individual. A scripted e-mail lack spontaneity.

I believe this is why interviews are so powerful. You can talk about a book, or you can interview the author. Which is more compelling?

3. Make Your Listener Feel Something

Emotions are powerful.

4. Be A Companion

Make your listener feel comfortable, as if they are spending time with a friend. They will come back time and again. You are their companionship.

5. Help People

Helping others should be your first priority.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Can You Make Money With Your Podcast? – Episode 064

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Can You Make Money With Your Podcast?

People love to buy. They hate to have people sell to them. Create interest and desire. Make your fans want to buy. The hard sell rarely makes your fan feel good about making the purchase. How do we use our content to develop the desire to buy rather than the method to sell?

I believe it is possible to make money “with” your podcast. To make money “from” your podcast is much tougher.

Are You Important In The Life Of Your Listener?

The most important marketer in a person’s life is someone they know, like and trust. We all know this.

I used Dave Jackson’s affiliate link to build www.ErikKJohnson.com. This was after I got to know, like and trust Dave and his information at the School of Podcasting.

As I started in Podcasting, I hit Google to find information. That is where I originally discovered Dave. Then, I began seeing him in blogs and hearing him referenced in other podcasts. I began listening to his podcast to get to know him.

One day, I got an e-mail from Dave. He wanted to chat with me about podcasting to see if we might be able to help each other. It was great. That is where my trust really started.

After a few months, I used his affiliate link to build out my website for my podcast. It all started with the relationship.

This is the primary reason word-of-mouth is so powerful. The recommendation that comes from word-of-mouth usually only comes from a friend. A friend is someone you know, like and trust.

If the recommendation comes from someone you don’t know, the message is no longer word-of-mouth. The suggestion is now called “marketing”, or “sales” or “a pitch”.

If you want the call-to-action within your podcast to be effective, you need to build that trusting relationship with your listener. From your stories will come self-revelation. This will allow your listener to get to know you. By being yourself and sincere, you will become likable. Finally, if you continually help your listener get what they want by putting their interests first, you will build trust.

On the Dave Ramsey Show, Dave helps people with every call he receives. Out of six or eight calls in an hour, he may mention his books, websites or seminars once. He will always mention his “baby steps” philosophy. However, he will rarely suggest people buy his products.

Dave reveals many personal things about his past and his family. The listener gets to know him. He is often blunt and honest. Dave’s tough love makes him likeable. The help he provides his callers builds trust. These steps make Dave’s manta become a true following. His listeners spread the word to the point where The Dave Ramsey Show has around 5 million listeners.

If you have built a true friendship with your listener, where they know, like and trust you, your call-to-action will be powerful. Spend time creating that relationship between your brand and your listener. Then and only then can you effectively use word-of-mouth.

Are you important in the life of your listener?

After you build the trust, you can then create a powerful call-to-action.

Is That You Calling?

To create a successful podcast, you need to create an effective call-to-action within your show. So, how do we measure success? If we are trying to get our audience to do something by using a call-to-action (listen again, buy our product, visit our website, support our cause), our call-to-action should be our determining factor of success. Measure what counts.

When you create your podcast, you should measure your success not by the number of listeners or downloads, but by conversions to whatever you want them to be or do.

Let’s say your goal is to get people to visit the store on your website. If you have 1,000 people listening to your show, but you only get 2 of them to act and actually visit the site, you really haven’t been successful.

However, if you only have 200 listeners, but 100 love everything you do and visit your site regularly, I would consider that a success. Having 1,000 listeners may sound better than 200. By closer evaluation, I would much rather have 100 fans than 2.

Don’t get fooled by measuring the incorrect statistic. Measure what counts. Measure your call to action.

Create an effective call-to-action, and measure it.

Selling Is Easy, Right?

I was listening to an interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspire him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. Your marketing and engaging relationship will have them ready for your call-to-action.

This week, review your podcast. Let’s discover ways to make money with your podcast.

  • Are you building trust and properly positioning your listener to do business with you?
  • Have you developed something to sell (other than advertising within your show)?
  • Have you developed your strong call-to-action?

Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

When Did Marketing Become Taboo? – Episode 063

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When Did Marketing Become Taboo?

When Did Marketing Become Taboo

I was listening to Daniel J. Lewis on “The Audacity To Podcast” Sept. 15th episode “How To Deal With Negative Feedback Toward You”. When did commercials become bad?

Here is the comment/quote:

“I feel like I just listened to an hour long infomercial. Daniel, I recognize your need to cross-promote and I realize that your income comes from podcasting. I feel overloaded with commercial information and have quite a difficult time separating out the real content from the commercial content. It’s just too much. Sorting out the things I would consider using from the things I have tried in the past but didn’t work from the commercials just wasn’t worth the hour I wasted this afternoon listening to your podcast today.”

Daniel goes to great lengths to avoid being self-promotional. He mentions his products at the end or when it is contextually relevant. Hence the “I have a tough time separating out the real content from the commercial content”. If one blends into the other, it fits with the content. Daniel hardly creates his podcast to be one big commercial.

On the other hand, why are the product mentions so bad? How do you find out about great products? How did you find out about the last great movie you saw? How did you discover the last great book you read? Didn’t someone tell you about it? Regardless if that person was a friend or part of a marketing message, that communication helped you discover new things. That is what marketing is all about.

Sure, not every marketing message is going to be tailored to your needs. There will be some that might miss the mark. It could be the mass mailing you received from the pizza joint down the street because you have a family of 4. It could be the political flyer you received because of your party affiliation.

Is it that difficult to ignore the irrelevant? Throw it out.

So, how do we make our marketing message relevant? How do we make the message valuable instead of an interruption?

Are You Shouting?

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your product, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Daniel does the opposite in “The Audacity To Podcast”. He usually starts by helping his listener. Then, if it fits, he will recommend a product or service to his audience.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show”, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “The Audacity To Podcast” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

Why is it bad to sell? Why must podcasting be only altruistic? If I have something that might help you solve your problems, why would it be wrong to recommend it to you while making a few dollars at the same time?

If you loved mowing grass, would it be right to expect you to mow my grass for free? You love to do it. Why should I pay you? If it is acceptable to charge you for mowing your yard, why isn’t acceptable to earn some money for helping you with your business?

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour per week, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours. Help your audience fill those hours, too.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting? Develop the friendship by delivering companionship.

Are You Delivering What They Seek?

People listen to podcasts, the radio and other audio for companionship. They don’t want to drive alone. People have an inner desire to be around other people. Companionship is the reason people listen to your podcast, even if you are selling something. Your listener will always ask, “What’s in it for me?”

