Tag Archives: money

9 Uncommon Books That Shaped My Podcast – Episode 120

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9 Uncommon Books That Shaped My Podcast – Episode 120

9 UNCOMMON BOOKS

We are all looking for great books and inspiration. In the online business space, the same books are often recommended and discussed. Godin. Ries & Trout. Think & Grow Rich. Those are the must-reads to be in the game.

Lesser known books can often offer powerful information and inspiration. They can also help you stand out from the crowd.

When I started in radio 25 years ago, I would read all I could about radio and business. I read the big books of the industry to keep up with the crowd. Those books were the center of many discussions at industry gatherings.

After I began programming my first radio station in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1995, I quickly realized keeping up with the crowd wasn’t going to put me ahead of the crowd.

To win, we need to think differently. To get ahead, we need to be willing to do what others will not. Find motivation and inspiration where others haven’t looked.

As you are trying to create a podcast that is unique and entertaining, one that will stand out and attract a following, take a chance on a few new ideas. Find a few nuggets that keep your heart pumping. Be a champion for a different way of thinking.

Here are few books that have inspired me. These books are not the typical fare you hear mentioned in every keynote speech. You won’t find these titles at the center of cocktail party discussions … unless you make it so.

However, these books have useful information you can put to work in your podcast and online business today. You can use these ideas to spark your creativity.

Find one book that looks exciting and inspiring to you. Give it a read. Maybe you’ll find your own wonderful spark of an idea.

THE POWER OF CULT BRANDING – HOW 9 MAGNETIC BRANDS TURNED CUSTOMERS INTO LOYAL FOLLOWERS (AND YOURS CAN, TOO!) – BJ Bueno and Matthew Ragas

This book covers the 7 rules of cult branding. As examples, the book explores the success of brands like Star Trek, Oprah Winfrey, Apple, Jimmy Buffett and Linux.

I love this book, because it explains the characteristics of brands that truly stand out from the crowd. These brands have created cult-like followings. The book gets me excited about what is possible.

PLATFORM – GET NOTICED IN A NOISY WORLD – Michael Hyatt

Michael Hyatt has a successful blog, podcast and membership site. In this book, he explores how to create a leverage your platform.

If you are in online business, this is a great read. I find another takeaway each time I read the book. This work is like a “how to” guide.

BEYOND POWERFUL RADIO – Valerie Gellar

Valerie dives into the characteristics of successful radio. These principles can also be applied to podcasting. From Valerie, I learned to never be boring. She says, “There is no such thing as too long, only too boring.”

THE MILLIONAIRE MESSENGER – MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND A FORTUNE SHARING YOUR ADVICE – Brendon Burchard

This book provides the steps to take to create your business. The process begins with selecting your area of expertise and ends with finding promotional partners and repeating the process.

It is an easy read. The book is the foundation of Brendon’s teachings. His work has really shaped my online approach.

MILLION DOLLAR COACHING – BUILD A WORLD-CLASS PRACTICE BY HELPIING OTHERS SUCCEED – Alan Weiss

If you coach, this book will help you build your process of finding clients.

This book was first recommended by Dan Miller of 48Days.com. Alan provides a great process to finding clients, converting leads and turning your coaching into a real business.

CIGARS, WHISKEY & WINNING – LEADERSHIP LESSONS FROM GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT – Al Kaltman

This book is full of great tips on management, overcoming obstacles, focus and competition. The lessons come from the actual events in the life of Ulysses S. Grant. It is an incredibly inspirational read.

THE KNACK – HOW STREET-SMART ENTREPRENEURS LEARN TO HANDLE WHATEVER COMES UP – Norm Brodsky and Bo Burlingham

This book discusses why start-ups fail, how to make sales and how to keep customers. Norm created a few businesses in New York City. He was also a contributor to INC. magazine. The lessons in the book come from his real-world experience and not simply theory.

THE E-MYTH REVISITED – WHY MOST SMALL BUSINESSES DON’T WORK AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT – Michael E. Gerber

This is probably the most popular book on this list. For the small business owner, this is a must-read. Learn to work on your business and not simply in your business. The lesson is fundamental for small business success.

CASH IN A FLASH – REAL MONEY IN NO TIME – Mark Victor Hansen and Robert G. Allen

This book shows you how to think differently to create quick cash, and then turn that cash into more cash. The lessons require action and courage. The book is creative in its storytelling.

 

I hope these books give you a bit of inspiration as you continue to grow your business. There should be at least one piece to spark some creativity for you.

Let me know what one you use. E-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Case Study: How To Set Your Price – Episode 119

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Case Study: How To Set Your Price – Episode 119

 

Set Your Price

If you are like me, and many others in the online space, you struggle with pricing. You don’t want it to be too low and leave money on the table. On the other hand, you don’t want it to be too high and not make any sales.

So, where do you set the price?

Pricing is tricky. There is a lot of art to setting your price. Most is trial and error.

There really is no “correct” price. Price is determined by supply and demand. The price of anything is that point where a seller is willing and able to sell AND a buyer is willing and able to buy. It is a continuum.

If a seller is not making much money on a sale, she will focus on another area of business that is creating more profit. If she is a public speaker on self defense and earns $2,500 per speaking opportunity on the weekends, she is creating decent income.

If she then creates an online course teaching other women self-defense and creates sales of $3,000 per week with an hour of work online marketing the course, she may opt to do less speaking and more work online.

Her speaking gigs require her to find clients, travel to the location, give the presentation for an hour or two (depending on dinner and other presentations), possibly spend the night, travel home and miss time with her family. That is a lot to give up in order to make $2,500 when an hour a night on her schedule could earn $500 more.

People may be willing and able to buy her speaking at$2,500. However, she may not be willing to sell it for that. She may do a few speeches. It may just be less frequent. If her price increases to $5,000, the decision may be different.

HOW DO YOU DECIDE?

When I began coaching podcasters, I came to that very problem. I was in that place so many entrepreneurs find themselves. A price needed to be set for my services.

What would podcasters be willing and able to pay that I would be willing to accept?

In this episode, I take you step-by-step through the process I took to set the pricing for my podcast coaching.

So, how do you set your price.

OVERVIEW

First, ask your customers what they will buy. This could be a survey of your list. You could simply study the market and determine what they are already buying. Find a few people that could use your help and ask five or ten of them.

Next, determine what problem you are solving for your audience. People buy benefits and solutions. People don’t buy mops. They buy clean floors. Solve a problem they know they have.

Then, price on value. Know what value you have to offer. Your experience, knowledge and ability all play into your value. This will determine why it should be you rather than anyone else.

You can now set a price by looking at the market and seeing what they charge. Buy a few similar products to see what is included if necessary. You want your price to be competitive, but not necessarily the cheapest.

Your price does not need to be less than everyone else. It should probably be more expensive than others in order to stand out. Make it a great value for the price to justify being at the top end.

If you tell your audience what to do, you can charge a low price. If you teach them how to do, you are able to set a mid-level price. When you do it for the, you can be at the high end.

To be at the top of the range, go all out and solve all of their problems. Be a full-service machine. Prove the value and then add a bit more.

Most importantly, have a sales process. Know how you will attract people to your process. Define how you will demonstrate your value and benefits. Give your audience a ton of value, then the opportunity to buy.

I am not guaranteeing you will make money. I am not promising you that you will get rich, or even make a dime for that matter. I do not know you or your abilities.

I am saying this process worked for me. You may find a few helpful tips here that could help you in some way.

If you show your visitors the value of your product or service while giving them more than they expected, there is a good chance they will buy.

As in my example, there are times when the price doesn’t make sense. This is when you need to review your process.

Is the issue the price tag as it was with my program at the beginning?

Does the roadblock appear due to the structure of the product or service as it did with my 12-week program rather than weekly calls?

Are your clients looking for a product or service tailored to their needs, like my calls ever other week?

Rather than launching your product to thousands of people at one time, launch to a few. See if they are interested at that price and value. Gather some feedback. Make adjustments. Launch again to a few more people.

As you adjust your sales process, you will find a spot where clients are willing and able to buy your product at a price you are willing and able to sell. If you are not selling enough, add more value or lower the price. If you are selling too much, raise the price.

Tinker until it feels right. There is no correct price. There is only a price with which you are comfortable and that pleases your audience.

See the info page for my coaching services HERE:

PODCAST TALENT COACH COACHING

Do you need help with your podcast? E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s see what we can do.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Podcast Resources – Episode 117

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Podcast Resources – Episode 117

Podcast Resources

(These tools can be found on the resource page at PodcastTalentCoach.com. Most links on that page are affiliate links. I receive a variable commission for all purchases made using those links. If you would like to support the show, please take advantage of some of these resources.)

I have recently received questions from listeners looking to launch a podcast in 2016. I thought this would be a good time to review the tools I use to in my business. This includes the tools I use to create my podcast, website and newsletter. We will also review the resources I use to learn, grow and develop.

This episode is an encore presentation of an earlier episode you may have missed. If you did catch it last time, let this serve as inspiration and a little refresher.

I have been using most of these resources for at least 24 months. Some have been used longer. A couple tools are more recent. For the most part, I have been a long-time user and have been quite happy with each of them. That is why I feel confident recommending them to you. You can find affiliate links to most of these online at PodcastTalentCoach.com.

COACHING RESOURCE

This list doesn’t include much technical information, such as mixers, processors and software. I leave that to Dave Jackson at the School of Podcasting. He is the tech expert that helps me. If you are looking for help setting up the studio, Dave is your guy. He leads off my resources.

TECHNICAL TOOLS

A few technical tools from my studio include my mic, my mac and a few web tools.

My studio mic is an ElectroVoice RE20. This runs about $450. It is a high quality mic. This mic is probably much more than a beginning podcaster needs. However, if you are serious about podcasting, this is a great mic.

My backup mic is a Audio-Technica ATR-2100. It is a quality USB mic for the money. This costs around $60.

For editing, I use Adobe Audition in the studio. I will occasionally use Garage Band for quick projects or when I’m traveling.

I use a Mac Book Pro 13” for the flexibility. I cost me $1,200.

My mp3s are tagged with ID3 Editor from PA Software. The price tag was $15.

I host my audio with Libsyn. It runs $20/month.

My URLs were purchased through GoDaddy. The price really depends on the URL. You can usually find a deal. After the initial deal, I pay about $45/year.

I have a website on Homestead and one on Host Gator with WordPress. Homestead is a stand alone site builder. Host Gator just hosts my WordPress site. Homestead is $20/month. HostGator is $135/year, just over $11/month. WordPress is free.

On my website, I use Paypal for my transactions. Most of my providers accept it. Plus, they have a card option for my customers.

I use Aweber for my newsletter. It is $196/year. Just over $16/month. I looked at Mail Chimp. Both are very similar services if you have a list under 5,000.

Canva.com is a decent resource for creating graphics. They have a decent photo library as well. Most photos are about $1/photo.

I self-published my workbook through Create Space, an Amazon company. You simply upload a .pdf. It is fairly simple to use. Not very expensive. They also sell the workbook through Amazon and converted it to Kindle.

I am in the process of creating a membership portal through WishList Member. $297. They have solid training videos. I am not yet complete with this one.

LEARNING TOOLS

Dan Miller and 48Days.com is where it all started. He has great tools to help you find your passion and the work you love.

Internet Business Mastery is a great podcast and course that have helped me refine my business focus. Jeremy & Jason have been there and done it.

Michael Hyatt has a great membership site with Platform University. It is based on his book Platform, which is a must read as you develop your podcast. There is great learning inside the community. He only opens membership a couple times a year for enrollment. I got in early on this one and haven’t looked back since.

Audible.com has turned my car into a mobile classroom. I am usually listening to a couple books a month on top of the podcasts. You can get a free book when you use my affiliate link on the resources page.

Most of all, I cannot say enough about Dave Jackson and the School of Podcasting. If you want to learn the technical nuts and bolts, check out his course, membership and training tools.

You can find affiliate links to most of these online at PodcastTalentCoach.com. I would appreciate the support if you choose to use any of these links and great products.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

A Memorable Podcast Brand – Episode 088

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A Memorable Podcast Brand – Episode 088

Lionel Ritchie is a class act and every bit of a gentleman you would hope he would be.
Lionel Ritchie is a class act and every bit of a gentleman you would hope he would be.