Make your listener feel comfortable, as if they are spending time with a friend. When people listen to guys like Adam Carolla, they feel like they know him. Women feel like they could actually hang out with Ellen DeGeneres when they watch her show. Leo Laporte comes across as your friend when you listen to his tech podcast. Each of these shows are about that comfortable connection.

When you make your listener feel comfortable, they will come back time and again. You are their companionship. Are you delivering what they seek?

This week, start with your listener in mind. Ask yourself, “What is in it for them?” I want you to feel confident about your content. You will not please everyone. Focus on your one target listener you have defined using the Target Listener Worksheet at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

If you upset a few people, they either get over it or they would never be your customer in the first place. At least you are doing something to make them care.

Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Transform Your Podcast Into A Powerful Brand – Episode 061

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Transform Your Podcast Into A Powerful Brand – Episode 061

Podcast Into Powerful Brand

Two presentations I have attended really shaped my understanding and belief in the power of a brand. These two presentations have helped me create powerful radio and dominant brands. One was given by Seth Godin. The other came from B.J. Bueno.

A successful podcast is built on a strong relationship with the listener. It could be called a tribe as defined by Seth Godin in his book of the same name. The strong relationships with your listeners begin to develop your brand. You can then monetize your brand and associated relationships with an effective call-to-action. But it starts with the brand.

Powerful brands are more than just recognizable names. Powerful brands are full of emotion. A brand is a collection of perceptions, creating emotional connections, while consistently delivering on a promise. The more powerful the emotional connection, the more powerful the brand.

Take a moment to think of some very powerful brands and the associated emotions of the rabid fans of those brands. Nike. Volkswagen. Star Trek. Starbucks. Apple. Harley Davidson. Fans will go out of their way to interact with their favorite brand. These brands are unique, because they create powerful emotions within their fans that are not found in ordinary brands.

Ordinary brands lack emotion. Keds. Buick. Battlestar Galactica. Dunkin’ Donuts. Hewlett Packard. Honda. The powerful emotions are not present for most people in these brands.

These powerful brands are discussed in an amazing book entitled “The Power of Cult Branding” by Matthew W. Ragas and B. J. Bueno. The book describes the seven golden rules to cult branding. Emotion is the key to all seven. You can use these to transform your podcast into a powerful brand.

Social Groups

Great brands connect people who want to be different together. Examples include Star Trek and Harley Davidson.

Courage

Great brands show daring and determination, such as Oprah and Volkswagen.

Sell Lifestyle

Great brands sell lifestyle. These would include Apple and Jimmy Buffett.

Create Evangelists

Great brands create evangelists. I am sure you have encountered evangelists of Apple and WWE.

Contribution from Communities

Great brands accept contribution from communities. The communities around Linux, Star Trek, and WWE are influential in the development of the brand.

Inclusive

Great brands like Vans and Linux are inclusive and not some exclusive clique.

Personal Freedom

Great brands promote personal freedom. Apple and Linux let users be unique individuals.

All of these qualities are emotional. None are functional. It’s not the best, biggest, brightest, loudest, or #1 product. Cult brands are focused on emotion, not hype.

If you want to transform your podcast into a powerful brand that you can monetize with a strong call-to-action, stir emotion every time and be unique.
Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Secret To Know, Like And Trust – PTC Episode 057

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Secrets to Know, Like and Trust – PTC Episode 057
Four Essential Elements of Powerful Storytelling

Trust Me

WHY STORYTELLING

Have you noticed a lot of the business interview podcasts sound the same? We are hearing the same guests answer the same questions time and time again. How do you become unique in this sea of sameness?

Storytelling can transform your podcast. Your personal experiences and stories make you unique. No one has experienced the things you have experienced in the same way you have. If you want to stand out from every other podcast, share your personal stories during your show.

People do business with other people they know, like and trust. Your stories create that knowledge. That is where true friendships begin.

Stories help define your character and personality. If you want your listener to get to know you, share those personal connections. Connect, motivate and inspire your audience with your stories.

Don’t fit in, stand out.

Your personal experiences are the only way to make the content your own. Great songwriters do it. Great filmmakers do it. Share your stories and stand out.

ENGAGEMENT

In podcasting, you cannot afford to be boring. Interest in your story never remains constant. Your information can only become entertainment when interest is rising. A great story continues to develop the plot and raise the interest.

To create engagement, tell great stories. Keep the interest of your listener rising.

Date your listeners. You need to earn the privilege of talking to people who want to be talked to and selling things to people who want to be sold to. To earn that privilege, you need to build friendship.

Great friendships are developed through self revelation. When you share your personal thoughts and feelings with an individual through stories, you begin to create a bond with that person. It is life enrichment. Making our lives better through friendship is the reason we do not live is seclusion.

Over time, sharing stories will begin to build trust with your listener. Your stories share your values and beliefs.

Practice becoming a great storyteller.

GREAT STORYTELLERS

Practice being a great storyteller. Have the courage to listen to yourself. Hear and have courage to record your personal connections to the events happening around you.

When you use your podcast to create friendships, you are asking people to spend time with your every week. People share time with others that they like. They are asking themselves, “Would I enjoy taking a one-hour car ride with this person every week?”

People listen to audio while they drive, run and workout so they are not alone. They use the audio as companionship. Let your listener get to know you.

Your stories will also let others live vicariously through you. Your listener can enjoy your story of struggle and success without enduring the hard work and pain. Let them enjoy your stories.

ELEMENTS OF GREAT STORIES

There are four essential elements of great stories.

  • Engaging introduction
  • Reveal the details
  • Powerful Resolution
  • What else?

Engaging Introduction

Give them a reason to care. What do you want the audience to feel? Your stories make you human. Will it be humorous, compelling or tragic. My talent coach Bill McMahon would always ask, “What do you hope to make the audience laugh at, marvel at or better understand?”

Your listener can experience various emotions through your stories. You could elicit joy, sympathy, empathy, anger, tragedy, tenderness, humor, rage, patriotism or many others. Emotions make that personal connection to your story.

Pull your listener into the story. Your engaging introduction is a roadmap. It should be a solid headline that tells your listener exactly where your story will go. “Tell me if I’m gonna go to Hell for this…”

Reveal the details

Details are more believable than generalities. Your details will make your story come to life.

When you develop your details, use all 5 senses. Draw the picture in the mind’s eye of your listener. Make the story come to life. Put your listener right there in the moment. This is theater of the mind.

Your details reveal specifics about your thoughts, beliefs and character.

Resolution

Your resolution should be a powerful reframing of introduction. Your will know when you reach your conclusion when you have successfully achieved the emotional goal set at the beginning. What did you hope to make your audience laugh at, marvel at or better understand? When you’ve achieved that goal, get to the resolution.

What else?

Asking “What Else” will transform your show. Let your story lead to something bigger. Maybe you turn your story into a discussion on Facebook. Maybe your story leads into an interview. What else can you do with it? Create some great entertainment.

HOW YOU CAN BE A STORYTELLER

What do you want to make your listener feel?
What is the engaging set up?
How will it be revealed in the story with vivid details?
What is the resolution?
What else can you do with it?

I’d love to help you create great stories with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Top 11 Takeaways From Podcast Movement – PTC Episode 056

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Top 11 Takeaways From Podcast Movement 2014

Podcast Movement 2014
Podcast Movement 2014

Podcast Movement 2014 was held in Dallas, Texas August 16th & 17th. For an inaugural event, PM14 was well run and full of great information. The guys did an amazing job putting it together.

Earlier this year, Dan Franks reached out to me and asked if I would present a session at PM14. I was truly honored. My session on the power of storytelling went over very well. Many people came to the stage after my session to tell me how useful they found the information. I really appreciated the feedback.

I am already looking forward to Podcast Movement 2015 in Fort Worth, Texas.

My notebook filled with great notes from PM14. On this episode, I want to share with you my 11 top takeaways from the event. I hope these spark a little something in your to move your podcast forward and transform your content.

1. Have a plan to make money.

This came from Chris Brogan’s Keynote “Podcasting As A Business Driver”. If you want to support your habit/hobby, have a plan to generate income. This could be from your product, service or other income stream. Figure out how to cover your cost at a minimum.

2. Copy = Pale Imitation = Ignored.

Srinivas Rao offered this insight in his Keynote “Genuine Curiosity – The Fuel Behind The Fire”. Chris Brogan said, “No one ever won a race looking sideways.” Be brave and have the courage to be unique. Tell some great stories.

3. What is your brand personality?

Who are you really and who do your clients need you to be? Kristin Thompson asked these questions during her session “Rock Your Talk & Profit Big … Beyond The Podcast”. Define your brand personality. Then, thread it through everything you do.

4. Don’t use white in your logo.

This was mentioned during “Top Podcasters Share Three Success Secrets For Podcasting”. It was a panel discussion with Michael StelznerCliff Ravenscraft, and Chris Brogan. If you want it to stand out in iTunes store, get rid of the white. Make your logo pop.

5. Involve others.

During his session “10 Ways to Take Your Podcast From Average To Amazing”, Daniel J. Lewis suggested you use interviews, conversations, and shared presentations to get others involved with your show. Empower your audience to share your content. Delegate others to help you achieve tasks.

6. #1 goal of podcast marketing is opt-in.

Tim Paige mentioned this in his session “The Top 7 Ways To Grow Your Podcast And Turn Listeners Into Leads”. We’ve heard it many times that the money is in the list. Use your podcast to grow your list every opportunity that you get.

7. Think of your avatar in the car or excercising. What can you provide to make the experience better?

This was a great piece of advice from Jaime Tardy during her Keynote “The Future Of Podcasting”. If you want to connect and engage with your audience, put yourself in their shoes.

8. Learn what the knobs do.

To learn your equipment and what it does, press record and narrate your actions as you turn knobs. Hear how it sounds. This was a tip offered by Dave Jackson in his session “The Art Of Editing Audio – Finding The Diamond In The Rough”. What better way to figure out what all of those knobs do other than tinkering with it.

9. Ask your tribe questions about what they struggle with.

Jessica Kupferman’s session was titled “Your Commmunity Of Kindred Spirits: Why, How and When To Build One”. She offered this tidbit while helping us discover the power and connection of a community.

10. Give your guests resources to promote your show after they are on.

This came during a panel discussion called “Promote Your Podcast The Right (And Unique) Way”. If you want your guests to promote your show after they appear, make it easy for them. Give them graphics, quotes or audio clips they can use to help spread the word.

11. Comfort and awesome usually do not overlap.

I loved this line. It was another from Chris Brogan during his Keynote “Podcasting As A Business Driver”. Be brave. Try something new. Be unique. Have the courage to step out and tell personal stories that cannot be copied. That’s when you’ll get noticed. Don’t be comforable. Be awesome.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Find Your Motivation – PTC Episode 048

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Find Your Motivation – PTC Episode 048

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Are you like me? There are times when I find it difficult to find the motivation to take myself to the studio and create a great show. Sometimes it is so much easier to stay on the couch and watch some television.

Just like an athlete, we sometimes just need to find a way to get fired up.

This week, I received this e-mail.

 

I have a podcast about fly fishing that has pod faded. Because I am a fly fisher I thought such a podcast would be ideal. But, it became so much work from pre-production, to post-production, to hitting the publish button on iTunes, that I stopped after 10 months.

I enjoyed interviewing the people on the podcast and the preparation, but quickly grew tired of all the other work it took to publish. 4-6 hours for a 1 hour podcast.

My current challenge is that I enjoy doing several recreational things, but I am not “passionate” about any of them. I just enjoy doing them.

Also, I did not have a product or service to sell and still do not. Since this is not a hobby for me, I want to make a good income from this.

I have purchased your book for my Kindle and am reading it now. I am considering consulting with you for an hour or two to move things along faster.

Right now I am re-grouping and figuring out what to do next and your podcast is a great help.

Thanks again for a great podcast.

Name Withheld

 

There are a few issues within this e-mail.

  • How do we find the motivation to fight through the blahs and record consistently?
  • How can we streamline our workflow to make better use of our time?
  • How can we do more of what we love and less of what we dislike?
  • How can we generate some income?

 

Motivation

Like most podcasters, I sometimes fight the blahs. Are you like me? Do you have those days where you could record for hours on end when you have the drive and you’re fired up?

Then, I experience those other days where I just cannot find the motivation to get into the studio. I feel alone. I wonder if anyone is actually listening.

There are a few ways to find the motivation.

Tips:

  • Find the time of day and day of the week that gives you the most energy.
  • Be consistent with the day and time of the week you record – schedule yourself.
  • Record a few episodes in one sitting to batch similar functions.
  • Always work a week or two ahead to ease the pressure to produce.
  • Have a back up episode in the can in case life happens.