Do they remember?

When you consider the options podcast listeners have, the importance of creating a powerful brand really becomes apparent.

I searched iTunes for podcasts about hockey. There are hundreds of hockey podcasts available. Thousands and thousands of episodes exist that deal with hockey. You can find various topics, including drills, NHL teams, coaching, fantasy hockey and many more.

How do you stand out? How do you get noticed?

Your listener needs to remember your podcast, so they can return and listen again. That is the way to build a following. It really doesn’t matter how many people listen today. What builds a strong podcast is the number of listeners that come back the next time, and the next time, and the time after that. You build your audience slowly with more listeners this week than you had last week. Get your listener to remember to return.

Using your brand to create strong relationships with your listeners is critical to the health of your podcast. If you are bland, you will get lost in the sea of average. There are over 100,000 podcasts available for consumption. Most of them are average or worse. If you refine your content, turn your information into entertainment, and transform your podcast into powerful relationships, you will easily stand out from the crowd. It is a must not only for your success, but your mere survival. Begin your brand today.

When it comes time for your audience listening again, do they remember?

Be Yourself

A great podcast is a great relationship. It is just like creating a great brand. In order to develop that solid relationship, you must be yourself. You can’t fake it.

When you try to be someone or something you are not, you will not sound authentic. Eventually, the truth will come out.

Have you ever met someone you had admired from afar, only to have them do something that didn’t fit with your image of them? Maybe it was a baseball player, or a movie star, or a politician or a musician. You met them with great expectations of an encounter with your hero only to find out they were rude and average. It turned out they were only being who they thought they should be for the public when really they were someone completely different in real life.

Everyone has their flaws. That is what makes them human. Howard Stern has flaws. He makes his flaws part of his show. Domino’s Pizza admitted the errors of their ways with their cheap, low quality pizza. They laid it out for the world to see in their marketing. Your listener will accept your flaws. They will feel like you are “one of them” when you admit your flaws upfront. Don’t be afraid to expose yourself.

When your listener discovers you are something other than the character you portray, the bond of trust will be demolished. Your relationship will be forever damaged.

Build a solid brand. Be yourself.

Unique, Vivid, Mental Images

When someone tells a story, on the radio or in a podcast, it is theater of the mind. When you hear the old time radio show describe the dim light on in the servant’s quarters, the scenery is playing out in your mind in a unique way unlike the way anyone else could envision it. No other person is imagining the clothing of the characters the exact same way you are imagining them. That mental theater is unique to you. You are listening and imagining by yourself.

Podcasts make the one-on-one approach even more important. Podcasts are often enjoyed through headphones. Your audience is truly listening by themselves. The headphones block out all other sounds and distractions. You have multiple “one person” audiences at the same time. Yet, it is still one person.

Connect with your “one person” audience by creating a great theater. The theater will be different for each listener, because they are using their individual imagination. Create a movie and put the listener in it. Make the story an individual experience for the listener. Engage the listener with vivid details and a fantastic storyline. Make them forget they are listening to a podcast. Create great theater of the mind. Create unique, vivid, mental images.

I would love to help you with your podcast. E-mail me any time at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create Results Without A Big Mailing List – Episode 081

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Create Results Without A Big Mailing List – Episode 081

Erik K. Johnson & Tim McGraw

This week I am at the Country Radio Seminar in Nashville, Tennessee. It has been an amazing week so far. I am learning so much about audience engagement and am looking forward to sharing it with you in the coming weeks. That photo is me with the amazing Tim McGraw.

A few years ago, I saw an amazing presentation that debunked the 80/20 principle.

The 80/20 principle proposes that 80% of your results is created by 20% of your efforts. This could be 80% of sales from 20% of customers. It could also be 80% of success attributed to 20% of efforts.

This particular session focused on a study done in 2008 by Catalina Marketing that found that 80% of your results are driven by 2.5% of your efforts. Specifically, it found that 80% of sales at large companies like Coca Cola are driven by 2.5% of their customers. You can find the entire study here.

The study really proved that consumers no longer strive to be part of the crowd, but rather seek products that reflect their personal preferences, needs and lifestyle choices. Examples of companies that have built successful business models that appeal to the “me” consumer include Starbucks®, Apple®, Facebook® and Dell™.

This theory is perfect for podcasting. We can truly niche down and focus on the 2.5%. We can move the needle with a group of super fans much smaller than we once thought.

What are you doing to reach the 2.5%? How can you create results without that big mailing list?

Your podcast is a great vehicle to do just that. Let’s find the content to move your 2.5%.

EMOTIONAL CONNECTION

Develop your brand by developing an emotional connection. Stories will help you create that connection by revealing things about yourself. Hype will not sustain a brand. You need to be true to who you are.

A brand is a promise. You must deliver on that promise every time.

A brand is a collection of perceptions. You must deliver those perceptions consistently.

Speak the language of your audience when you deliver on your promise and your perceptions.

USE YOUR ASSETS

Use your podcast and other digital assets to drive your 2.5% to your website with a powerful call to action. Make sure you convert the visits with a very specific call to action every time.

In order to create a powerful call to action, create your plan. What is the goal of your show? Use your goal to create content that helps your audience. Create fans with your great content. Then, move them with your call to action.

You do not need a huge audience or a big mailing list. You only need a very passionate few percent. What are you doing to motivate your 2.5%?
The Country Radio Seminar is teaching me so much. It is also an amazing way to meet new people. You can do the same. Join me at New Media Expo April 13-16 in Las Vegas. I would love to see you when I present my session on powerful storytelling.

Learn how to use stories to create that engagement and powerful call to action. Meet a ton of new people to help you move your business forward. Use my affiliate link and promo code to save $100 on your registration here.
I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

The Important Trust Ingredient – Episode 072

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THE IMPORTANT TRUST INGREDIENT – Episode 072

trust ingredient

You and I have often discussed the ingredients necessary to create powerful business relationships. People do business with those they know, like and trust.

How do we create that important trust ingredient?