 

Streamline the workflow

Tips:

  • Record a few episodes at one sitting. Setting up the gear takes time. Logging in, gathering material, getting to the studio, getting in the right frame of mind all takes time. You can perform the tasks once for multiple episodes when you put it all into one sitting. You could conduct one recording session per month for 6 hours and be done.
  • Minimize your editing by relaxing on the perfectionism.
  • Find the areas that eat up a lot of your time and remove or condense them.

 

Do What You Love

If you hate editing or creating show notes or posting the episode, farm it out. Use virtual assistants or production assistants. Make it easy on yourself.

 

Much of this costs money, so …

 

Generate Income

  •  What do fly fishers need?
  • Find something that is easy for you to create. Develop your product funnel. In this case, it could be location guides, gear guide, gear reseller, instruction tutorials, tours, travel coordinator, make your own flies.
  • Build different tiers for the funnel.
  • Michael Hyatt & Dan Miller did an interview about making $150,000 a year from your platform. Doing a podcast for 10 months creates a solid base. There is surely something in that niche that could be monetized. It simply needs to be uncovered.

 

This week:

  • Find the motivation to fight through the blahs & record consistently
  • Streamline the workflow
  • Do what you love
  • Build your funnel and begin to generate income

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Your Effective Call To Action – PTC 045

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Effective Call To Action – PTC045

(photo by Albo)
(photo by Albo)

I was listening to an interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.  It makes your call to action powerful.

 

Selling is Easy

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspiring him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

We have discussed the call-to-action in previous episodes of Podcast Talent Coach. We simply need to determine what we hope to accomplish with our podcast episode before we begin recording.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

Building relationships with your podcast involves telling great stories. Revealing things about yourself through stories makes you real. Your listeners get to know and like you. As you continue to help them over time, you build the trust they seek.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. Your marketing and engaging relationship will have them ready for your call-to-action.

Do the hard work up front to make selling easy.

 

Shouting Will Not Help You

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your product, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show”, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “Smart Passive Income” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour per week, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours. Help your audience fill those hours, too.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting?

 

Ask For The Sale

After you’ve done the hard work building the relationship, don’t forget to ask for the sale.

One afternoon last week, I stopped by the quickie mart to get something to drink. As I waited in line at the cash register, the gentlemen in front of me set his purchase on the counter.

Among his items was a 2-liter bottle of soda. The bottle of soda was $1.69. The clerk said, “Did you know these are on sale two for $2? You can grab another and save yourself some money.”

The customers responds with, “Looks like I need to grab another bottle.”

By simply asking for the sale, the clerk doubled the purchase. The customer also benefitted by saving some money.

In fact, everyone wins in this transaction. The store is paying the clerk an hourly wage whether he sells one bottle of soda or 100. The cost of the clerk’s time to the store remains constant. Wages are the biggest expense to the store when figuring cost of goods sold. Therefore, by adding another bottle of soda to the purchase, even at the lower price, the store makes more money also.

It all happened because the clerk asked for the sale.

 

This week, review your show to ensure you are building those relationships.

• Start with the listener instead of your product or service

• Determine how you are going to help your listener with this episode

• Put a strong call-to-action at the end of the episode

 

Let’s Work Together

I would love to help you with your podcast. If you would like to improve your content, call-to-action and business, I have a few openings for coaching clients.

You need to be serious about making some money with your podcast. It may not be millions. However, you need to have the desire to make a little money.

We will work together to build a customized plan for you, your show and your business.

We have to date before we can get serious, right?

I’m offering a complimentary coaching call to a few candidates who are serious about their improvement. We need to see if we are a good fit for each other.

There will be no high pressure sales pitch. We can review your show to see if we work well together. If it clicks, we can lay out a coaching plan for you. If the call is not all you had hoped, no harm. We’ll just continue on as friends.

There is only room for a few. My calendar simply will not allow me to coach everyone.

If you are interested … and serious … e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. We can get the conversation started.

 

Find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Your Podcast Brand Revisited – PTC 044

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Your Podcast Brand Revisited – PTC044

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This week, we revisit my most popular episode. This episode has been downloaded almost twice as many times as any other episode I have released.

Maybe you missed it. Maybe you caught it and this will be a great refresher. Either way, I have received great feedback on the content and I am sure you will enjoy it.

On this episode, we discuss how to turn you, your content and your podcast into a brand. How do you create that powerful podcast brand to stand out amongst the sea of podcasts that are available online?

Find the original show notes HERE.

 

A few housekeeping notes this week.

Get a one-hour coaching session with Dave Jackson and me for only $50 if you act before June 30, 2014.

Dave and I are now hosting the Podcast Review Show together. Our guests appear on the show to have their podcast reviewed by the two of us.

Typically, hiring the two of us individually for an hour would be hundreds of dollars. Not only do you get an hour of consulting from us on this show, you get to plug your show for a sixty minutes.

Our guests typically pay $99 to be featured on the show. I’ve convinced Dave to cut you a break. By using the code “coach50”, you can appear on the show for only $50.

You get half off. Still an hour. Still feedback from both of us. Still plugging your show. Half the price.

The code is “coach50”. This deal ends June 30, 2014. Get in on it now before we close it.

GET REVIEWED – CLICK HERE.

 

If you are truly serious about building your podcast, improving your show and increasing your traffic, you should also be attending the Podcast Movement in Dallas on August 16 & 17.

Find my affiliate link online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. We are only 10 weeks away from the Podcast Movement. Register today.

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Building Your Podcast Business – PTC Episode 028

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Building Your Podcast Business

Most every podcaster has the desire to turn their podcast into a business. Though some podcasters treat their show as a hobby and an outlet for their passion, many reach a point where they wish to monetize their efforts. Podcast profits are possible in many forms when podcasters get creative.

Most podcasts do not generate enough cash to stand alone as a business. There are ways to generate revenue from the podcast, such as advertising and sponsorships. These methods typically bring in money in direct relation to the size of the audience. It is traditionally called CPM, or cost per thousand. (M for mille – Latin for thousand; M is also the Roman numeral for thousand.)

There are two primary issues with relying on advertising as your primary revenue source.

The first downside of CPM is the direct relation of hours to dollars. When you stop putting in hours, you stop taking out dollars. When you stop creating the podcast, the revenue stream stops as well. When you exchange hours for dollars, that is called a job. When you create something one time and it generates a continuous stream of income, that becomes a business.

Limited inventory and revenue is the second problem with advertising. There is a limit to the amount of sponsorship time possible within any particular episode. If your podcast is an hour in length, how much advertising could the show possibly contain? Two sponsors? Four sponsors?

At some point, the adverting becomes a negative to the audience. This is the issue terrestrial radio is facing. The commercial time has expanded to a level that is negatively affecting time spent listening to radio. Stations are hoping listeners will sit through 12 minutes of commercials on music stations and nearly 20 minutes on talk stations. People are looking for other content that does not force feed them content they do not desire. This is where your podcast will thrive.

You can turn your podcast into a business by developing a suite of products. Brendon Burchard, the author of “The Millionaire Messenger” and creator of Experts Academy, describes it as an integrated product suite. The podcast attracts a group of followers without wasting their time. Your content and message builds a friendships. Listeners begin to know, like and trust you.

Once you have built a loyal group of listeners that trusts you and your message, you can ask them to join your list in exchange for something free. This gets people to take the next step to become engaged with your brand. I use this with free worksheets, videos and other content. Fans give me permission to e-mail them pertinent, valuable content. The additional free content continues to build the relationship.

After delivering content over time, you can begin to monetize the trust you’ve built. Start by asking your fans to purchase a low end product, such as this workbook. The low end product doesn’t cost much. It is simply a purchase to break the barrier to make your fan comfortable doing business with you. Your listener can risk $20 to see if your products are as good as you say. Again, we are building more trust.

If you could sell 1,000 e-books at $20 each to your audience of 10,000 listeners, you would generate $20,000 in revenue.

Let’s compare that to the CPM model. The average CPM in podcasting is around $25. Using that same 10,000 listeners, your CPM factor would be 10, because you have ten “thousands”. $25 CPM x 10 “thousands” equals $250 per episode sponsorship. Two sponsors per episode would generate $500 per episode. Producing 50 episodes per year would then bring in $25,000 annually. That is just a little better than the e-book model.

There is a big difference between the two methods. With the e-book, you write it once. It then continues to generate revenue. You must create your podcast every week to keep the revenue flowing. At the beginning of the next year, your podcast starts over again. Your e-book continues to sell with little additional effort. You can also write another book to begin doubling your revenue.

The next step is a mid-range product. This would be something in the $200 range. While you continue to deliver great, free content and your book continues to sell and build trust, you can then produce your mid-level product. At some point, you will ask for that sale. Convincing 100 of your 10,000 fans to purchase your $200 product will generate $20,000. We are talking about converting one percent of your audience at this level.

This style of product layering continues as you build your business. It is all based on the relationships you are creating with your podcast. You are building trust with your podcast. The fantastic, free content allows your fans to know, like and trust you. Your podcast is the foundation of your business.

Your podcast is not your income generator. The relationships you have build with your audience becomes the conduit to create income. Your friendships will be the basis on which your business is built. We will turn those relationships into a suite of great products centered around your content.

Entrepreneur on Fire” with John Lee Dumas is arguably one of the most successful recent podcasts in terms of revenue generation. John releases a daily podcast 365 days a year. He has been able to monetize his podcast at a high level using sponsorships. In fact, he posts his monthly income report at www.EntrepreneurOnFire.com/income. According to his site, Dumas generated $39,400 from sponsorships in December 2013.

Even at that level of success, John Lee Dumas has other products. At nearly $40,000 a month, his show is bringing in almost half a million dollars in annual sponsorship revenue. If you examine the income report, advertising within the show isn’t even the largest source of income during the month of December. Entrepreneur on Fire generated $52,763 with John’s “Podcasters’ Paradise” program.

In total, Dumas lists 7 different revenue sources on his income report. These include a mastermind, sponsorships, an ebook, an audiobook, his program, one-on-one mentoring and affiliates. This is a great example of a suite of products. The entire program is built on the foundation laid by his podcast.

If you hope to build a business around your podcast, begin by developing your product suite. Brainstorm the various products and services you can create. Make a list of five to ten products that will begin to generate revenue for you. Then, start creating the one that will be quick and easy. This is where your business will begin to take shape.

Your entire business will be built around your podcast. This is where people will begin to trust you. Everything described in this workbook up to this point has been designed to get your audience to know, like and trust you. Only when we reach that point can we begin to monetize the show.

You are creating a relationship with your audience. The more you reveal about yourself on your show, the more you create influence through friendship. Your sales will be built on the trust you are developing.

Help your audience. In sports coaching it is often said that players will not care how much the coach knows until they know how much the coach cares. Show your listeners you care by helping them solve their problems. Develop that friendship.

Once your friendship is built, your listeners will begin to move through your product funnel.

Your product funnel is just as it sounds. We bring many people into the big end of the funnel. As they move through, the price goes up until only a few come out the small end. Your podcast and other free content is at the big end of the funnel. As we move to the low-tier $20 product, we lose a group of listeners. We then lose another group when we progress to the $200 product. Listeners continue to move along the funnel until we have a few dedicated listeners playing thousands of dollars at the small end of the funnel.

You cannot begin at the middle of the funnel. People do not begin by buying your $200 without knowing anything about you. The entire funnel is based around your podcast and the relationships you are creating.

Though your podcast will not be your primary revenue generator, it will be the foundation for your business. This is where it all begins. Make it great. Tell the truth. Make it matter. Have fun. Before you know it, you will be building great friendships on the way to an amazing business.

 

This week:

Develop your free bonus content

Launch an e-mail database like Aweber or Mail Chimp

Brainstorm a low-tier and mid-tier product you can create

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Power Of You – PTC Episode 023

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The Power Of You

This week is a little self-reflection. I’m not sure I’m doing my job with my message and serving you as well as I can. Is my communication cutting through in the correct way?

This past weekend, I attended the New Media Expo (NMX) 2014 in Las Vegas. I had an incredible time and learned a lot. The inspiration I receive by attending these conferences is amazing.

The only thing more incredible than the inspiration is the friendships. Mike & Izabela from Music Radio Creative held a meet up at an amazing wine cellar within the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. We all had an incredible time mingling with other amazing podcasters. Mike & Izabela held the gathering in a room of the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room at the Rio. It was like sitting in their living room with couches, chairs and end tables near a bar filled with wine and cheese. The intimate setting really spawned some great discussions.

During the meet up, I had the chance to sit down with Kenn Blanchard from “Black Man With A Gun”, Dave Jackson from “School of Podcasting” and Rem Lavictoire from “The Sci-Fi Movie Podcast”. We had a great time sharing stories about our lives and podcasting. It was a gift.

Kenn mentioned to me that he wasn’t sure how my podcast would be received. He said I was so passionate and determined about my style that he felt it might turn some people off. I loved the feedback. His words really got me thinking.