In order to develop trust, we need to build consistent structure with our podcasts.

Structure is necessary to build consistency and trust with your fans. The audience expects specific elements each time they listen to your show. They expect your style to be consistent. Your audience expects the host to be the same for each show. You must deliver to that expectation to build trust with your fans. This trust is where podcast monetization begins.

TRUST DESTROYED

In a matter of one meal, lack of consistency destroyed my trust in one of my favorite restaurants.

My family and I went out to a steakhouse for a family meal. This was a restaurant that we visited frequently. In middle America, steak is a frequent meal.

At this particular restaurant, my favorite steak is their filet. It is thick and juicy. Usually medium-well done. Just a little pink in the middle. Oh, so good.

If I don’t order it medium-well, it is usually too red in the middle. I can’t handle steak that does not look like it has been cooked all the way. A little pink and I’m good.

A nice baked potato usually accompanies the steak. I’m in Heaven. Perfect meal.

On this particular night, I ordered it the way I typically order it. Nice and consistent.

That is not the way I received it.

Instead, the waitress delivers me a something that resembles a flat iron steak. Not even an inch thick. It looked more like a strip than a filet.

If you are not a steak eater, this would look more like a flat chicken breast. A filet is more akin to a square tennis ball. The two are nothing similar.

In fact, I don’t even think this particular restaurant has a strip steak on the menu.

If I were to order a strip, I would order it medium. Anything more than that gets delivered like a piece of shoe leather. Which is exactly what this was. The steak was tough and nothing like I ordered or expected.

The consistency wasn’t there. The restaurant destroyed any trust I had in them to deliver a meal like I ordered. My favorite meal was gone.

That was the last time we had dinner at that restaurant. It was probably a year ago. The trust was gone.

I LIKE IT LIKE I LIKE IT

Think of McDonald’s. When you order a Big Mac at McDonald’s, you expect it to taste exactly like the last Big Mac you purchased and ate. This is true whether you purchased your last Big Mac at the same restaurant, across town, in another state or around the world. You expect it to be consistent.

If the Big Mac you purchased today suddenly has mustard and sauerkraut on it, you would be a little hesitant to purchase another next time. You know what you want and want what you know. You want consistency.

Now, translate that consistency to your favorite television show. It may be a regular, primetime show, the evening news or a variety show. It really doesn’t matter.

All shows follow the same pattern. Your favorite show opens with some sort of theme. It’s the same opening for every show.

The show open probably introduces the main characters, actors or hosts. The open lets you know what to expect over the course of the show. If it is a sitcom, you might see a couple outtakes from previous episodes that define the character. If it is the news, you may see a tease for the stories coming up. If it is a variety show, they will probably tell you about the big events on this particular episode.

The show will then roll through the content.

Eventually, the show concludes in a consistent manner each time. The news will usually end with some sort of lighthearted kicker story. Variety shows may have a musical guest at the end. Dramas end happily ever after.

Every successful show follows a pattern. It is a consistent pattern. You want to know what you’re getting each and every time.

The consistency gained from the show structure helps the audience feel at ease and comfortable with the program. If your listener is new, she is brought up to speed quickly when you tell her what to expect.

If the listener is a returning participant, your introduction causes him to say to himself, “Oh, yeah. Exactly how I remember it. This is the right show.”

If you are watching the news and suddenly there are two new anchors along with different people doing the weather and sports, you will wonder if you’ve somehow stumbled upon the wrong channel. It will feel uncomfortable. It isn’t what you expected.

Consistency helps your audience feel at home. Work to achieve it every time.

You can build that consistency by creating a structure for your show that will allow you to fill the time with great content.

FIVE Ws

Just like a great news story, you can create a solid structure by defining by the Five Ws. Develop the structure of your show by determining Who, What, When, Where and Why. This structure will be the same for every show. The content of the show will vary within the structure and keep the show fresh.

Who will the audience hear on the show? Many podcasts are hosted by one or two individuals. These people are the only voices the audience hears. One person as the host is the easiest version. If you are the only person featured on your podcast, you can create the show whenever you’d like. The downside is the fact that you will need to fill the entire show with content while talking to yourself.

On the other hand, two hosts pose other problems. With two hosts, there is often no a leader of the show. The direction of the podcast is left to chance. If both are not in the same room, they will often talk over each other without the help of non-verbal cues. It requires much more work and planning to make a show with two hosts sound smooth.

There are many other versions of “who”. The host can interview a guest on each show. Callers can be part of your show with the appropriate equipment. The audience could interact with the show via e-mail. Any version of the “who” works.

Multiple styles can be combined as well, like a late night talk show. You simply need to select the style that makes you most comfortable and be consistent with it.

As you are deciding your “who”, determine what role each voice will fill. If there are two personalities with the same opinion, one of them isn’t necessary. You’ll just waste the listener’s time trying to get each personality mic time while communicating the same message. It would be very similar to debating yourself. There must be contrasting points of view between the personalities to justify the existence of each on the show.

What will be on your show? This includes topics, interviews, callers, e-mail, audio clips, highlights, sound bites, articles and other material you might include in your content. Your “what” might be answering e-mail from listeners with questions on your topic. Your “what” might be your comments and thoughts on various articles you’ve discovered on your topic. You could interview experts in your field.

As I mentioned in earlier podcast episodes, using the voice of the person asking the question is much more powerful than you reading an e-mail. That second voice adds depth to the conversation, adds validity to the question and creates a sense of eavesdropping on the conversation by the listener.

If at all possible, use audio to make your point. As you determine what will be on your show, find the “what” that excites you.

Do not get into a rut. Be creative. Find new ways to say the same thing.

When will you record and post your show? Find the time of day when you have the most energy to record your show. If you are a morning person, and you love getting up at the crack of dawn full of energy, record your show in the morning. If you enjoy staying up late long after everyone else has gone to bed, and the creative juices are just beginning to flow, choose to record at night. There is a time of day when your energy is highest.

You need to find the right time, because your energy level will be noticeable coming through the speakers. If you are tired, your audience will know. If you are smiling, your audience will be able to hear it. Find your sweet spot, and record at that time.

You do not necessarily need to post your show at the same time that you record it. You could record four shows on the same day and post them periodically over time.