I stepped back and assessed my message. Is my message really being communicated they way I hope it is? That leads us to the podcast this week.

My message is all about you. I never want to tell you how you should do anything. I want to show you ways it may be done and let you decide. I want you to be you in a way that only you can do it. It isn’t a prescription. It should be a thought starter.

There are a few things I wholeheartedly believe about any podcast, such as podcasts should be built to attract and grow an audience. I also believe every podcaster should be their own unique self. How that happens should be completely up to you.

Today, we discuss the power of you. Many thanks to Kenn Blanchard for showing me the path. His insights are cherished. Check out his NMX2014 session with the virtual ticket if you have the chance.

Here are the 8 facets of the Power of You.

 

1. Be yourself

Only you can be you

Don’t simply copy somebody else

2. Stick to your beliefs

Be true to yourself

Can’t consistently be something you’re not

Hard to fake it without tripping up

3. Tell the truth

Honesty fosters relationships

4. Use your personal style

To make your show unique, add your personal style

Do it in a way that only you can do it

5. Stories define your character

Listeners will learn about you with stories

Stories breed friendships

6. Have fun

People don’t simply want info, they want entertainment

Much more fun to learn when the content is entertaining

7. Be consistent

People know what they like and like what they know

They want to know what to expect when they listen – Deliver the goods every time

8. Be memorable

Own your category – When they think of your category, they think of you

Don’t want them to casually listen then go away

Hard to monetize your activities if you are not top-of-mind

Most marketing is focused on top-of-mind awareness and a strong call-to-action

Call-to-action is powerful when you are the first one that comes to mind

 

This week …

Review two of your shows to see if you are being yourself

Find one personal story to include in your next podcast

Do one thing in a way only you can do it and make it memorable

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Creating Powerful, Podcast Relationships – PTC Episode 022

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Creating Powerful, Podcast Relationships

It has been said may times before. People do business with people they know, like and trust.

To make your podcast successful, you must create meaningful, powerful relationships with your listeners.

In this episode, we review five of the many ways to improve and foster your listener relationships.

 

Their Voice Will Always Be More Meaningful

One major purpose of your podcast is to foster relationships with your listeners. Many podcasters use e-mail, texts, tweets and posts to interact with their audience. The podcast host typically reads these on the air.

Unfortunately, using these methods of communication puts distance between you and your listener. (read more)

 

Assume Your Listener Is New

The opening of your podcast should explain the purpose of your podcast and let your listeners know exactly what to expect as if this is the first time they have ever heard the show.

A well-crafted introduction serves two purposes.

First, it tells the brand new listener who is hearing the show for the very first time exactly what to expect from the show. Second, those that have heard the show before are confident that they are in the right place.

Your audience size is always changing. It is either growing or shrinking. The direction of the movement is your choice. Always work to grow your audience.

Your show will always lose listeners for various reasons. Sometimes they no longer have a use for your content. Sometimes other shows take the place of your show. Maybe they got a new phone and simply didn’t subscribe again. The size of your audience is always changing.

Since listeners are always moving through the “out” door, you need to continuously work to bring listeners through the “in” door. Always work to find new listeners.

As new listeners constantly join your show, treat each episode like it is your first, because it could be the first episode for your listeners.

 

Your Listeners Deserve a “Thank You”

Thanks for listening. I appreciate the help you give me.

It is such an easy way to strengthen your relationship with your listener. Time is something your listener will never get back. She has just chosen to give it to you.

Show your appreciation. If your listeners know you are honestly grateful for their time, you begin to strengthen your relationship. The relationship is a two-way street.

You must be honest and authentic. You can’t thank them in a gas-station-attendant-I’ll-never-see-you-again kind of way. You must deliver it from the heart. It should be the kind of thank you that you would give a stranger who stopped to help when you ran out of gas.

Your listener is your lifeblood. Your audience is the reason you exist. Without your listener you have no show. She has many, many choices when allocating her time. Let her know you appreciate her for spending her time with you.

Thank you for giving me your time. You have done a ton for me just by being here. I truly appreciate you.

 

You vs. Me

Great marketing is like a mirror. It is a reflection of the customer, not of the company. Great products that use great marketing are focused on the needs, wants and desires of their customers. To make turn your podcast into a great brand, focus on your listener and not on yourself.

Scheels had a great commercial for their snowboarding gear. The commercial was completely focused on the lifestyle of the snowboarder. (read more)

 

Be On Their Level

When you’re creating a relationship with someone, you never want to act as if you are better or above the other person. Even if your position allows you opportunities that your counterpart may not receive, you must be humble about those experiences. People like other people who are similar to themselves.

Take the approach of “I’ve been there and know what you’re going through.” You will empathize with your listener. When you come off like “I know everything”, you appear condescending. Nobody likes a know-it-all.

Show respect for your listener and her problems.

Because I am on the radio, I often get the incredible opportunity to meet many musicians. If I were to brag about these fantastic experiences, I would appear arrogant. It would sound as if I believe I was better than you. You probably wouldn’t find it easy to like me much.

Maintain your humility. Keep yourself on the same level as your audience. If you have an opportunity to interview someone famous, be as honored and excited as your listener would be.

You are building a relationship with your listener. Be likable. Be on the same level as your audience.

————

I’d like to thanks Andrew Hellmich and John Hames for their questions included in the show this week.

Find Andrew Photo Biz Xposed.  CLICK HERE

Find John at Sound Commentary.  CLICK HERE

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find FREE worksheets and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Where Is Your Podcast Going? – PTC Episode 021

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Where is your podcast going in 2014?

A goal is a dream with a deadline.  What are you dreams for the next year?  If you don’t have a map & destination, you’ll only wander.  You’ll never get anywhere.  Let’s be specific and set some deadlines.

What is the one big thing you want to accomplish over the next year?  Develop little steps to get there.  Break the big goal into bite-sized pieces.

If you create a weekly show, you only have 52 shows over the next 12 months.  It may sound like a lot.  However, you need to be intentional to reach your goals.

What is your call to action within your podcast?  How can we make that call-to-action more effective?  Where are you sending your listener each episode to get more info?  Be specific and write it down.

Are you monetizing your podcast?  There are many possibilities, such as books, speaking engagements, seminars, affiliates, products and more.  If you have yet to monetize your podcast, schedule your time to create something powerful.  Be sure to include deadlines.

Do you interview guests on your show?  Create a list of guests you’d like to get on the show.  Be brave and reach out to those people.  Let’s get them on the show.  Give yourself a goal with a deadline.

Are you effectively planning each show before you begin?  Sometimes it is difficult to get motivated to record your show on a regular basis.  Plan ahead.  Download the planning worksheet at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.  When you lack motivation, revert to plan you’ve already created.

Are you reviewing your show on a regular basis?  To get better, you need to look at game tape.  All great sports teams review tape of previous games.  You should do the same.  Again, get the worksheet at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.  Finding someone that can help you honestly review your show will help as well.

The next year can be huge for you if you plan.  Set deadlines to turn your dreams into goals.  Be sure to find balance in all areas of your life.

Take some chances.  Go for the big interview or launch a product.  Dream big.  You might just reach your dreams.

I want to thank you for a tremendous 2013.  It has been quite a success for me.  I’ve launched the podcast to great success.  Many have downloaded my worksheets and purchased the Podcast Talent Coach workbook.  It has been a blast.  I couldn’t do it without you.

I do want to thank a few people for the 5-star reviews on iTunes.

I hope to see you at New Media Expo in Las Vegas in January.  Let me know if there is any way I can help you with your podcast.  E-mail me anytime at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Have a fantastic 2014.

Powerful Profitable Podcast Stories

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Powerful Profitable Podcast Stories

Our goal is to create meaningful relationships with our listeners. Powerful, profitable relationships. We use engaging content to solidify those friendships.

What did you reveal about yourself on your show this week?

From self-revelation comes friendship. Can you think of a true friend that you know very little about? Friendship become stronger the more you share with each other. People learn things about you through the stories you tell.

How can you use the stories you tell to solidify your brand and strengthen your relationships?

We’ve discussed storytelling in Podcast Talent Coach Episode 002.

-The Power of Great Storytelling

-The parts of a great story

-How to structure a story

Today, I want to teach you about three other areas of storytelling that can help transform your podcast into powerful, engaging entertainment.

What Did You Reveal Today?

When you tell stories on your podcast, you reveal things about yourself. Vivid details are critical elements of great storytelling.

Details are more believable than generalities.

Details reveal specifics about your thoughts, beliefs and character.

Details put your listener in the moment helping them envision your story in their mind.

Garrison Keillor, in one of his “Stories From Lake Wobegon”, describes a woman who endures crushing loneliness and town gossip. (read more)

Memorable Words

American children’s author Dr. Seuss (Theodor “Ted” Suess Geisel) was more interested in telling a good story than he was in telling a true story. He often exaggerated. He always used wonderful, colorful words.

The good story approach is even described In his biography at www.Seussville.com. Dr. Seuss and his wife were unable to have children.

“To silence friends who bragged about their own children, Ted liked to boast of the achievements of their imaginary daughter, Chrysanthemum-Pearl. … He included her on Christmas cards, along with Norval, Wally, Wickersham, Miggles, Boo-Boo, Thnud, and other purely fictional children. For a photograph used on one year’s Christmas card, Geisel even invited in half a dozen neighborhood kids to pose as his and Helen’s children. The card reads, ‘All of us over at Our House / Wish all of you over at / Your House / A very Merry Christmas,’ and is signed ‘Helen and Ted Geisel and the kiddies.’”

Part of the magic that was Seuss was created by the words he used. (read more)

Tease With Anticipation

Anticipation is a key feature to storytelling. Your story should build just like a good plot builds in a movie. You need to make your audience anticipate the content that is on the way.

Your podcast should be like a vacation you are planning to take. The fantastic anticipation for the trip is almost as pleasurable as the trip itself. You can’t wait for the trip to arrive.

You want your listener to feel the same way about your content. When they can’t wait for the story to arrive, you have created some great content.

Teasing is the art of creating anticipation for your audience to entice them to stick around for the payoff to your setup. It is a critical element of your show. Teasing helps create momentum for your podcast. (read more)

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Is That The Right Measurement? …

Is that the right measurement?

(photo by bartekwardziak)

Many podcasters and bloggers measure their success by the number of downloads of, or visits to, their material. Unless you are blogging or podcasting simply as a hobby, this is a mistake. Downloads and visits really don’t move the needle for you. They don’t generate revenue or move your product.

You need to figure out what you want your audience to do and how you measure it? What is your call-to-action? Maybe you want them to visit your website. Maybe you want them to buy your product. Maybe you want them to donate to your cause. Determine the call-to-action.

Once you figure out what you want your audience to do, you will then know what to measure. It may be visitors to a specific URL on your website. It could be units sold. You can easily measure the donations to your cause. All three of those events move the needle. Those are the things you should be measuring.

What are you measuring?

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Find your call-to-action. Is that the right measurement?

Is That You Calling? …

Is that you calling?

(photo by erwinova)

To create a successful podcast, you need to create an effective call-to-action within your show. So, how do we measure success? If we are trying to get our audience to do something by using a call-to-action (listen again, buy our product, visit our website, support our cause), our call-to-action should be our determining factor of success.

When you create your podcast, you should measure your success not by the number of listeners or downloads, but by conversions to whatever you want them to be or do.

Let’s say your goal is to get people to visit the store on your website. If you have 1,000 people listening to your show, but you only get 2 of them to act and actually visit the site, you really haven’t been successful.

However, if you only have 200 listeners, but 100 love everything you do and visit your site regularly, I would consider that a success. Having 1,000 listeners may sound better than 200. By closer evaluation, I would much rather have 100 fans than 2.

Don’t get fooled by measuring the incorrect statistic. Measure what counts. Measure your call to action.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create an effective call-to-action, and measure it. Is that you calling?

Emotionally Powerful? …

Emotionally Powerful?

(photo by hvf)

A successful podcast is built on a strong relationship with the listener. It could be called a tribe as defined by Seth Godin in his book of the same name. The strong relationships with your listeners begin to develop your brand. You can then monetize your brand and associated relationships with an effective call-to-action. But it starts with the brand.

Powerful brands are more than just recognizable names. Powerful brands are full of emotion. A brand is a collection of perceptions, creating emotional connections, while consistently delivering on a promise. The more powerful the emotional connection, the more powerful the brand.

Take a moment to think of some very powerful brands and the associated emotions of the rabid fans of those brands. Nike. Volkswagen. Star Trek. Starbucks. Apple. Harley Davidson. Fans will go out of their way to interact with their favorite brand. These brands are unique, because they create powerful emotions within their fans that are not found in ordinary brands.

Ordinary brands lack emotion. Keds. Buick. Battlestar Galactica (either one). Dunkin’ Donuts. Hewlett-Packard. Honda. The powerful emotions are not present for most people in these brands.  Even the websites of these brands lack the emotion of the powerful brands.