If your content is time sensitive, you might need to post your show the same day you record it. For instance, if you’re discussing the day’s news or sports scores from last night, it might be stale if you wait a week to post it.

You simply need to be consistent with your posts. If you decide to post your show every Tuesday at 3p, your listeners will expect your show to be there on Tuesday at 3p. You can’t post it at 5p. The listener will not come back hoping it is there two hours late. That would be similar to the 6 o’clock news starting at 7:30. That’s not when you expect it and you wouldn’t tune it at 7:30 hoping the news is there.

Deliver on your promise. Post consistently.

You also need to decide how often you will create a show. It could be daily, weekly or monthly. It should definitely be regular and consistent to build an audience. Your fans need to trust that the show will be there when you say it will be there. Select a schedule that you can handle on a consistent basis.

Do not attempt a daily show if you cannot stick to that schedule. It is much better to post weekly and deliver too much than it is to attempt daily shows and miss a few. Humans are creatures of habit. If you can get them listening to your show as a habit every Wednesday at noon during their lunch break, use it to your advantage by posting consistently.

Where will you create your show? This is an important detail. Each episode of your show could come from your “studio”. You could also record your show on location if you are incorporating guests.

The technology available today will allow you to record almost anywhere. Find a place where you can focus on your show and control the surrounding ambient noise. You want the sound quality of your podcast to be as good as possible. However, don’t let that restrict your creativity.

Strive to make it good, but do not let perfect get in your way. Location is an important factor to the professional sound of your show. Content is as well. Balance the two.

Why are you creating a podcast? You need to find your passion. If you are creating a podcast for reasons other than your passions, you will find it difficult to keep up the consistency required to be successful.

Find the one thing that you love to discuss more than anything else. That should be the topic of your podcast. Chances are, you already know a ton about your passion topic. You will also find it easy and rewarding to discuss that topic. Money will typically follow you if you follow your passion.

Work to create that important trust ingredient by building consistent structure with your podcasts.

Create a structure for your podcast that will remain consistent for each show. The consistency will help build trust with your audience. Deliver to the expectations of your listener. That trust is the first step in monetizing your podcast.

I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can find my podcast and other tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Can You Make Money With Your Podcast? – Episode 064

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Can You Make Money With Your Podcast?

People love to buy. They hate to have people sell to them. Create interest and desire. Make your fans want to buy. The hard sell rarely makes your fan feel good about making the purchase. How do we use our content to develop the desire to buy rather than the method to sell?

I believe it is possible to make money “with” your podcast. To make money “from” your podcast is much tougher.

Are You Important In The Life Of Your Listener?

The most important marketer in a person’s life is someone they know, like and trust. We all know this.

I used Dave Jackson’s affiliate link to build www.ErikKJohnson.com. This was after I got to know, like and trust Dave and his information at the School of Podcasting.

As I started in Podcasting, I hit Google to find information. That is where I originally discovered Dave. Then, I began seeing him in blogs and hearing him referenced in other podcasts. I began listening to his podcast to get to know him.

One day, I got an e-mail from Dave. He wanted to chat with me about podcasting to see if we might be able to help each other. It was great. That is where my trust really started.

After a few months, I used his affiliate link to build out my website for my podcast. It all started with the relationship.

This is the primary reason word-of-mouth is so powerful. The recommendation that comes from word-of-mouth usually only comes from a friend. A friend is someone you know, like and trust.

If the recommendation comes from someone you don’t know, the message is no longer word-of-mouth. The suggestion is now called “marketing”, or “sales” or “a pitch”.

If you want the call-to-action within your podcast to be effective, you need to build that trusting relationship with your listener. From your stories will come self-revelation. This will allow your listener to get to know you. By being yourself and sincere, you will become likable. Finally, if you continually help your listener get what they want by putting their interests first, you will build trust.

On the Dave Ramsey Show, Dave helps people with every call he receives. Out of six or eight calls in an hour, he may mention his books, websites or seminars once. He will always mention his “baby steps” philosophy. However, he will rarely suggest people buy his products.

Dave reveals many personal things about his past and his family. The listener gets to know him. He is often blunt and honest. Dave’s tough love makes him likeable. The help he provides his callers builds trust. These steps make Dave’s manta become a true following. His listeners spread the word to the point where The Dave Ramsey Show has around 5 million listeners.

If you have built a true friendship with your listener, where they know, like and trust you, your call-to-action will be powerful. Spend time creating that relationship between your brand and your listener. Then and only then can you effectively use word-of-mouth.

Are you important in the life of your listener?

After you build the trust, you can then create a powerful call-to-action.

Is That You Calling?

To create a successful podcast, you need to create an effective call-to-action within your show. So, how do we measure success? If we are trying to get our audience to do something by using a call-to-action (listen again, buy our product, visit our website, support our cause), our call-to-action should be our determining factor of success. Measure what counts.

When you create your podcast, you should measure your success not by the number of listeners or downloads, but by conversions to whatever you want them to be or do.

Let’s say your goal is to get people to visit the store on your website. If you have 1,000 people listening to your show, but you only get 2 of them to act and actually visit the site, you really haven’t been successful.

However, if you only have 200 listeners, but 100 love everything you do and visit your site regularly, I would consider that a success. Having 1,000 listeners may sound better than 200. By closer evaluation, I would much rather have 100 fans than 2.

Don’t get fooled by measuring the incorrect statistic. Measure what counts. Measure your call to action.

Create an effective call-to-action, and measure it.

Selling Is Easy, Right?

I was listening to an interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspire him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. Your marketing and engaging relationship will have them ready for your call-to-action.

This week, review your podcast. Let’s discover ways to make money with your podcast.

  • Are you building trust and properly positioning your listener to do business with you?
  • Have you developed something to sell (other than advertising within your show)?
  • Have you developed your strong call-to-action?

Let me know how I can help you with your podcast. E-mail your questions to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find other tools including worksheets, a workbook and videos to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let me teach you how to turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Your Effective Call To Action – PTC 045

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Effective Call To Action – PTC045

(photo by Albo)
(photo by Albo)

I was listening to an interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.  It makes your call to action powerful.

 

Selling is Easy

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspiring him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

We have discussed the call-to-action in previous episodes of Podcast Talent Coach. We simply need to determine what we hope to accomplish with our podcast episode before we begin recording.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

Building relationships with your podcast involves telling great stories. Revealing things about yourself through stories makes you real. Your listeners get to know and like you. As you continue to help them over time, you build the trust they seek.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. Your marketing and engaging relationship will have them ready for your call-to-action.

Do the hard work up front to make selling easy.

 

Shouting Will Not Help You

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your product, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show”, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “Smart Passive Income” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour per week, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours. Help your audience fill those hours, too.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting?

 

Ask For The Sale

After you’ve done the hard work building the relationship, don’t forget to ask for the sale.

One afternoon last week, I stopped by the quickie mart to get something to drink. As I waited in line at the cash register, the gentlemen in front of me set his purchase on the counter.

Among his items was a 2-liter bottle of soda. The bottle of soda was $1.69. The clerk said, “Did you know these are on sale two for $2? You can grab another and save yourself some money.”

The customers responds with, “Looks like I need to grab another bottle.”

By simply asking for the sale, the clerk doubled the purchase. The customer also benefitted by saving some money.

In fact, everyone wins in this transaction. The store is paying the clerk an hourly wage whether he sells one bottle of soda or 100. The cost of the clerk’s time to the store remains constant. Wages are the biggest expense to the store when figuring cost of goods sold. Therefore, by adding another bottle of soda to the purchase, even at the lower price, the store makes more money also.

It all happened because the clerk asked for the sale.

 

This week, review your show to ensure you are building those relationships.

• Start with the listener instead of your product or service

• Determine how you are going to help your listener with this episode

• Put a strong call-to-action at the end of the episode

 

Let’s Work Together

I would love to help you with your podcast. If you would like to improve your content, call-to-action and business, I have a few openings for coaching clients.

You need to be serious about making some money with your podcast. It may not be millions. However, you need to have the desire to make a little money.

We will work together to build a customized plan for you, your show and your business.

We have to date before we can get serious, right?

I’m offering a complimentary coaching call to a few candidates who are serious about their improvement. We need to see if we are a good fit for each other.

There will be no high pressure sales pitch. We can review your show to see if we work well together. If it clicks, we can lay out a coaching plan for you. If the call is not all you had hoped, no harm. We’ll just continue on as friends.

There is only room for a few. My calendar simply will not allow me to coach everyone.

If you are interested … and serious … e-mail me at Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com. We can get the conversation started.

 

Find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Building Your Podcast Business – PTC Episode 028

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Building Your Podcast Business

Most every podcaster has the desire to turn their podcast into a business. Though some podcasters treat their show as a hobby and an outlet for their passion, many reach a point where they wish to monetize their efforts. Podcast profits are possible in many forms when podcasters get creative.

Most podcasts do not generate enough cash to stand alone as a business. There are ways to generate revenue from the podcast, such as advertising and sponsorships. These methods typically bring in money in direct relation to the size of the audience. It is traditionally called CPM, or cost per thousand. (M for mille – Latin for thousand; M is also the Roman numeral for thousand.)

There are two primary issues with relying on advertising as your primary revenue source.

The first downside of CPM is the direct relation of hours to dollars. When you stop putting in hours, you stop taking out dollars. When you stop creating the podcast, the revenue stream stops as well. When you exchange hours for dollars, that is called a job. When you create something one time and it generates a continuous stream of income, that becomes a business.

Limited inventory and revenue is the second problem with advertising. There is a limit to the amount of sponsorship time possible within any particular episode. If your podcast is an hour in length, how much advertising could the show possibly contain? Two sponsors? Four sponsors?

At some point, the adverting becomes a negative to the audience. This is the issue terrestrial radio is facing. The commercial time has expanded to a level that is negatively affecting time spent listening to radio. Stations are hoping listeners will sit through 12 minutes of commercials on music stations and nearly 20 minutes on talk stations. People are looking for other content that does not force feed them content they do not desire. This is where your podcast will thrive.

You can turn your podcast into a business by developing a suite of products. Brendon Burchard, the author of “The Millionaire Messenger” and creator of Experts Academy, describes it as an integrated product suite. The podcast attracts a group of followers without wasting their time. Your content and message builds a friendships. Listeners begin to know, like and trust you.

Once you have built a loyal group of listeners that trusts you and your message, you can ask them to join your list in exchange for something free. This gets people to take the next step to become engaged with your brand. I use this with free worksheets, videos and other content. Fans give me permission to e-mail them pertinent, valuable content. The additional free content continues to build the relationship.

After delivering content over time, you can begin to monetize the trust you’ve built. Start by asking your fans to purchase a low end product, such as this workbook. The low end product doesn’t cost much. It is simply a purchase to break the barrier to make your fan comfortable doing business with you. Your listener can risk $20 to see if your products are as good as you say. Again, we are building more trust.

If you could sell 1,000 e-books at $20 each to your audience of 10,000 listeners, you would generate $20,000 in revenue.

Let’s compare that to the CPM model. The average CPM in podcasting is around $25. Using that same 10,000 listeners, your CPM factor would be 10, because you have ten “thousands”. $25 CPM x 10 “thousands” equals $250 per episode sponsorship. Two sponsors per episode would generate $500 per episode. Producing 50 episodes per year would then bring in $25,000 annually. That is just a little better than the e-book model.

There is a big difference between the two methods. With the e-book, you write it once. It then continues to generate revenue. You must create your podcast every week to keep the revenue flowing. At the beginning of the next year, your podcast starts over again. Your e-book continues to sell with little additional effort. You can also write another book to begin doubling your revenue.

The next step is a mid-range product. This would be something in the $200 range. While you continue to deliver great, free content and your book continues to sell and build trust, you can then produce your mid-level product. At some point, you will ask for that sale. Convincing 100 of your 10,000 fans to purchase your $200 product will generate $20,000. We are talking about converting one percent of your audience at this level.

This style of product layering continues as you build your business. It is all based on the relationships you are creating with your podcast. You are building trust with your podcast. The fantastic, free content allows your fans to know, like and trust you. Your podcast is the foundation of your business.