An amazing book entitled “The Power of Cult Branding” by Matthew W. Ragas and B. J. Bueno describes the Seven Golden Rules to cult branding. Emotion is the key to all seven. Social Groups, Courage, Fun, Human Needs, Contribution, Openness, and Freedom. All emotional, not functional. It’s not the best, biggest, brightest, loudest, or #1 product. Cult brands are focused on emotion, not hype.

If you want to turn your podcast into a powerful brand that you can monetize with a strong call-to-action, stir emotion every time.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Is your podcast emotionally powerful?

Are You Shouting? …

Are you shouting?

(photo by Tobkatrina)

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your products, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show“, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “No More Mondays” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may simply come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour weekly, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours.  Help your audience fill those hours, too.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting?

Is It An Ad For Everything Else? …

Is it an ad for everything else?

(photo by crystalvenus)

Media consultant Mark Ramsey had a fantastic blog post this week regarding the monetization of podcasts.

Mark says:

“In the world of these upstarts (the world we all now reside in), anyone can create media and the goal isn’t necessarily for the media to be monetizable but for the media to enable the monetization of other things.”

As long as podcasters see their show as entertainment first and advertising second, a podcast can go a long way to building a brand.  Adam Carolla does an amazing job at this.  He is very entertaining and uses his podcast to promote all of his other ventures.

Entertainment could mean companionship, advice or any other form.  If podcasters make the mistake many advertisers make by beginning with the product features rather than product benefits for the listener, their podcast will be no more effective than their advertising.

A great podcast can help build a great brand if the intent of the podcast is to help the listener in some way.

Read Mark Ramsey’s great blog here:  www.MarkRamseyMedia.com.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Is it an ad for everything else?

Stories Define Your Character …

Stories define your character

I’m not simply talking about your integrity. By character, I mean all of the attributes that create you, as in character in a play.  Your stories help define who you are as a person.

The purpose of your podcast is to attract an audience. Whether you want to monetize that relationship, encourage a call-to-action, or simply create an audience for your ideas, creating the audience is where you begin.

The stories you choose to tell reveal how open you are to others. Your openness is a sign of trust. Trust is a big piece of a relationship. Reveal things about yourself through your stories and you’ll begin to build trust with your listener.

The details you include tell your listener what you value. If the listener feels you value things they too value, you solidify the relationship. People like to hang out with similar people. If your values are opposite of your listener, you may also attract them. It is like a love/hate relationship. They may dislike it, but they continue to listen. For example, this often happens when talking politics.

What you find entertaining will be evident by the stories you tell. Since people like other people who have similar tastes, revealing those things you find entertaining will also build the relationship.

Stories also have the power to demonstrate your vulnerability. Stories can show that you are a real person. Your listener will see you as approachable. They also may begin to see you as a friend. That is when true relationships begin to form.

Next time you watch a late night talk show, notice how the great, memorable interviews contain great stories. Robin Williams and Billy Crystal being interviewed by David Letterman are great examples.  Interviews that focus on facts and information rarely cut through. Those guests come off more as a lecturer than as a friend. The guests that tell stories appear more personal, warm and friendly. Their stories reveal things and help you feel like you know them personally. Take note next time you watch.

Foster a relationship with your listener by revealing things about yourself through stories. Stories will define your character.

Include A Call To Action …

Include a call to action.

If you want to make money with your podcast, you must include a call to action. It seems logical. However, many podcasters believe, “If I build it, they will come.” It simply doesn’t happen that way.

Odd as it may sound, your podcast probably isn’t your product. Unless you are charging for your podcast, your show is only the marketing vehicle for some other product. Most podcasts are free. The show itself isn’t generating revenue. You need to create another product you can sell.

In his book “Free: The Future of a Radical Price”, Chris Anderson lists many ways to create revenue using the power of free. Many of these can be used to generate revenue from your podcast.

Some think access to the audience can be sold to advertisers as if it were traditional broadcasting. Unfortunately, audiences are not typically large enough for this model. Listeners also do not expect the traditional twelve minutes of commercials within their favorite podcast hour. Advertising is usually a very difficult path to revenue.

To generate revenue with your podcast, you need to create something else to sell.

You could make money by making your podcast a small portion of a larger show, which is available to paid members only. The free podcast becomes marketing for the member content.

You could turn your knowledge of some “how to” subject into a book, e-book, study course or other product. Your podcast could be the “why” behind your philosophy. The show would then promote the “how” that your listener will learn when they purchase the product.

There are many other ideas described in Anderson’s book. You could give away the product while charging for the service, such as consulting or coaching. Give away the content while making money referring people to retailers, like affiliate marketing. Rather than traditional advertising, you could give away the content while charging advertisers to be featured in it, similar to The Home Shopping Network. You could even take a cut of sales. You could podcast generic advice while selling specific, customized advice. There are fifty ideas in the book. To make money with your podcast, I suggest you give the book (or at least that section) a read.

If you build it, they may come. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you will become instantly wealthy. You need to create something to sell. You need to tell your listener to buy. Then, you need to show them the way. If you desire to make money with your podcast, make sure your podcast includes the call to action.

Trust Can Be Monetized

Trust can be monetized.

Structure is necessary for your podcast in order to build consistency and trust with your fans. The audience expects specific elements each time they listen to your show. They expect your style to be consistent. Your audience expects the host to be the same for each show. You must deliver to that expectation to build trust with your fans. This trust is where podcast monetization begins.

Think of McDonald’s. When you order a Big Mac at McDonald’s, you expect it to taste exactly like the last Big Mac you purchased and ate. That is true whether you purchased your last Big Mac at the same restaurant, across town, in another state or around the world. You expect it to be consistent. If the Big Mac you purchased today suddenly has mustard and sauerkraut on it, you would be a little hesitant to purchase another next time. You know what you want and want what you know. You want consistency.

Your audience desires the same consistency from your podcast. The consistency gained from the show structure helps the audience feel at ease and comfortable with the program. If your listener is new, she is brought up to speed quickly when you tell her what to expect. If the listener is a returning participant, your introduction causes him to say to himself, “Oh, yeah. Exactly how I remember it. This is the right show.”

If you are watching the news and suddenly there are two new anchors along with different people doing the weather and sports, you will wonder if you’ve somehow stumbled upon the wrong channel. It will feel uncomfortable. It isn’t what you expected.

Consistency helps your audience feel at home. Work to achieve it every time. Consistent structure builds trust. Trust can be monetized.