Your podcast is not your income generator. The relationships you have build with your audience becomes the conduit to create income. Your friendships will be the basis on which your business is built. We will turn those relationships into a suite of great products centered around your content.

Entrepreneur on Fire” with John Lee Dumas is arguably one of the most successful recent podcasts in terms of revenue generation. John releases a daily podcast 365 days a year. He has been able to monetize his podcast at a high level using sponsorships. In fact, he posts his monthly income report at www.EntrepreneurOnFire.com/income. According to his site, Dumas generated $39,400 from sponsorships in December 2013.

Even at that level of success, John Lee Dumas has other products. At nearly $40,000 a month, his show is bringing in almost half a million dollars in annual sponsorship revenue. If you examine the income report, advertising within the show isn’t even the largest source of income during the month of December. Entrepreneur on Fire generated $52,763 with John’s “Podcasters’ Paradise” program.

In total, Dumas lists 7 different revenue sources on his income report. These include a mastermind, sponsorships, an ebook, an audiobook, his program, one-on-one mentoring and affiliates. This is a great example of a suite of products. The entire program is built on the foundation laid by his podcast.

If you hope to build a business around your podcast, begin by developing your product suite. Brainstorm the various products and services you can create. Make a list of five to ten products that will begin to generate revenue for you. Then, start creating the one that will be quick and easy. This is where your business will begin to take shape.

Your entire business will be built around your podcast. This is where people will begin to trust you. Everything described in this workbook up to this point has been designed to get your audience to know, like and trust you. Only when we reach that point can we begin to monetize the show.

You are creating a relationship with your audience. The more you reveal about yourself on your show, the more you create influence through friendship. Your sales will be built on the trust you are developing.

Help your audience. In sports coaching it is often said that players will not care how much the coach knows until they know how much the coach cares. Show your listeners you care by helping them solve their problems. Develop that friendship.

Once your friendship is built, your listeners will begin to move through your product funnel.

Your product funnel is just as it sounds. We bring many people into the big end of the funnel. As they move through, the price goes up until only a few come out the small end. Your podcast and other free content is at the big end of the funnel. As we move to the low-tier $20 product, we lose a group of listeners. We then lose another group when we progress to the $200 product. Listeners continue to move along the funnel until we have a few dedicated listeners playing thousands of dollars at the small end of the funnel.

You cannot begin at the middle of the funnel. People do not begin by buying your $200 without knowing anything about you. The entire funnel is based around your podcast and the relationships you are creating.

Though your podcast will not be your primary revenue generator, it will be the foundation for your business. This is where it all begins. Make it great. Tell the truth. Make it matter. Have fun. Before you know it, you will be building great friendships on the way to an amazing business.

 

This week:

Develop your free bonus content

Launch an e-mail database like Aweber or Mail Chimp

Brainstorm a low-tier and mid-tier product you can create

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Powerful Profitable Podcast Stories

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Powerful Profitable Podcast Stories

Our goal is to create meaningful relationships with our listeners. Powerful, profitable relationships. We use engaging content to solidify those friendships.

What did you reveal about yourself on your show this week?

From self-revelation comes friendship. Can you think of a true friend that you know very little about? Friendship become stronger the more you share with each other. People learn things about you through the stories you tell.

How can you use the stories you tell to solidify your brand and strengthen your relationships?

We’ve discussed storytelling in Podcast Talent Coach Episode 002.

-The Power of Great Storytelling

-The parts of a great story

-How to structure a story

Today, I want to teach you about three other areas of storytelling that can help transform your podcast into powerful, engaging entertainment.

What Did You Reveal Today?

When you tell stories on your podcast, you reveal things about yourself. Vivid details are critical elements of great storytelling.

Details are more believable than generalities.

Details reveal specifics about your thoughts, beliefs and character.

Details put your listener in the moment helping them envision your story in their mind.

Garrison Keillor, in one of his “Stories From Lake Wobegon”, describes a woman who endures crushing loneliness and town gossip. (read more)

Memorable Words

American children’s author Dr. Seuss (Theodor “Ted” Suess Geisel) was more interested in telling a good story than he was in telling a true story. He often exaggerated. He always used wonderful, colorful words.

The good story approach is even described In his biography at www.Seussville.com. Dr. Seuss and his wife were unable to have children.

“To silence friends who bragged about their own children, Ted liked to boast of the achievements of their imaginary daughter, Chrysanthemum-Pearl. … He included her on Christmas cards, along with Norval, Wally, Wickersham, Miggles, Boo-Boo, Thnud, and other purely fictional children. For a photograph used on one year’s Christmas card, Geisel even invited in half a dozen neighborhood kids to pose as his and Helen’s children. The card reads, ‘All of us over at Our House / Wish all of you over at / Your House / A very Merry Christmas,’ and is signed ‘Helen and Ted Geisel and the kiddies.’”

Part of the magic that was Seuss was created by the words he used. (read more)

Tease With Anticipation

Anticipation is a key feature to storytelling. Your story should build just like a good plot builds in a movie. You need to make your audience anticipate the content that is on the way.

Your podcast should be like a vacation you are planning to take. The fantastic anticipation for the trip is almost as pleasurable as the trip itself. You can’t wait for the trip to arrive.

You want your listener to feel the same way about your content. When they can’t wait for the story to arrive, you have created some great content.

Teasing is the art of creating anticipation for your audience to entice them to stick around for the payoff to your setup. It is a critical element of your show. Teasing helps create momentum for your podcast. (read more)

 

I’d love to help you with your podcast. E-mail any questions or comments you might have to Coach@PodcastTalentCoach.com.

You can also find tools to help you create great content at www.PodcastTalentCoach.com.

Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Is That The Right Measurement? …

Is that the right measurement?

(photo by bartekwardziak)

Many podcasters and bloggers measure their success by the number of downloads of, or visits to, their material. Unless you are blogging or podcasting simply as a hobby, this is a mistake. Downloads and visits really don’t move the needle for you. They don’t generate revenue or move your product.

You need to figure out what you want your audience to do and how you measure it? What is your call-to-action? Maybe you want them to visit your website. Maybe you want them to buy your product. Maybe you want them to donate to your cause. Determine the call-to-action.

Once you figure out what you want your audience to do, you will then know what to measure. It may be visitors to a specific URL on your website. It could be units sold. You can easily measure the donations to your cause. All three of those events move the needle. Those are the things you should be measuring.

What are you measuring?

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Find your call-to-action. Is that the right measurement?

Is That You Calling? …

Is that you calling?

(photo by erwinova)

To create a successful podcast, you need to create an effective call-to-action within your show. So, how do we measure success? If we are trying to get our audience to do something by using a call-to-action (listen again, buy our product, visit our website, support our cause), our call-to-action should be our determining factor of success.

When you create your podcast, you should measure your success not by the number of listeners or downloads, but by conversions to whatever you want them to be or do.

Let’s say your goal is to get people to visit the store on your website. If you have 1,000 people listening to your show, but you only get 2 of them to act and actually visit the site, you really haven’t been successful.

However, if you only have 200 listeners, but 100 love everything you do and visit your site regularly, I would consider that a success. Having 1,000 listeners may sound better than 200. By closer evaluation, I would much rather have 100 fans than 2.

Don’t get fooled by measuring the incorrect statistic. Measure what counts. Measure your call to action.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Create an effective call-to-action, and measure it. Is that you calling?

Selling Is Easy, Right? …

Selling is easy, right?

(photo by friday)

I was listening to the latest interview CD that accompanies each issue of Success magazine. Publisher Darren Hardy was talking with Founder and President of Piranha Marketing, Inc. Joe Polish. During that interview, Mr. Polish proclaimed great marketing makes selling easy and unnecessary.

You may not be selling in the traditional sense of products or services in exchange for money. However, you are making a call-to-action within your podcast. It may be selling for money. It may also be inviting your listener to come again, asking him to visit your website, requesting that she join your mailing list, inspire him to get involved with a cause or any other action. It all involves selling yourself.

Polish’s statement was bold. As he went on to explain himself, Polish made perfect sense. In fact, his comments were very similar to the marketing and branding information we’ve been discussing with regard to your podcast.

In summary, Polish said great marketing gets people properly positioned, so they are pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you (or act on your call-to-action). Great marketing therefore makes selling easy and unnecessarily.

If you have truly engaged your listener and created that strong relationship we’ve been discussing, the selling should take care of itself. Selling becomes difficult when you are trying to get your listener interested. Selling before your listener is motivated is a challenge. Trying to sell to a listener that isn’t qualified is hard work. If your listener isn’t predisposed to taking action, you will need to sell hard.

When you have taken the time to build the relationship, your listener will be pre-interested, pre-motivated, pre-qualified, and predisposed to do business with you. They will be ready to buy. Selling, in terms of convincing your listener to buy, will be unnecessary. The marketing and engaging relationship created with your podcast will have your audience ready to act upon your call-to-action.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Selling is easy, right?

Are You Shouting? …

Are you shouting?

(photo by Tobkatrina)

You can’t shout your way into a person’s trust circle. They only way to gain trust is to add value. Give them something they can use. Building trust is the foundation of revenue generation for your podcast.

As you build trusting relationships with your podcast, continue to ask yourself, “How am I helping my listener?” Continue to give, and the trust will develop over time.

When you begin every discussion with your products, needs or wants, people will tune you out. You will begin to sound (and be treated) like advertisements for used cars. Shouting doesn’t work. Your listener won’t care and will rarely return.

Serve first, many times over. Then and only then can you effectively sell.

Shows like the “Dave Ramsey Show“, “48 Days To The Work You Love” and “No More Mondays” are all designed to help their listeners first. Sure, they all have products to sell as the end result. However, they never begin with their product. The discussions on these shows always begin with the listener’s needs in mind first.

As you prepare for your show, find great ways to help. Your help may simply come in the form of entertainment. You may serve as companionship for your podcast listener. Help them find other forms of companionship as well. If your podcast is only one hour weekly, there are 167 more hours in the week that aren’t occupied by your show. Your listeners will surely need more companionship to fill a few of those hours.  Help your audience fill those hours, too.

— I’d love to help you with your podcast. Post any questions or comments you might have, or e-mail me at Erik@PodcastTalentCoach.com. Let’s turn your information into engaging entertainment.

Are you building trust, or are you shouting?

Include A Call To Action …

Include a call to action.

If you want to make money with your podcast, you must include a call to action. It seems logical. However, many podcasters believe, “If I build it, they will come.” It simply doesn’t happen that way.

Odd as it may sound, your podcast probably isn’t your product. Unless you are charging for your podcast, your show is only the marketing vehicle for some other product. Most podcasts are free. The show itself isn’t generating revenue. You need to create another product you can sell.

In his book “Free: The Future of a Radical Price”, Chris Anderson lists many ways to create revenue using the power of free. Many of these can be used to generate revenue from your podcast.

Some think access to the audience can be sold to advertisers as if it were traditional broadcasting. Unfortunately, audiences are not typically large enough for this model. Listeners also do not expect the traditional twelve minutes of commercials within their favorite podcast hour. Advertising is usually a very difficult path to revenue.

To generate revenue with your podcast, you need to create something else to sell.

You could make money by making your podcast a small portion of a larger show, which is available to paid members only. The free podcast becomes marketing for the member content.

You could turn your knowledge of some “how to” subject into a book, e-book, study course or other product. Your podcast could be the “why” behind your philosophy. The show would then promote the “how” that your listener will learn when they purchase the product.

There are many other ideas described in Anderson’s book. You could give away the product while charging for the service, such as consulting or coaching. Give away the content while making money referring people to retailers, like affiliate marketing. Rather than traditional advertising, you could give away the content while charging advertisers to be featured in it, similar to The Home Shopping Network. You could even take a cut of sales. You could podcast generic advice while selling specific, customized advice. There are fifty ideas in the book. To make money with your podcast, I suggest you give the book (or at least that section) a read.

If you build it, they may come. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean you will become instantly wealthy. You need to create something to sell. You need to tell your listener to buy. Then, you need to show them the way. If you desire to make money with your podcast, make sure your podcast includes the call to action.